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Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
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  • 1. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1
  • 2. 2 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 Haere mai, nau mai, tauti mai ki Te Whare Wananga o Ōtago, haere mai te ihi, te wehi, te mana, te tapu. Tēnā koutou ngā tauira kua tae mai ki tēnei Wānanga, tēnei mātai, Te Mātai Io Tōpū. Welcome to the Neuroscience Programme at the University of Otago For information and course advice contact the Neuroscience Programme Director: Neuroscience Programme Phone: 64 3 479 9111 University of Otago Fax: 64 3 479 5200 PO Box 56 Email: neuroscience@otago.ac.nz Dunedin 9054 http://www.otago.ac.nz/neuroscience New Zealand
  • 3. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 3 Contents 1 INTRODUCTION 8 1.1 Neuroscience @ Otago 8 1.2 What is Neuroscience? 8 1.3 Career Opportunities in Neuroscience 9 2 INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 9 3 GENERAL INFORMATION 10 3.1 Support for Tauira Māori 10 3.2 Students with a Disability 10 3.3 Plagiarism 11 4 ACADEMIC STAFF AND DEPARTMENTS 12 4.1 Board of Studies 12 4.2 Teaching Staff and Research Supervisors 12 4.2.1 Professors 12 4.2.2 Associate Professors 13 4.2.3 Senior Lecturers 13 4.2.4 Lecturers 14 4.2.5 Senior Research Fellow 14 4.2.6 Research Fellow 15 5 THE NEUROSCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME BSC BSC (HONS) 15 5.1 Neuroscience Degree Flow Chart 15 5.2 First Year 16 5.3 Second Year 16 5.4 Summer Research Projects 17 5.5 Third Year 18 5.6 BSc (Hons) fourth year, PGDipSci, and MSc first year 18 5.7 Calendar Subject Requirements 18 5.7.1 BSc Major Subject Requirements 18 5.7.2 BSc Honours Major Subject Requirements 19 6 THE NEUROSCIENCE POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMME 20 6.1 Choice of Course 20 6.1.1 PGDipSci Subject Requirements 21 6.1.2 Two year MSc 22 6.2 Application For Admission To PhD 22 7 COURSE CONTENT 22 7.1 Required papers at 100-level 22 7.1.1 CELS 191 Cell and Molecular Biology 22 7.1.2 HUBS 191 Human Body Systems I 22 7.1.3 PSYC 111 Brain and Behaviour 23
  • 4. 4 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 7.2 100-level papers from which a selection must be passed 23 7.2.1 CHEM 191  The Chemical Basis of Biology and Human Health 23 7.2.2 PHSI 191 Biological Physics 23 7.2.3 BIOC 192 Foundations of Biochemistry 23 7.2.4 BIOL 112 Animal Biology 23 7.2.5 HUBS 192 Human Body Systems II 24 7.3 100-level paper which forms an alternative major 24 7.3.1 PSYC 112 Human Thought and Behaviour 24 7.4 Required papers at 200-level 24 7.4.1 PHSL 231 Neurophysiology 24 7.4.2 ANAT 242 Neurobiology 24 7.4.3 PSYC 201 Brain and Cognition 24 7.5 200-level papers from which a selection must be passed 25 7.5.1 BIOC 221 Molecular Biology 25 7.5.2 GENE 221 Molecular and Microbial Genetics 25 7.5.3 PHAL 211 Introductory Pharmacology 25 7.5.4 BIOC 223 Cellular Biochemistry and Metabolism 25 7.5.5 GENE 222 Genes, Chromosomes and Populations 25 7.5.6 ZOOL 223 Animal Physiology 26 7.6 200-level papers which form an alternative major 26 7.6.1 ANAT 241 Human Biology: Cells to Systems 26 7.6.2 PSYC 202 Social and Applied Psychology 26 7.6.3 ZOOL 221 Animal Designs for Living 26 7.6.4 ANAT 243 Reproductive and Developmental Biology 26 7.6.5 BIOC 222 Proteins and Biotechnology 27 7.6.6 GENE 223 Developmental and Applied Genetics 27 7.6.7 PHAL 212 Introductory Therapeutics and Toxicology 27 7.6.8 PHSL 232 Cardiovascular and Respiratory Physiology 27 7.6.9 PHSL 233 Cellular, Gastrointestinal and Renal Physiology    27 7.6.10 PSYC 203 Abnormal Psychology 28 7.6.11 ZOOL 222 Evolutionary Biology 28 7.7 300-level papers from which a selection must be passed 28 7.7.1 ANAT 336 Selected Topics in Neurobiology 28 7.7.2 PHSL 341 Cellular and Molecular Neurophysiology 28 7.7.3 PHSL 342 Integrative Neurophysiology 29 7.7.4 PSYC 323 Sensation and Perception 29 7.7.5 ANAT 335 Neurobiology 29 7.7.6 PHAL 303 Neuropharmacology 32 7.7.7 PSYC 313 Cognition and Neuropsychology 32 7.7.8 PSYC 317 Biopsychology 32 7.7.9 ZOOL 314 Neurobiology 33
  • 5. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 5 7.8 400-level papers 33 7.8.1 ANAT 454 Neurobiology 33 7.8.2 COSC 460 Neural Networks 34 7.8.3 NEUR 452 Neurodegenerative Disorders 34 7.8.4 NEUR 454 Systems Neurophysiology 35 7.8.5 NEUR 455 Sleep 35 7.8.6 NEUR 457 Developmental Neuroscience 35 7.8.7 NEUR 459 Neuroendocrinology 36 7.8.8 NEUR 461 Clinical Neurology 36 7.8.9 NEUR 462 Special Topic 36 7.8.10 PHAL 423 Neuropharmacology 37 7.8.11 PHSL 472 Neurophysiology 37 7.8.12 PSYC 469 Human Information Processing 37 7.8.13 PSYC 471 Cognitive Neuroscience 37 7.8.14 PSYC 474 Nervous System Plasticity 38 7.8.15 ZOOL 412 Neurobiology and Behaviour 39 7.8.16 NEUR 480 Dissertation 39 7.8.17 NEUR 490 Dissertation 39 7.8.17.1 Introduction 39 7.8.17.2 Dissertation Production 39 7.8.17.3 Workload and Supervision 39 7.8.17.4 Supervisors and Projects 40 8 SUPERVISION / RESEARCH INTERESTS OF STAFF 40 8.1 Anatomy Structural Biology 40 8.1.1 Dr Greg Anderson 40 8.1.2 Dr Stephen Bunn 41 8.1.3 Dr Marilyn Duxson 41 8.1.4 Professor David Grattan 41 8.1.5 Dr Christine Jasoni 41 8.1.6 Dr Beulah Leitch 42 8.1.7 Dr Ping Liu 42 8.1.8 Associate Professor Ian McLennan 42 8.1.9 Dr Ruth Napper 43 8.1.10 Associate Professor Dorothy Oorschot 43 8.1.11 Dr John Reynolds 43 8.1.12 Dr Joanna Williams 43 8.1.13 Dr Ming Zhang 43 8.2 Biochemistry 44 8.2.1 Dr Stephanie Hughes 44 8.2.2 Professor Warren Tate 44 8.3 Computer Science 44
  • 6. 6 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 8.3.1 Dr Lubica Benuskova 44 8.3.2 Dr Alistair Knott 44 8.3.3 Associate Professor Anthony Robins 45 8.4 Neurology 45 8.4.1 Dr Nick Cutfield 45 8.4.2 Dr Vic du Plessis 45 8.4.3 Dr Graeme Hammond-Tooke 45 8.4.4 Dr John Mottershead 45 8.4.5 Dr Alan Wright 45 8.5 Otago Bioethics Centre 46 8.5.1 Professor Grant Gillett 46 8.6 Ophthalmology 46 8.6.1 Professor Tony Molteno 46 8.7 Paediatrics 46 8.7.1 Dr Barbara Galland 46 8.7.2 Professor Barry Taylor 46 8.8 Pharmacology Toxicology   46 8.8.1 Associate Professor Cynthia Darlington 47 8.8.2 Dr Steve Kerr 47 8.8.3 Dr Ivan Sammut 47 8.8.4 Professor Paul Smith 47 8.9 Physical Education 47 8.9.1 Dr Jonathan Shemmell 47 8.10 Physiology 47 8.10.1 Dr Istvan Abraham 48 8.10.2 Dr Chris Bolter 48 8.10.3 Dr Colin Brown 48 8.10.4 Dr Rebecca Campbell 48 8.10.5 Associate Professor Pat Cragg 48 8.10.6 Dr Ged Davis 48 8.10.7 Dr Ruth Empson 48 8.10.8 Professor Allan Herbison 49 8.10.9 Dr Phil Heyward 49 8.10.10 Associate Professor Brian Hyland 49 8.10.11 Dr Philip Sheard 50 8.11 Psychological Medicine 50 8.11.1 Professor Paul Glue 50 8.11.2 Dr Richard Mullen 50 8.12 Psychology 50 8.12.1 Professor Cliff Abraham 50 8.12.2 Associate Professor David Bilkey 51 8.12.3 Associate Professor Mike Colombo 51 8.12.4 Associate Professor Elizabeth Franz 51 8.12.5 Professor Harlene Hayne 51 8.12.6 Professor Neil McNaughton 51 8.12.7 Dr Liana Machado 52
  • 7. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 7 8.12.8 Dr Bruce Mockett 52 8.12.9 Professor Jeff Miller 52 8.12.10 Dr Janice Murray 52 8.12.11 Professor Geoff White 52 8.13 Zoology 52 8.13.1 Professor Alison Mercer 52 8.13.2 Associate Professor Mike Paulin 53 9 ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF STAFF 53
