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  • Adolescence strongly driven by biological imperative but not in a vacuum.
  • Storytimes: fairytales in other languages – tell story only from pictures; encourage adults to tell children a story from their life – first house they lived in, a time they went to the park/grocery store/did an activity that was mentioned in a storytime book; make meeting spaces available for family play groups to encourage adults sharing parenting stories Story Starters: Clifford program – hand out pictures of dogs and have kids tell about the dog in the picture; Fancy Nancy part – tell about what their fancy day would involve Craft programs – flannel board or stick puppet making (library provides materials and patterns); Story Blocks – three dice, one with characters, one with setting and one with plot points
  • DIY - with a centralized theme – deployed parents, dating, memories from childhood Icebreakers: KidChat, zombies, one end of room is totally agree, one end is totally disagree & everything in between (interesting stories, I am a poet, I like Thai food) School projects – Peopling the Nation Digital storytelling – intergenerational storytelling – StoryCorps-style with elders, telling stories to youngers; book trailers, promos for teen councils or book groups
  • DIY – work, how I got here, middle/high school horror stories; “Moth-style” - SLAM stories are limited to five minutes, and ten stories are heard (names drawn from a hat). The stories are scored by three teams of audience-member judges, and a winner is announced at every SLAM.
  • Language exchange: Talk Time – for people trying to practice their English, volunteers trained in story and conversation starters, lots of laughing and sharing Community organizations: neighborhood “First Friday” art walks include storytelling about the neighborhood along with walking tours, local artists and business open houses veterans groups - oral history projects (provide recording time and space, StoryCorps-like questions Community Justice: Restorative Justice; concept is that focuses on accountability as a focus in rehabilitation, encouraging offenders to talk about the ripple effect caused by their actions; Restorative listening: only when those most impacted are heard, acknowledged and efforts have been made to repair the harm can the community be made whole again. Once the following questions are answered - What happened?, Who was harmed?, How were they harmed?, and How can the harm be repaired? - we can identify ways to move forward. Juvenile Justice Health: PDX-based Boys Advocacy and Mentoring – groups designed to help boys communicate more honestly and effectively, utilizes personal storytelling techniques combines with physical activity Washington-based therapist/storyteller Allison Cox Storytelling to teach dealing with tough choices and building resiliency – teen pregnancy prevention Using stories to teach on health topics without confrontation (asthma, allergies, teen sex issues, elder health, domestic violence, breast cancer awareness)
  • Language exchange: Talk Time – for people trying to practice their English, volunteers trained in story and conversation starters, lots of laughing and sharing Community organizations: neighborhood “First Friday” art walks include storytelling about the neighborhood along with walking tours, local artists and business open houses veterans groups - oral history projects (provide recording time and space, StoryCorps-like questions Community Justice: Restorative Justice; concept is that focuses on accountability as a focus in rehabilitation, encouraging offenders to talk about the ripple effect caused by their actions; Restorative listening: only when those most impacted are heard, acknowledged and efforts have been made to repair the harm can the community be made whole again. Once the following questions are answered - What happened?, Who was harmed?, How were they harmed?, and How can the harm be repaired? - we can identify ways to move forward. Juvenile Justice Health: PDX-based Boys Advocacy and Mentoring – groups designed to help boys communicate more honestly and effectively, utilizes personal storytelling techniques combines with physical activity Washington-based therapist/storyteller Allison Cox Storytelling to teach dealing with tough choices and building resiliency – teen pregnancy prevention Using stories to teach on health topics without confrontation (asthma, allergies, teen sex issues, elder health, domestic violence, breast cancer awareness)

PPT PPT Presentation Transcript

  • Catch Them By the Tale Storytelling Rewires Your Brain and Helps Build Community
  • THE NEUROSCIENCE OF STORYTELLING Julie M. Rosenzweig, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. Portland State University Presentation: Catch Them by the Tale: Storytelling Rewires Your Brain and Helps Build Community Public Library Association 13 th Annual Conference Portland, OR March 27, 2010
  • TWO HALVES OF THE WHOLE
    • Left-hemisphere :
    • logical
    • cause/effect reasoning
    • verbal processing (language)
    • sequential
    • plans and structures
    • controls feelings
    • Right-hemisphere:
    • attachment processes
    • non-linear
    • intense emotion
    • body sense
    • social
    • images, themes, patterns
    • CORPUS CALLOSUM
    • Connective body between hemispheres, 200 million nerve fibers.
    • Transfers information between left and right (interhemipsheric communication).
  • AMYGDALA “almond”
    • Temporal lobes
    • Major affective activities, especially fear--fight or flight, self-preservation
    • Connected important brain centers, including the neocortex and visual cortex.
    • Receives information first, tells you how you feel
    • Autism: social behavior interpretation
    • Depression
    • PTSD
  • HIPPOCAMPUS “seahorse”
    • Temporal lobes
    • Learning and memory
    • Converts short term to permanent memory
    • Affected by estrogen.
    • Key structure in Alzheimer's dementia.
    • If mood symptoms are severe, trauma- hippocampus shrinks.
    • Makes new neurons.
  • PREFRONTAL CORTEX (PFC)
    • Executive functions (dorsolateral frontal cortex)
      • Planning
      • Reasoning
      • Problem solving
    • Moral & social cognitions
      • Delays/inhibits immediate reaction to stimuli (orbitofrontal cortex)
      • Forecast consequences of current actions on future goals
    • Fast thinking
    • Long-term memories
    • Injuries create impairment to social abilities
  • IMPLICIT MEMORY
    • Amygdala, right brain primary
    • Present at birth
    • Pre-verbal
    • Mental models
    • Encodes emotions, behavioral patterns, learned habits, perceptions
    • Conscious attention not required for encoding
    • Recall void of internal sensation remembering
    • When activated strong feelings/body sensations
     