  • 8. 8 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Neuroscience @ Otago Neuroscience is a coherent, integrated subject in its own right - but it can also be seen as comprising the ‘neuro’ part of each of a wide range of traditional subjects. At Otago, which is the only New Zealand University that offers undergraduate degrees in Neuroscience, the undergraduate programme consists of papers offered by a range of Departments: as of 2010 there are no “NEUR” coded papers offered until 4th year Hons, and for PGDipSci, and MSc degrees. Neuroscience is thus taught by staff from the Departments of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Biochemistry, Bioethics Centre, Computer Science, Neurology, Ophthalmology, Paediatrics, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Physical Education, Physiology, Psy- chological Medicine, Psychology, and Zoology. The Director of the Programme is appointed from one of the contributing Departments, and is currently Associate Prof. Brian Hyland, of the Department of Physiology; the previous Director was from Psychology - which reflects the fact that the BSc in Neuroscience at Otago is a truly interdisciplinary degree. There is no Neuroscience building - instead, Neuroscience is a “virtual” Depart- ment. In the absence of a physical building, Neuroscience students instead gather on the Web at a Neuroscience Virtual Space. This is a closed social and educational networking site exclusively for Neuroscience students to meet up with each other.Access is limited to those majoring in Neuroscience at http://tristar187. webcrossing.com/ . Other networking opportunities arise at Neuroscience-related Research Seminars across the University to which all students are invited via email. Neuroscience students also receive regular information about important events and job advertisements via an email list. Interested students not yet enrolled in the Programme should visit the Otago Neu- roscience Programme home page http://www.otago.ac.nz/neuroscience . From this page you can download a copy of this booklet or you can request a hard copy by emailing neuroscience@otago.ac.nz. If you are considering a major (or minor) in neuroscience you should discuss your plans with the Programme Director. 1.2 What is Neuroscience? Neuroscience is the study of the nervous system (both brain and peripheral nerv- ous system) in all its aspects and from all points of view. Neuroscience selects the ‘neuro’ component from each of a large number of parent disciplines. For example, Neuroscience is the basic science that underpins existing and emerg- ing applications in areas such as psychology, neurology, physiotherapy, sports science, information processing and robotics.
  • 9. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 9 Neuroscience is one of the fastest expanding disciplines in science, ranking with Molecular Biology as a growth area. The USA-based Society for Neuro- science has over 38,000 members and numbers are still increasing. Its annual conference is attended by more than 30,000 neuroscientists, many from coun- tries outside the USA, including New Zealand. Students enrolled in a Neuroscience study programme at Otago can join the Otago Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience for free. Contact neuroscience@otago. ac.nz for more information. 1.3 Career Opportunities in Neuroscience Graduates who wish to pursue a career in Neuroscience will normally proceed to a PhD and then to basic academic or applied research into artificial intelligence, behavioural neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, neural networks, neuro- anatomy, neurochemistry, neuroendocrinology, neuroembryology, neuroethology, neuropharmacology, neurophysiology or a range of other subjects. In addition to careers directly in academic neuroscience research, a degree in neuroscience will provide you with generic skills that are widely sought after by employers, with technical skills in areas (e.g. molecular biology or computing) where there is a worldwide shortage of skilled workers, and with a foundation for contributing to, and benefiting from, scientific and technological progress in coming years. Finally, Neuroscience also provides a convenient first degree for those proceeding to postgraduate specialisation in professional or applied fields such as audiology, physiotherapy and bioengineering. It can also be used for graduate medical entry and, for this purpose, is particularly suitable for those intending to practice neurol- ogy, neurosurgery, or psychiatry. 2 INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS If you are an international student intending to study neuroscience at Otago, you can find general information for international students (including visa requirements, transport etc) at http://www.otago.ac.nz/international/index.html Information on entrance requirements, English language requirements, course fees, scholarships, application procedures, and enrolment can be found, for undergradu- atesat:http://www.otago.ac.nz/international/undergraduate/andforpostgraduatesat http://www.otago.ac.nz/international/postgraduate/ . It is important before you consider enrolling to contact us (email: neuroscience@ otago.ac.nz) with details of your academic record including transcript of course
  • 10. 10 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 taken and grades. We can then provide you with a translation of your existing qualifications into our system. This will determine the level at which you can enter our programme. In some cases, you may be given credit for courses you have already taken for a degree that you have undertaken elsewhere and that has not been completed. 3 GENERAL INFORMATION 3.1 Support for Tauira Māori The University of Otago Māori Centre (Te Huka Mātauraka) is located at 515/519 Castle Street. The Centre offers support for academic, cultural and social needs from pre-enrolment through to graduation. The Centre is guided by kaupapa Māori and provides the following services: Liaison and Advice; Māori Orientation and Mentoring programmes; Tutorials and Seminars; Resources and Study Rooms. Haere mai ki te Kōhanga nei o te Tari Whakamātau Hinengaro. Ko te Kōhanga he wāhi whakahirahira mō ngā tauira Māori e whai ake nei i ngā mahi o te Tari Whakamātau Hinengaro me te Mātai Io Tōpū. Kei kōnei tētahi ahuatanga kei roto i te Tari Whakamātau Hinengaro, hei tautoko, hei āwhina i ngā tauira Māori kia mau rātou ki te mātauranga mō tēnei momo mahi. Welcome to the Kōhanga of the Psychology Department. This Kōhanga is a spe- cial room available for Māori students studying Psychology or Neuroscience. It is an initiative of the Psychology Department and has been specifically designed to provide an appropriate environment and suitable support for Māori students in their studies. Please feel free to seek advice from Dr Tamar Murachver, the adviser to Māori students in the Psychology Department, email: tamar@psy.otago.ac.nz . “Nau te rourou, naku te rourou, ka ora ai te iwi” “With your contribution and my contribution, the wellbeing of humanity is assured” 3.2 Students with a Disability Students are encouraged to seek support if they find they are having difficulty with their studies due to disability, temporary or permanent impairment, injury, or chronic illness. For general enquiries and advice, feel free to contact the Neuroscience
  • 11. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 11 course administrator: phone 479 9111 or email: neuroscience@otago.ac.nz . It is also recommended that you contact the University Disability Information and Support Office: phone 479 8235, fax 479 5873, email: disabilities@otago.ac.nz, or http://www.otago.ac.nz/disabilities. Once registered with that office, for each paper you should contact the Department concerned. Some Department’s Disability Advisers are: Anatomy Structural Biology: Kathryn McClea, phone 479 7362, email: kathryn.mcclea@otago.ac.nz Pharmacology Toxicology: Jacqui Carroll, phone 479 7266, email: jacqui.carroll@otago.ac.nz Physiology: Sue Deans, phone 479 5106, email: sue.deans@stonebow.otago.ac.nz Psychology: Dr Louis Leland, phone 479 7638, email: leland@psy.otago.ac.nz Zoology: Jo Forrester, phone 479 7982, email: jo.forrester@otago.ac.nz For other papers, please contact the Head of Department. 3.3 Plagiarism Students should make sure that all submitted work is their own. Plagiarism is a form of dishonest practice. Plagiarism is defined as copying or paraphrasing another’s work and presenting it as one’s own. In practice this means plagiarism includes any attempt in any piece of submitted work (e.g. an assignment or test) to present as one’s own work the work of another (whether of another student or a published authority). Any student found responsible for plagiarism in any piece of work submitted for assessment shall be subject to the University’s dishonest practice regulations which may result in various penalties, including forfeiture of marks for the piece of work submitted, a zero grade for the paper, or in extreme cases exclusion from the University. Further information can be obtained from the website http://www.otago.ac.nz/study/plagiarism/
  • 12. 12 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 4 ACADEMIC STAFF AND DEPARTMENTS Staff research interests, email addresses, and websites are listed, organised by Department, in Section 8. Staff are listed alphabetically with Departments in Section 9. 4.1 Board of Studies Alison R. Mercer BSc PhD(Otago) FRSNZ Chair Keith A. Hunter MSc(Auck) PhD(E Anglia)   FNZIC FRSNZ Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Division of Sciences Helen Nicholson BSc MBChB MD(Brist) Dean, School of Medical Sciences Wickliffe C. Abraham BA(Virg) PhD(Flor)   FRSNZ Psychology Mike Colombo BA(Colorado) MS   PhD(Rutgers) Psychology Allan Herbison BMedSc MB CHB(Otago)   PhD(Cantab) FRSNZ Physiology Neil McNaughton MA(Oxon) PhD(S’thamps) Psychology Ruth M. A. Napper BSc (Hons) PhD (Otago) Anatomy Structural Biology Michael G. Paulin BSc(Hons)(Otago)   PhD(Auck) Zoology Philip Sheard BSc PGDipSci(Otago)   PhD(W Aust) Physiology Paul F. Smith BA PhD (Syd) Pharmacology Toxicology Brian I. Hyland BMedSc MBChB PhD(Otago) Director 4.2 Teaching Staff and Research Supervisors For details of research interests and email addresses, see Section 8. 4.2.1 Professors Wickliffe C. Abraham BA(Virg) PhD(Flor)   FRSNZ Psychology Grant R. Gillett MSc MB ChB(Auck)   DPhil(Oxon) FRACS FRSNZ Bioethics Centre Paul W. Glue MB ChB(Otago) MD(Brist)     MRCPsych Psychological Medicine David Grattan BSc (Hons) PhD (Well) Anatomy Structural Biology
  • 13. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 13 Harlene Hayne BA(ColColl) MS PhD(Rutgers)   FRSNZ Psychology Allan Herbison BMedSc MB CHB(Otago)   PhD(Cantab) FRSNZ Physiology Neil McNaughton MA(Oxon) PhD(S’ton) Psychology Alison R. Mercer ONZM BSc(Hons)   PhD(Otago) FRSNZ Zoology Jeffrey O. Miller BA(Ohio State)   PhD(Mich) FRSNZ Psychology Anthony C. B. Molteno MB ChB(Cape Town)   FRCSEd FRACO Ophthalmology Paul F. Smith BA(Hons) PhD(Syd) Pharmacology Toxicology Warren P. Tate MSc(Well) PhD(Otago) FNZIC   FRSNZ MA-PIMBN Biochemistry Barry J. Taylor MB ChB(Otago) FRACP Paediatrics K. Geoffrey White BSc PhD(Otago) FNZPsS   FAPS FRSNZ Psychology 4.2.2 Associate Professors David K. Bilkey BA(Hons) PhD(Otago) Psychology Mike Colombo BA(Colorado) MS   PhD(Rutgers) Psychology Patricia A. Cragg BSc(Hons) PhD(Brist) Physiology Cynthia Darlington BA(Hons) PhD(Syd) Pharmacology Toxicology Elizabeth A. Franz BA(Whittier) MSc   PhD(Purdue) Psychology Brian I. Hyland BMedSc MB ChB PhD(Otago) Physiology Ian S. McLennan MSc(Auck) PhD(ANU) Anatomy Structural Biology Dorothy E. Oorschot BSc (Hons) (W Aust)   PhD(Otago) Anatomy Structural Biology Michael G. Paulin BSc(Hons)(Otago)   PhD(Auck) Zoology Anthony V. Robins BSc(Hons)(Cant) MA   DPhil(Sus) Computer Science 4.2.3 Senior Lecturers Istvan Abraham MD PhD(Semmelweis) Physiology Gregory M. Anderson BAgrSc(Hons)   PhD(Lincoln) Anatomy Structural Biology Lubica Benuskova MA(Vanderbilt) RNDr   PhD(Comenius) Computer Science
  • 14. 14 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 Stephen J. Bunn BSc(Hons)(Sur) PhD(Lond) Anatomy Structural Biology Christopher P. Bolter BSc(Brist) PhD(W Ont) Physiology Colin Brown BSc PhD(Glas) Physiology Nick J. Cutfield MB ChB (ImpCol Lond) Neurology Gerard Davis BSc(Lond) PhD(Birm) Physiology L. J. (Vic) du Plessis MB BCh (Witw) FCP(SA) Neurology Marilyn J. Duxson MSc(Melb) PhD(Lond) Anatomy Structural Biology Ruth M. Empson MA (Hons)(Oxon)   PhD DIC (Lond) Physiology Graeme D. Hammond-Tooke MB BCh   PhD(Witw) MSc(Lond) FCP(SA) FRACP Neurology Christine Jasoni BSc (Calif) PhD (Washington) Anatomy Structural Biology D. Steven Kerr BSc (E Carolina)   PhD (Wake Forest) Pharmacology Toxicology Alistair Knott BA(Oxon) MSc PhD(Edin) Computer Science Beulah Leitch BSc(Hons)(Belf) MSc   PhD(Wales) Anatomy Structural Biology Ping Liu BMD(Anhui) PhD(Otago) Anatomy Structural Biology Liana Machado BA(UCLA) PhD(UCDavis) Psychology John Mottershead BM BCh BA(Oxon) FRCP Neurology Richard Mullen MB ChB (Leeds)   MRCPsych (Lond) Psychological Medicine Janice Murray BSc(Dal) MA PhD(Wat) Psychology Ruth M. A. Napper BSc PhD(Otago) Anatomy Structural Biology John N. J. Reynolds MBChB PhD(Otago) Anatomy Structural Biology Ivan A. Sammut BSc(Hons) PhD(Sund) Pharmacology Toxicology Philip Sheard BSc PGDipSci(Otago)   PhD (W Aust) Physiology Joanna Williams MSc PhD(Otago) Anatomy Structural Biology Alan Wright MB ChB MD(Otago) FRACP Neurology Ming Zhang MB MMed(Anhui) PhD(Otago) Anatomy Structural Biology 4.2.4 Lecturers Rebecca Campbell BSc PhD (Oregon) Physiology Philip M. Heyward BSc(Well) PhD(Monash) Physiology Stephanie M. Hughes BSc(Hons) PhD(Well) Biochemistry Jon Shemmell BSc BAppSc(Hons)(Deakin)   MSc PhD(Qld) Physical Education 4.2.5 Senior Research Fellow
  • 15. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 15 Barbara Galland BSc(Hons) PhD(Otago) Paediatrics 4.2.6 Research Fellow Bruce Mockett BSc PhD DipSci(Massey) Psychology 5 THE NEUROSCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME BSc BSc (Hons) All degrees in Neuroscience are administered through the Division of Sciences. The general regulations can be found in the University Calendar and in the Course Prescriptions (also available on the University of Otago website - go to http://www. otago.ac.nz/courses/subjects/neur.html). Calendar regulations for Neuroscience are shown in Section 5.7 of this handbook. Intending Neuroscience students are advised to contact the Neuroscience Pro- gramme Director before enrolling for their first year (100-level) courses to ensure optimal course design. Students who have not taken, or did not obtain good marks in 7th form chemistry are strongly advised to enrol in the Summer School bridging chemistry course before enrolling for their first year. First Year Health Science students considering Neuroscience as a possible later option are strongly advised to include PSYC 111 in their first year course. However, it is also possible to join the Neuroscience Programme in second year if PSYC 111 has not been obtained. ☞ Thought about Honours? BSc(Hons) is an elite 4 year course that recog- nises high achievement and offers ideal preparation for higher study. Special requirements for Honours programme are indicated by the ☞ symbol. 5.1 Neuroscience Degree Flow Chart A diagram of the Neuroscience degree structure is provided as a centrefold in this booklet (pages 26-27). It shows the papers by semester and level - but it should be noted that papers can be taken in years that do not match their level. Thus, PSYC 111 is often taken in the second year and 300 level PSYC papers can occasionally be taken in the second year. To use the chart you need to: (a) ensure that the plan of your degree includes all bolded papers and their associ- ated prerequisites;
  • 16. 16 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 (b) select your desired 300-level papers and then work back from these to ensure that you have their prerequisites. 5.2 First Year Discuss your proposed degree with the Neuroscience course advisor during Course Approval. You should take CELS 191, HUBS 191 and PSYC 111 and normally CHEM 191 (see warning on page 21). BIOC 192 is recommended to allow Pharmacology and additional Biochemistry and Genetics options at second year level. BIOL 112 or HUBS 192 are recommended to allow Zoology options at second year level. If CHEM 191 is not taken, PHSI 191 and BIOL 112 or HUBS 192 are required for entry to second year. ☞ To be eligible to enter honours at the beginning of 2nd year, you need to take 126 points in your first year, including papers listed in section 5.2, and achieve at least a B- average overall and at least a B+ average across three required first year papers. You then apply at the end of 1st year. If you completed less than 126 points in your first year, or your grades were too low but you are still interested in honours, note that entry is possible at third year level, so long as you take the right number of 2nd year papers, and get at least a B- average overall and a B+ average over three second year required Neuroscience papers. Make sure to discuss honours during the sec- ond year course advising so you are eligible to apply at the end of your 2nd year. 5.3 Second Year You should take ANAT 242, PHSL 231 and PSYC 201 plus one of BIOC 221, BIOC 223, GENE 221, GENE 222, PHAL 211, ZOOL 223. PSYC 111 is taken in first semester if not already taken (this typically applies to students entering from Health Sciences First Year). If PHAL 211 is not taken, this will limit the allowable papers at 300-level. During first semester at least, and throughout second year if possible, it is strongly recommended to take the papers to fulfil the 200-level major subject requirements in one of ANAT, BIOC, GENE, PHAL, PHSL, PSYC or ZOOL. Specific and/or extra requirements to hold open a 2nd major through 1st semester of 2nd year (italic), or through all of second year (bold) (Most common options): Major 100-level, S1 100-level, S2 200-level, S1 200-level, S2 ANAT HUBS 192 ANAT 241 ANAT 243