  • EXPLICIT MEMORY
    • Hippocampus, left brain primary
    • Middle of second year
    • Requires conscious attention for encoding
    • Autobiographical: sense of self & time
    • Factual
    • Recall includes internal sensation of remembering
    • Sense of self in the past
    • Creates narratives
    Fig. 19-7 - Long-term storage of implicit memory for sensitization involves changes shown in Fig. 19-6 plus changes in protein synthesis that result in formation of new synaptic connections. (Kandel, ER, JH Schwartz and TM Jessell (2000) Principles of Neural Science . New York: McGraw-Hill.)
  • BRAIN PLASTICITY
    • The ability of the brain to change throughout life ( rewire ).
    • Development, injury, trauma.
    • Reorganizes : new synaptic connections, new neural pathways.
    • New learning creates change.
    • Change is environmentally dependent .
    • Learning does not have to be within our conscious awareness.
  • STORYTELLING
    • “An emergent language of the heart” (Rudolf Steiner Institute).
    • Intrinsic and basic form of human communication.
    • Telling of stories in an integral and essential part of the human experience (NSMA).
    • Story-telling-story-listening is a multifaceted relationship.
  • STORIES
    • Every culture creates stories to make sense of their world.
    • Stories sustain connection between generations.
    • Stories pass on wisdom, beliefs, & values.
    • Stories can be cautionary tales or inspirational legends.
  • THE NARRATIVE SELF
    • We live within and through stories.
      • cultural, familial, public, private, invited, intrusive, known, unknown
    • Stories facilitate sense-making.
    • Stories have are about the past, the present, and the anticipated future.
  • “ Narratives allow us to travel back and forth in time, to create imaginary or alternative realities, to re-interpret the past…because narratives extend the ‘temporary horizon’, they are crucial to the development of a ‘self’, an autobiographical self” (Dautenhahn, 2002).
  • STORIES &THE RELATIONAL BRAIN
    • The brain is relational and social .
    • Stories are relational.
      • early attachment experiences-- basic blueprint for future relationships.
    • Narrative capacity allows formation & negotiation of social relationships.
      • empathy , mirror neurons
    • “ Pre-verbal transactions in narrative format bootstrap a child’s development of social competence and social understanding” (Dautenhahn, 2002).
    • Narratives help us cope through providing meaning to interpersonal relationships.
  • STORY AND MEMORY
    • “ Through stories memory is kept alive.”
    • “ Memory anticipates the future .”
    • (Siegel)
    • Memories are neural patterns in the brain.
    • Current neural patterns are matched with prior patterns .
    • Stories create predictability in our lives.
    • Memory links present, future, past
    • Meaning making takes places when the emotional story is narrated .
    • Mean making takes place through neural integration .
    • Coherent narrative.
  • STORY LISTENING
    • Story-listeners:
    • Link plot, sequence, characters to their own experiences ( transactional relationship ).
    • Attribute motivates to characters, experiencing empathy for them.
    • Develop a relationship with the teller and the characters.
    • Have a shared social-emotional experience with co-listeners.
  • POSSIBILITIES
    • Storytelling activities…
    • Promotes social-emotional development.
    • Increases empathic capacity.
    • Enhances meaning-making ability.
    • Engages learning more effectively.
    • Creates critical neuro-integration of emotional intelligence and cognitive abilities.
    • Develops listening skills.
    • Supports autobiographical coherence.
  • CHANGE A BRAIN CHANGE A FUTURE
  • Traditional Storytelling
  • And now for something completely different
  • Storytelling with CHILDREN:
    • Build time into storytimes for adults to tell stories to children
    • Use Story Starters as part of children’s programs
    • Offer craft programs that support telling stories
  • Storytelling with TEENS:
    • Host Poetry Slams or DIY storytelling night for teens
    • Use ice breakers at Teen Council and book group meetings
    • Pay attention to local school projects
    • Digital storytelling
  • Storytelling with ADULTS:
    • Host DIY storytelling nights with a centralized theme
    • Use ice breakers at book group meetings
    • Host a Moth-style StorySlam http://www.themoth.org/storyslams
  • Storytelling and the COMMUNITY:
    • Language exchange groups
    • Local community organizations
    • Community Justice
    • Physical and Mental Health
  • Storytelling and the COMMUNITY:
    • Language exchange groups
    • Local community organizations
    • Community Justice
    • Physical and Mental Health
    • Feeling inspired?
    • What has worked?
    • What would you like to try?