  • 17. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 17 Major 100-level, S1 100-level, S2 200-level, S1 200-level, S2 BIOC CHEM 191 BIOC 192 BIOC 221 BIOC 222 BIOC 223 GENE CHEM 191 GENE 221 GENE 222 GENE 223 PHAL CHEM 191 BIOC 192 PHAL 211 PHAL 212 PHSL CHEM 191 or PHSI 191 HUBS 192 PHSL 232 PHSL 233 PSYC PSYC 112 PSYC 202 1 ZOOL BIOL 112 2 ZOOL 221 ZOOL 222 ZOOL 223 Notes: (1) this paper is worth 27 points; (2) Department may allow HUBS 192 to substitute, with B grade or better. ☞ Honours students (and those hoping to enter honours at third year) should take the same base course as the BSc plus enough other papers (including if necessary PSYC 111) to total 126 points, and note that two of (BIOC 221 or BIOC 223), (GENE 221 or GENE 222), PHAL 211, ZOOL 223 are prerequisite for entry to 400-level papers - so it is a good idea to include the second one during 2nd year if possible. 5.4 Summer Research Projects Working in a laboratory over the summer at the end of second or third year, is a great way to get insight into neuroscience research. Indeed, BSc(Hons) students, and BSc students intending to proceed to a PGDipSci, are strongly recommended at the end of third year to carry out a summer research project in the laboratory in which they will be undertaking their 4th year project. The work carried out in the summer project cannot itself be included in your fourth year thesis. However, already being trained in the necessary techniques and having extensive contact with your supervisor before the teaching year starts allow you to start collecting thesis data at the earliest possible moment. Funding for 10 weeks work can be obtained through summer scholarships, depending on your grades. If you are interested in this you should early in 2nd semester (a) contact potential supervisors (see Supervision/Research Interests of Staff, section 8) to discuss possible projects and (b) check University/Departmental notice boards for announcements regarding scholarship applications.
  • 18. 18 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 5.5 Third Year BSc students take four ofANAT 335 (Neurobiology),ANAT 336 (Selected Topics in Neurobiology), PHAL303 (Neuropharmacology), PHSL341 (Cellular and Molecular Neurophysiology), PHSL 342 (Integrative Neurophysiology), PSYC 313 (Cognition and Neuropsychology), PSYC 317 (Biopsychology), PSYC 323 (Sensation and Perception), and ZOOL 314 (Neurobiology). They also take one of BIOC 221, BIOC 223, GENE 221, GENE 222, PHAL 211, ZOOL 223, if not previously taken. ☞ BSc(Hons) students (and those hoping for direct entry to 4th year honours) take six of ANAT 335, ANAT 336, PHAL 303, PHSL 341, PHSL 342, PSYC 313, PSYC 317, PSYC 323, and ZOOL 314, together with additional papers to a total of 126 points. These must include the additional one of BIOC 221, BIOC 223, GENE 221, GENE 222, PHAL 211, ZOOL 223, if not previously taken. To enter at 4th year if not already in the Honours programme, you need at least a B+ average for the six 300-level Neuroscience papers. 5.6 BSc (Hons) fourth year, PGDipSci, and MSc first year ☞ You will choose four papers from ANAT 454, COSC 460, PHAL 422, 423, PHIL 461, PHSL 472, PSYC 469, 471, 474, 476, ZOOL 412, NEUR 452, 454, 455, 457, 459, 461 and 462, plus NEUR 490 (thesis)(BSc and some PGDipSci) or NEUR 480 (some PGDipSci) or NEUR 495 (MSc, see section 6). The thesis supervisor will usually be chosen from one of the members of staff listed in Section 8. However, subject to the approval of the Neuroscience Programme Director and the agreement of the proposed supervisor, a project can be carried out in any Department of the University. Try and select and contact a supervisor during your third year and arrange to undertake a summer scholarship with them. For administrative purposes, NEUR 490, 480, 495 code must be replaced by a specific Department code once you know who your supervisor will be. 5.7 Calendar Subject Requirements 5.7.1 BSc Major Subject Requirements 100-level: CELS 191, HUBS 191, PSYC 111 and two of BIOC 192, BIOL 112 or HUBS 192, CHEM 191, PHSI 191 200-level: ANAT 242, PHSL 231, PSYC 201, and one of BIOC 221, 223, GENE 221, 222, PHAL 211, ZOOL 223
  • 19. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 19 Students are strongly recommended to include one of the following sets of papers: ANAT 241 - 243 or BIOC 221 - 223 or GENE 221 - 223 or PHAL 211, 212, or PHSL 231 - 233 or PSYC 201, 202 or ZOOL 221 - 223 (to keep another major option) PSYC 203 may be substituted for PSYC 201 in approved cases. 300-level: Four of ANAT 335, 336, PHAL 303, PHSL 341, 342, PSYC 313, 317, 323, ZOOL 314 5.7.2 BSc Honours Major Subject Requirements ☞ Note: Honours regulations are usually worded to require entire sets of papers to be passed, in each year of study. To provide flexibility in a compound programme like Neuroscience, for instance to enable entry to Hons at 2nd year level for students who do not enter the programme until that year, the Honours regulations for Neuroscience are worded differently, as sets of prerequisites that must be achieved before entry to any particular level. Key points are: • At least 126 points of study must be undertaken each year. • PSYC 111 is a 100-level paper, but can be achieved in second year. • Two papers from a list of optional 200-level papers must be achieved, instead of one from the list for BSc. The second paper can be taken in third year, if necessary. • Six papers from a list of 300 level papers must be taken in third year, instead of four for a BSc. • In addition to the prerequisites, a grade point average of at least B- across all papers taken so far, and B+ for three BSc Neuroscience major requirement papers taken in the previous year must be obtained for entry at any particular level. The prerequisites are as follows: For entry to Second year: At least 126 points including CELS191, HUBS 191, and two of BIOC 192, BIOL 112 or HUBS 192, CHEM 191, PHSI 191. For entry to Third Year: All BSc Neuroscience 100 and 200 level papers, and a total of at least 126 points taken during 2nd year. For entry to Fourth Year: All BSc Neuroscience 100 and 200 level papers, and a total of 126 points during 3rd year including another paper from BIOC 221 or 223, GENE 221 or 222, PHAL 211, ZOOL 223 if not already passed, and six of ANAT 335, 336, PHAL 303, PHSL 341, 342, PSYC 313, 317, 323, ZOOL 314. The specific list of papers:
  • 20. 20 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 Second Year:ANAT 242, PHSL 231, PSYC 201, and one of BIOC 221, 223, GENE 221, 222, PHAL 211, ZOOL 223 plus 54 further points including PSYC 111 if not already passed. Students are strongly recommended to include one of the following sets of papers: ANAT 241 - 243 or BIOC 221 - 223 or GENE 221 - 223 or PHAL 211, 212, or PHSL 231 - 233 or PSYC 201, 202 or ZOOL 221 - 223. PSYC 203 may be substituted for PSYC 201 in approved cases. Third Year: Six of ANAT 335, 336, PHAL 303, PHSL 341, 342, PSYC 313, 317, 323, ZOOL 314 and at least 18 further points (including a second paper from BIOC 221 or 223, GENE 221 or 222, PHAL 211, ZOOL 223 if not already passed) Fourth Year: NEUR 490 and four of ANAT 454, COSC 460, NEUR 452, 454, 455, 457, 459, 461, 462, PHAL 422, PHAL 423, PHSL 472, PSYC 469, 471, 474, 476, ZOOL 412 With the permission of the Neuroscience Director: (a) one of the following papers may be substituted for NEUR 490:ANAT 490, BIOC 490, COSC 490, PHAL 490, PHSE 491, PHSL 490, PSYC 490, ZOOL 490; (b) one of the following papers may be substituted for NEUR 462: ANAT 455, ANAT 457, COSC 470, PHAL 427, PHSL 474, PSYC 472, ZOOL 420. 6 THE NEUROSCIENCE POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMME 6.1 Choice of Course The Neuroscience Postgraduate Programme includes PGDipSci, MSc and PhD degrees. The specific point that you would enter our programme will depend on the level and content of your prior training. The relationship of the different degrees is shown in the following table. Year BSc PGDipSci MSc (1) MSc (2) BSc(Hons) PhD 1 2 3 4 * 5 6 7 8
  • 21. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 21 The fourth year course structure is very similar across the postgraduate degrees. The filled grey blocks and arrows, therefore, represent different routes that cover essentially the same material before entry to a PhD. The exception (* in the table above) is Year 4 for the two year MSc degree, where 495 (preliminary thesis work) is taken instead of a 480 or 490 research project. Both the PGDipSci and BSc(Hons) allow direct entry to PhD provided grades are sufficiently high. A PGDipSci plus one-year (thesis only) MSc is similar to a two-year MSc in terms of the papers taken but differs in including a 490 research project. For students who have a first degree in a subject other than Neuroscience, there is a DipGrad degree that combines Year 2 and Year 3 papers in a single one year course that allows entry to PGDipSci. For all thesis based courses, an important first step is to contact potential super- visors. Their research interests and email addresses are given in the Research Interests section. 6.1.1 PGDipSci Subject Requirements Entry is open to students who have a BSc degree in Neuroscience. It is a one year course. You take at least 96 points fromANAT 454, COSC 460, NEUR 452, 454, 455, 457, 459, 461, 462, PHAL 422, 423, PHSL 472, PSYC 469, 471, 474, 476, ZOOL 412 , plus NEUR 480 or NEUR 490. Notes: With the permission of the Neuroscience Programme Director: (a) one of the following can be substituted for NEUR 462: ANAT 455, 457, COSC 470, PHAL 427, PHSL 474, PSYC 472, ZOOL 420 (b) one of the following can be substituted for NEUR 480: ANAT 480, BIOC 480, COSC 480, PHAL 480, PHSE 480, PHSL 480, ZOOL 480 (c) one of the following may be substituted for NEUR 490: ANAT 490, BIOC 490, COSC 490, PHAL 490, PHSE 490, PHSL 490, PSYC 490, ZOOL 490 Choice of NEUR 480 (24 points) vs NEUR 490 (48 points): NEUR 480 is suitable for students who wish to proceed to a one year MSc, but NEUR 490 must be taken by PGDipSci students hoping to proceed directly to a PhD. NEUR 480/NEUR 490 are research projects which are submitted as a dis- sertation. The difference in points is intended to reflect different sizes and time commitments of the project work.
  • 22. 22 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 6.1.2 Two year MSc In the first year, you take at least 96 points fromANAT 454, COSC 460, NEUR 452, 454, 455, 457, 459, 461, 462, PHAL 422, 423, PHSL 472, PSYC 469, 471, 474, 476, ZOOL 412 , plus NEUR 495 Preliminary Thesis work (24 pts). The 495 paper takes slightly different forms in different Departments but generally consists of a mix of preparatory literature review and learning of specific research methods. In second year, enrol for NEUR 5 (which is the code for the thesis). Note that this is not replaced by the Departmental code. This is important so you remain enrolled as a Neuroscience student. Scholarships are available to support MSc study. Please see http://www.otago. ac.nz/study/scholarships/ for more information. 6.2 Application For Admission To PhD For information about PhD study, and the application process, see http://www. otago.ac.nz/study/phd/index.html . The application forms for admission to PhD study, both Interim and Direct, are now available in word format on the PhD website so that you can download and type directly into them. On the application form in sections B1 and B4, enter the Department of your supervisor(s). In section B5, enter the thesis enrolment code as NEUR 9. This is important so you remain enrolled as a Neuroscience student. Some PhD positions are funded through research grants held by supervisors; com- petitive individual University scholarships are also available . See http://www.otago. ac.nz/study/scholarships/postgraduate_scholarships.html for more information. 7 COURSE CONTENT 7.1 Required papers at 100-level 7.1.1 CELS 191 Cell and Molecular Biology (S1) 18 pts An introduction to the biology of cells; fundamentals of molecular biology; organ- ismal and molecular genetics; human genetic variation; diversity and biology of microorganisms; microbial virulence and disease processes. 7.1.2 HUBS 191 Human Body Systems I
  • 23. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 23 (S1) 18 pts An introduction to the structure and function of the musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine and immune systems in the human body. 7.1.3 PSYC 111 Brain and Behaviour (S1) 18 pts An introductory study of the biological bases of behaviour, developmental psy- chobiology, neuropsychology, perception and learning. 7.2 100-level papers from which a selection must be passed 7.2.1 CHEM 191  The Chemical Basis of Biology and Human Health (S1) 18 pts An introduction to the concepts of chemistry underlying important processes in biology and human health, including energetics, kinetics, equilibria and solubility, properties of water and solutions, acids, bases, complexation and electron transfer, hydrolysis, amino acids and proteins. Warning: Students who do not achieve high marks in 7th form chemistry are likely to find this paper very hard. With a bursary mark of 60% or lower you are recommended to take the summer school course Bridging Chemistry before enrolling. A tutor is also available for help while taking the paper. Be warned that internal assessment marks are usually much higher than exam marks. 7.2.2 PHSI 191 Biological Physics (S1) 18 pts Foundations of physics for the health sciences including mechanics, properties of fluids and solids, thermodynamics, optics, electrostatics and DC circuits, and radiation and health. 7.2.3 BIOC 192 Foundations of Biochemistry (S2) 18 pts An introduction to the structure and function of proteins as essential elements of life processes; principles of enzymology; introductory bioenergetics; conservation of the energy of food for body processes; digestion and catabolism of fats, proteins and carbohydrates; terminal pathways of oxidation, anaerobic and aerobic metabo- lism, mitochondrial metabolism; energy storage and utilisation; the molecular basis of disease; illustrative topics in metabolism. Prerequisite: CHEM 191 or 112 7.2.4 BIOL 112 Animal Biology
  • 24. 24 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 (S2) 18 pts An introductory survey of the evolution and diversity of animal life. Essential bio- logical principles are illustrated using examples from New Zealand fauna, issues of environmental, social or economic importance, and cutting-edge research developments at the University of Otago. 7.2.5 HUBS 192 Human Body Systems II (S2) 18 pts An introduction to the structure and function of the human cardiovascular, respi- ratory, gastrointestinal, renal/urinary and reproductive systems including organ development. Prerequisite: HUBS 191 7.3 100-level paper which forms an alternative major Note that this is not a requirement for Neuroscience. 7.3.1 PSYC 112 Human Thought and Behaviour (S2) 18 pts An introductory study of developmental psychology, social psychology, language and thought, and abnormal psychology. 7.4 Required papers at 200-level 7.4.1 PHSL 231 Neurophysiology (S1) 18 pts The mechanisms by which the nervous system integrates sensory information from the environment and co-ordinates the body’s responses at whole organism, cellular and molecular levels. Prerequisites: (HUBS 191 or BIOL 115) three of BIOC 192, 111, (BIOL 112 or HUBS 192), CELS 191, CHEM 191, 112, PHSI 191, 110, BIOL 111 7.4.2 ANAT 242 Neurobiology (S2) 18 pts The structural and functional organisation of the nervous system at cellular, tis- sue, system and integrative levels. Prerequisites: (CELS 191 or BIOL 111) (HUBS 191 or BIOL 115) 36 further points 7.4.3 PSYC 201 Brain and Cognition
  • 25. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 25 (S2) 27 pts Biopsychology, sensation and perception, and cognitive processes. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 112. For Neuroscience students PSYC 111 is sufficient 7.5 200-level papers from which a selection must be passed 7.5.1 BIOC 221 Molecular Biology (S1) 18 pts From gene to protein. How genetic information is stored and determines biological function. Principles and applications of genetic engineering. Impact of molecular biology on health, agriculture and New Zealand society. Prerequisites: CELS 191 CHEM 191 at least 36 further points 7.5.2 GENE 221 Molecular and Microbial Genetics (S1) 18 pts Mutations; genetic analysis in bacteria; mobile genetic elements; genetic analysis of regulatory circuits; DNAcloning and sequencing in genetic analysis; comparative microbial genomics; genetics and evolution of viruses of eukaryotes. Prerequisites: (CELS 191 or BIOL 111) (CHEM 191 or 112) 36 further points 7.5.3 PHAL 211 Introductory Pharmacology (S1) 18 pts The basic principles of pharmacology; how drugs get to their site of action, and how they work when they get there. Prerequisites: (BIOC 192 or 111) (CHEM 191 or 112) two of CELS 191, HUBS 191, 192, BIOL 111, 115 7.5.4 BIOC 223 Cellular Biochemistry and Metabolism (S2) 18 pts Metabolism provides the fuels and molecules for life. How metabolic processes are regulated and coordinated in animals and plants. Human disease states that arise from metabolic imbalances. Prerequisites: BIOC 192 CELS 191 CHEM 191 18 further points 7.5.5 GENE 222 Genes, Chromosomes and Populations (S2) 18 pts Eukaryote genomes and genome evolution; phylogenetics; cytogenetics and
  • 26. 26 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 chromosomes; extensions of Mendelian genetics; genetic mapping in eukaryotes; genes in populations; quantitative genetics. Prerequisites: (CELS 191 or BIOL 111) 54 further points 7.5.6 ZOOL 223 Animal Physiology (S2) 18 pts A comparative view of development, reproduction, metamorphosis, brains and sensory systems in different animal groups. Prerequisites: BIOL 112 (CELS 191 or BIOL 111) HUBS 191 7.6 200-level papers which form an alternative major Note that these papers are not required for Neuroscience. 7.6.1 ANAT 241 Human Biology: Cells to Systems (S1) 18 pts The structural and functional organisation of the human body at cellular, tissue, system and regional levels. Prerequisites: (CELS 191 or BIOL 111) (HUBS 192 or BIOL 115) 36 further points 7.6.2 PSYC 202 Social and Applied Psychology (S1) 27 pts Human factors and decision making, social psychology, and applications of psy- chological methods. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 112 7.6.3 ZOOL 221 Animal Designs for Living (S1) 18 pts The body plans of, and the relationships among, major animal phyla are exam- ined using local fauna. Three field trips generate data that is manipulated and presented in report form. Prerequisite: BIOL 112 7.6.4 ANAT 243 Reproductive and Developmental Biology (S2) 18 pts The structural and functional organisation of the male and female reproductive systems, including consideration of fertilisation, implantation, pregnancy, lactation,
  • 27. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 27 and an introduction to development. Prerequisites: (CELS 191 or BIOL 111) (HUBS 192 or BIOL 115) 36 further points 7.6.5 BIOC 222 Proteins and Biotechnology (S2) 18 pts Proteins are drivers of all life processes. The diversity of protein structure and func- tion, and how the shape of proteins determines their function. How biotechnology solves medical and industrial problems. Prerequisites: BIOC 192 CELS 191 CHEM 191 18 further points 7.6.6 GENE 223 Developmental and Applied Genetics (S2) 18 pts Developmental genetics of bacteria, yeast, animals and plants; mutant screens to investigate gene function; applications of genetically engineered plants and animals in biotechnology; safety and regulation of GE organisms. Prerequisites: (CELS 191 or BIOL 111) 54 further points 7.6.7 PHAL 212 Introductory Therapeutics and Toxicology (S2) 18 pts An introduction to both the use of drugs in the treatment of disease and the field of toxicology. Prerequisite: PHAL 211 7.6.8 PHSL 232 Cardiovascular and Respiratory Physiology (S2) 18 pts An exploration of cardiovascular and respiratory function and integration. Examples taken from health (exercise, high altitude and diving) and disease (cardiovascular/ lung disease and sleep apnea) will illustrate the principles. Prerequisites: 72 100-level points including ((HUBS 191 192) or BIOL 115) two of BIOC 192, 111, CELS 191, CHEM 191, 112, PHSI 191, 110, BIOL 111 7.6.9 PHSL 233 Cellular, Gastrointestinal and Renal Physiology    (S2) 18 pts The epithelial and integrative functions of the gastrointestinal and renal systems of the human body will be examined at the cellular and molecular levels. Examples
  • 28. 28 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 of pathophysiological conditions will be highlighted. Prerequisites: 72 100-level points including ((HUBS 191 192) or BIOL 115) two of BIOC 192, 111, CELS 191, CHEM 191, 112, PHSI 191, 110, BIOL 111 7.6.10 PSYC 203 Abnormal Psychology This paper may substitute PSYC 201 only in special cases. (S2) 18 pts Mental disorder, abnormal behaviour, individual differences, and clinical assessment. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 112 7.6.11 ZOOL 222 Evolutionary Biology (S2) 18 pts Evolutionary theory and mechanism; systematics and phylogenies; the evolution- ary record; evolutionary ecology and behavioural ecology; evolution of human social behaviour. Prerequisites: BIOL 112 (CELS 191 or BIOL 111) 7.7 300-level papers from which a selection must be passed 7.7.1 ANAT 336 Selected Topics in Neurobiology (B) 18 pts     Coordinator: Dr Stephen Bunn Department of Anatomy Structural Biology Selected topics in Neuroscience, including ANAT 335 topics studied and critiqued in greater depth. This is a library research and essay-based paper. It serves as an introduction to aspects of postgraduate research. Prerequisite: ANAT 242 or 232 7.7.2 PHSL 341 Cellular and Molecular Neurophysiology (S1) 18 pts    Coordinator: Dr Philip Sheard Department of Physiology Essential processes in neural development and signalling. Axonal growth and guidance, synaptic formation and maintenance. The resting membrane potential, action potentials, synaptic transmission and their role in memory and adaptation. The contribution of glia to neural signalling and growth. Prerequisites: PHSL 231 or (PHSL 221 222 36 100-level BIOC, CHEM or PHSI
  • 29. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 29 points) or (PHSL 223 36 100-level BIOC, CHEM or PHSI points) Essential Reading: Kandel, E. R., Schwartz, J. H., Jessell, T. M. (Eds.). (2000). Principles of neural science (4th ed.). New York, McGraw-Hill. 7.7.3 PHSL 342 Integrative Neurophysiology (S1) 18 pts Coordinator: Dr Phil Heyward Department of Physiology Integration of knowledge about genes, neurons and systems of neurons as a foundation for understanding the physiological mechanisms underlying sensory experience, movement control and selected brain disorders. Prerequisites: PHSL 231 or (PHSL 221 222 36 100-level BIOC, CHEM or PHSI points) or (PHSL 223 36 100-level BIOC, CHEM or PHSI points) Highly recommended: Kandel, E. R., Schwartz, J. H., Jessell, T. M. (Eds.). (2000). Principles of neural science (4th ed.). New York, McGraw-Hill. 7.7.4 PSYC 323 Sensation and Perception NOT OFFERED IN 2010 (S1) 18 pts Department of Psychology How the brain constructs reality: How do we transform information from the environ- ment into perceptions of the real world, including patterns, colours, movements, sounds, textures, and pains? We try to answer this question by considering physi- ological, psychophysical, anatomical, clinical, developmental, and philosophical studies of the senses. Prerequisites: PSYC 201 202. For Neuroscience students PSYC 111 is sufficient. Required Reading: Blake, R., Sekuler, R. (2006). Perception (5th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. 7.7.5 ANAT 335 Neurobiology (S2) 18 pts   Coordinator: Dr John Reynolds Department of Anatomy Structural Biology Structure and function of the normal and injured mammalian brain, including the structure of specific brain circuits and how the biology of neurons and glial cells can lead to degenerative changes. These topics will be studied using the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and medial temporal lobe to illustrate important concepts.
  • 30. 30 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010
  • 31. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 31
  • 32. 32 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 Prerequisite: ANAT 242 or 232 Highly recommended: Kandel, E. R., Schwartz, J. H., Jessell, T. M. (Eds.). (2000). Principles of neural science (4th ed.). New York, McGraw-Hill. 7.7.6 PHAL 303 Neuropharmacology (S2) 18 pts Coordinator: Dr Steve Kerr Department of Pharmacology Toxicology Mechanisms of action, uses and abuses of drugs affecting the nervous system. Prerequisite: PHAL 211, PHAL 301. With Pharmacology HOD approval, Neuro- science students may be exempt the PHAL 301 prerequisite. 7.7.7 PSYC 313 Cognition and Neuropsychology (S2) 18 pts   Instructors: Dr Liana Machado and Professor Jeffrey Miller Department of Psychology Human brain-behaviour relationships and mechanisms of attention, memory, and cognition. We will study cognitive processes, including the methods by which infor- mation is normally represented, retrieved, and used, as well as the behavioural changes that occur as a result of damage to the underlying neural machinery. Brain disease and its impact on higher cognitive functions will be examined. Topics investigated may include object recognition, face recognition, attention, problem solving, memory, language, and motor control. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 202. For Neuroscience students PSYC 111 is sufficient. Selected readings to be assigned during the course. 7.7.8 PSYC 317 Biopsychology (S2) 18 pts    Instructor: Professor Neil McNaughton Department of Psychology Evolutionary, biological and neural approaches to the understanding of mental function. This paper looks at the insights that biology can give us into the normal and abnormal mind. It focuses in particular on emotion and memory. In both of these areas of psychology, detailed biological (and even molecular) analysis can give us deep insights into the way the mind works and the way that brain function supports the mind. Students with little background in biology or physical science may find its more biological aspects difficult. Students with little background in psychology may find its more psychological aspects difficult. Background material
  • 33. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 33 is provided to help in both cases. Students who have not done 200-level psychol- ogy will need to take particular care to follow the instructions provided on how to write the two experimental reports that constitute the internal assessment. Prerequisites: PSYC 201 202. For Neuroscience students PSYC 111 is sufficient. Required Reading: Pinel, J. P. (2009). Biopsychology (7th ed.). Boston: Allyn Bacon. Additional readings are provided and all the course material is provided electronically via BlackBoard. 7.7.9 ZOOL 314 Neurobiology (S2) 18 pts Instructors: Professor Alison Mercer and Associate Professor Mike Paulin Department of Zoology The comparative approach exploits the diversity of animal nervous systems to explore principles of nervous system function. Animals evolved from a common ancestor which lived about a billion years ago. This animal had an organized nervous system whose components and design underpin the wide diversity of animal nervous systems we see today. We will look at how brains evolve, develop and learn; how animals perceive the world; movement control; the neurochemical modulation of behaviour; memory mechanisms; and we will look at how computer simulations can be used to explore how the behaviour of animals depends on the behaviour of neurons. In recent years, studies of interesting particular systems, such as the auditory systems of barn owls or the olfactory systems of honeybees, have provided fascinating information about how neurons and brains work. The course is 40% internally assessed, including an essay and a practical project. Prerequisite: 54 200-level points from Science Schedule C Recommended Reading: Carew, T. J. (2000). Behavioral neurobiology: the cellular organization of natural behavior. Sinauer Associates, Inc., ISBN 0-87893-084-1. 7.8 400-level papers 7.8.1 ANAT 454 Neurobiology (F) 24 pts Instructors: Dr Joanna Williams, Dr Greg Anderson and Dr Ruth Napper Department of Anatomy Structural Biology This course aims to expand knowledge of selected areas in neurobiology, while developing skills appropriate for scientific research. ANAT454 comprises three modules. Each discusses a specific research area (e.g. Molecular Neurobiology, Brain injury, Alcohol and brain development) and will emphasise different core
  • 34. 34 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 research skills. Assessment: This course is fully internally assessed. There will be an assessment associated with each module, which combined will total 60% . This is followed by an end of semester assessment in which students will prepare a research proposal (40%). 7.8.2 COSC 460 Neural Networks (F) 24 pts    Instructor: Associate Professor Anthony Robins Department of Computer Science Students intending to take this course must have experience of computer programming. Neural networks are a family of methods based on ‘brain-like’ computing, giving us a different perspective on computation and complex tasks such as vision, natural language and learning. Despite its slow “hardware”, the brain is a much more powerful and sophisticated computational system than any computer ever built. What can the brain teach us about computation and how to perform complex tasks such as natural language processing, vision and control and optimisation problems? Neural networks are a family of computational methods that try to address these issues and explore “brain-like” computation, information processing and learning. Lectures in this paper will cover: an introduction to neural networks; a survey of systems including basic architectures (linear associators, back propagation, Boltzmann machines, competitive learning) and more recent systems; supervised, unsupervised and reinforcement learning; new computer architectures; and practical applications of neural networks. Readings will be taken from a variety of sources. 7.8.3 NEUR 452 Neurodegenerative Disorders NOT OFFERED IN 2010 (F) 24 pts    Instructor: Associate Professor Ian McLennan Department of Anatomy Structural Biology This paper will cover selected topic relating to the causes of neurodegenerative disease, such as motor neuron and Parkinson’s disease. The emphasis will be on the cellular aspects of these conditions, with a bias toward understanding the molecular mechanisms that given the survival and function of neurons. Assess-
  • 35. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 35 ment is 100% internal. 7.8.4 NEUR 454 Systems Neurophysiology (F) 24 pts    Instructor: Associate Professor Brian Hyland Department of Physiology Note: renamed for 2010. All students enrolling for NEUR 454 MUST have the enrolment form initialled in the “Department signature” column by Associate Professor Hyland. This paper covers selected topics in the central nervous system control of move- ment, with emphasis on the contribution made by recent advances in methods of obtaining and analysing single cell recording data from behaving animals. Course work consists of lectures and seminars. Assessment is 100% internal and is via four essays written in the style of scientific review articles exploring in depth the recent literature on specific areas. 7.8.5 NEUR 455 Sleep (F) 24 pts   Instructor: Dr Barbara Galland Department of Women’s and Children’s Health (Paediatric section) Note: renamed for 2010. This course will cover sleep organisation, sleep-wake regulation, maturational changes related to sleep, and studies of selected sleep disorders. There will be an emphasis on core research skills for recording sleep and measuring behavioural manifestations of disturbed sleep with a particular focus on the infant, child, and adolescent. There will be opportunities for literature research into the theories regarding the function of sleep. To be run as an informal series of lectures, seminars, discussions, and written assignments with 100% internal assessment. 7.8.6 NEUR 457 Developmental Neuroscience (F) 24 pts   Convenor: Dr Christine Jasoni Department of Anatomy Structural Biology Note: renamed for 2010. This paper will cover selected topics in the development of the vertebrate nervous system. The content will be covered with an emphasis on new technologies and animal models, and with an eye toward understanding how current knowledge might contribute to strategies for repair or regeneration
  • 36. 36 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 of faulty or damaged nervous systems. 7.8.7 NEUR 459 Neuroendocrinology (F) 24 pts   Instructors: Professor David Grattan and Dr Stephen Bunn Department of Anatomy Structural Biology This paper will examine the interactions between hormones and the brain. We will examine the control of the endocrine system by the brain and the reciprocal effects of hormones on brain structure and function. Specific topics of interest will be selected by mutual agreement between the students and the instructors, and will be covered in a series of informal discussions held approximately every two weeks. Emphasis will be placed on the use of current research publications. Assessment: 50% of the final grade will be internally assessed and 50% assessed in a final examination at the end of the year. 7.8.8 NEUR 461 Clinical Neurology (F) 24 pts     Coordinator: Dr Graeme Hammond-Tooke Department of Neurology An introduction to clinical neurology. There is no final written examination for this course. Assessment is 100% internal and will be based on the writing of three extensive reviews on recent advances in the literature on neurological disorders. 7.8.9 NEUR 462 Special Topic Special topics can be agreed upon between student instructor, with approval of the Director. Substitutions can include ANAT 455, ANAT 457, COSC 470, PHAL 427, PHSL 474, PSYC 472 (not offered in 2010), ZOOL 420 (not offered in 2010). In 2010, one specific special topic is being offered: NEUR 462 Neuroethics (F) 24 pts Instructors:ProfessorGrantGillettandAssociateProfessorElizabethFranz Otago Bioethics Centre and Department of Psychology The course will look at the vexed issues of consciousness, human identity, free will and moral responsibility and moral judgment in the light of research in neuro- science that illuminates these topics. We will cover such things as the role of mirror neurones in empathy, reduced states of consciousness and the value of human life, the allegation that acts of the will are an illusion based on the unconscious
  • 37. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 37 workings of the brain and the relationship between brain activity and moral think- ing. The students will be expected to lead the sessions based on assigned read- ing and presentations will then be submitted and marked as part of the in-course assessment. The students will be expected to critically engage with the literature. 7.8.10 PHAL 423 Neuropharmacology (F) 24 pts     Instructor: Dr Steve Kerr Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology In this journal club format paper we assess the neuropharmacology of important CNS disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, spinal injury and stroke, and drugs that may control or cure these diseases. Special emphasis is placed on future and novel pharmacological strategies. 7.8.11 PHSL 472 Neurophysiology (F) 24 pts     Convenor: Dr Ruth Empson Department of Physiology A seminar series exploring research frontiers in physiology by study of contem- porary papers from the scientific literature in each topic area. 7.8.12 PSYC 469 Human Information Processing (F) 24 pts       Instructor: Professor Geoff White Department of Psychology Information processing is a metaphor that describes our ability to act and make decisions on the basis of complex environmental and social information. Much of the information is not present at the time and relies on memory. Sometimes it can be integrated in a glance and without awareness, and at other times the processing requires effort. Is our memory a reconstruction of the past or does it reflect the structure of the environment? Are older memories more resistant to interference? How can we know the time of occurrence of a personally experienced episode? Does our ability to process information deteriorate with age? What are the best models for decision making and remembering, and how can we apply them to everyday life? Can we apply what is known about attention and memory to enhance study and learning? Reading: Original journal articles and reviews. 7.8.13 PSYC 471 Cognitive Neuroscience
  • 38. 38 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 (F) 24 pts Instructor:AssociateProfessorElizabethFranz Department of Psychology How networks of neurons within the brain support cognitive processes. As a key question in cognitive psychology relates to how knowledge is represented or coded within a brain, a major goal of cognitive neuroscience is to provide an account of “representation” using the language of neural processing. To this purpose, research approaches range from investigations of the behavioural cor- relates of single cell activity to elucidation of putative neural circuits based on neuropsychological data and scanning studies of whole brain activity. In this paper we will examine contemporary research in this area. Classwork will consist of a guided reading approach. Professor Grant Gillett contributes as a guest lecturer who provides first-hand neurosurgical experience and philosophical perspectives and approaches to the topics covered. Note: Admission requires an average grade of B in 300-level PSYC papers and satisfactory performance in PSYC 311. Reading: Original articles and reviews as assigned. 7.8.14 PSYC 474 Nervous System Plasticity (F) 24 pts Instructor: Professor Cliff Abraham Department of Psychology In this paper we investigate the neural mechanisms of learning and memory, with particular emphasis on the physiological, biochemical, and anatomical changes which underlie information storage. Model systems of study include the mammalian hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and amygdala plus invertebrates. Class meetings, consisting of lectures, student presentations, and discussions, will be held once a week. Prior completion of PSYC 317, PHSL 341 or an equivalent neuroscience paper is highly recommended as preparation for this paper. Internal assessment is based largely on student presentations, an essay on a seminar topic, a test, and a brief research proposal. Readings will consist of original journal articles plus reviews. Note: Admission requires an average grade of B in 300-level PSYC papers and satisfactory performance in PSYC 311.
  • 39. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 39 7.8.15 ZOOL 412 Neurobiology and Behaviour (S2) 24 pts Instructors: Associate Professors Alison Mercer and Mike Paulin Department of Zoology Examination of neural basis of perception and behaviour in animals. Advantages and limitations of a simple systems approach for studying brain function. There are remarkable similarities in nervous system structure and function between animals as different as fruit flies (Drosophila) and humans. This pattern of diversity superimposed upon common underlying themes provides fascinating opportunities to explore and test ideas about brain function. Do fruit flies get Alzheimer’s dis- ease? Do sharks have episodic memory? We will have weekly meetings to discuss recent publications and future possibilities. Grading is based on oral contributions to the meetings, plus two major written reports on issues raised in the meetings. 7.8.16 NEUR 480 Dissertation 24 pts The NEUR 480 dissertation is available for the 120 pt PGDipSci and is similar to the 490 dissertation except it involves half the workload. Students intending to proceed directly to PhD should take NEUR 490 to make their PGDipSci up to 144 pts. See description of 490 for further details. For PGDipSci regulations see Section 6.1.1. 7.8.17 NEUR 490 Dissertation 48 pts 7.8.17.1 Introduction The dissertation is the result of a piece of supervised original research. Please use the 490 code of your supervisor, i.e. of the Department in which you will carry out the research. The work should aim to be of a quality which would allow publica- tion in an international journal. But it will generally only be of sufficient quantity to form part of such a publication. 7.8.17.2 Dissertation Production The dissertation should normally be laid out in the same general manner as an international journal article or MSc thesis, be typed and be spiral bound (or the equivalent) with clear plastic covers. Specific format details of the thesis, deadlines and examination will be as for other students of the supervisor’s Department. 7.8.17.3 Workload and Supervision The dissertation is assessed as the weight of two papers.As such it should involve an average of about 16 hours per week throughout the academic year, including
  • 40. 40 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 time spent in reading literature, analysing data and so forth (NEUR 480 should involve an average of 8 hours per week). Approximately two-thirds of the working time should be taken up in preliminary reading and experimental work and one third in data analysis and thesis preparation - this will vary from Department to Department and project to project. The format and examining of the thesis should be as for other 480/490 theses in the relevant Department and is examined together with them. The student should expect to meet with their supervisor at least once a week. Most Departments should also be able to provide desk space for the student in addition to the facilities required specifically for the project. The project should be of such a type that conclusive results can be expected which will allow the student to frame at least tentative conclusions with respect to a specific research question. 7.8.17.4 Supervisors and Projects A supervisor can be any member of staff or other qualified person within the University or hospital who has been approved by the Neuroscience Programme Director and who has agreed to supervise the specific project. Staff willing to supervise research projects in Neuroscience, together with a description of their general area of interest or proposed projects are listed in Section 8. If you think you are interested in any particular area you should discuss the matter further with the person concerned. For help in choosing a supervisor contact the Director. Neither the project nor the supervisor need be limited to those listed in Section 8. Topic areas and supervisors listed are appropriate for NEUR 480, NEUR 490, MSc and PhD research. 8 SUPERVISION / RESEARCH INTERESTS OF STAFF 8.1 Anatomy Structural Biology For more information about the Department please visit http://www.otago.ac.nz/anatomy . 8.1.1 Dr Greg Anderson The neuroendocrine control of reproduction. The current focus is the effects of
  • 41. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 41 leptin, prolactin and the recently-discovered gonadotrophin-inhibitory hormone on mammalian reproduction, and the cell signalling pathways used by these hor- mones in the hypothalamus. Email: greg.anderson@anatomy.otago.ac.nz http://www.otago.ac.nz/neuroendocrinology 8.1.2 Dr Stephen Bunn The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for hormone synthesis and release from neuroendocrine cells. Research employs isolated neuronal and neuroendocrine cells maintained in cell culture to determine how individual cells respond to and integrate multiple inputs to generate an appropriate secretory response. Current research is focussed on determining how signals derived from the immune system influence neuroendocrine responses. This research programme is conducted within the University of Otago, Centre for Neuroendo- crinology. Email: stephen.bunn@anatomy.otago.ac.nz http://www.otago.ac.nz/neuroendocrinology 8.1.3 Dr Marilyn Duxson The development of muscle and motoneurons. I am particularly interested in the very early stages of muscle development and how the muscle and motor nerve interact, and control each others development, during the time when the muscle is still forming. Email: marilyn.duxson@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.1.4 Professor David Grattan The neuroendocrine control of reproduction, in particular the regulation of neuro- nal structure and function by reproductive hormones. The neurological and neu- roendocrine adaptations of the maternal brain. Hyperprolactinemia and infertility. Email: dave.grattan@anatomy.otago.ac.nz http://www.otago.ac.nz/neuroendocrinology 8.1.5 Dr Christine Jasoni Our lab is interested in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the navigation of axons from the basal forebrain. A number of physi- ologically important neuroendocrine cells reside in this region, including gona- dotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, that control mammalian fertility. In addition, this is a pathologically important brain region because it contains cholinergic neurons that become lesioned in Alzheimer’s disease. Our long-term
  • 42. 42 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 goals are to understand the mechanisms that axons use to navigate to their cor- rect target so we can repair faulty brain wiring that results from inborn errors or injury. To address questions about axon navigation during development, we use a combination of cell culture, histochemical and molecular biology techniques, live imaging of moving growth cones, and transgenic mouse models. There are several projects available to summer students as well as students desiring longer-term projects, including honours and PhD. Keen students are encouraged to contact me to learn more, and to discuss their scientific interests, so we can match you to an appropriate project. Email: christine.jasoni@anatomy.otago.ac.nz http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/research/devel_neuroendo/index.html 8.1.6 Dr Beulah Leitch Cellular neuroscience, focusing on the structural and functional development of neurons and their synapses; and also the mechanisms by which chemical mes- sengers modulate the excitable properties of neurones and regulate the strength of synaptic transmission. Research Projects include: Effect of Stargazin-induced BDNF Deficits on Synaptic Plasticity in the Cerebellum of the Stargazer Mouse; Identification of Calcium Channels in Hippocampal Neurones. The experimental techniques used include, electron-microscopy, molecular biology, immunocyto- chemistry, immunogold labelling, confocal microscopy, and electrophysiology. Email: beulah.leitch@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.1.7 Dr Ping Liu Major research areas are: (i) Neurobiological basis of aging, with a particular focus on age-associated learning and memory impairments; and (ii) Biological basis of learning and memory. A combination of behavioural, neurochemical, molecular biological, immunohistochemical and electrophysiological approaches is being used. Email: ping.liu@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.1.8 Associate Professor Ian McLennan We have discovered a regulator of the brain, which is involved in the generation of sexual dimorphism during development and the maintenance of neurons in both sexes.  The therapeutic potential of the regulator is being investigated, as well the underlying basic biology. We therefore study both humans and GM mice, using behavioural studies and a broad range of cellular and molecular analyses of post-mortem tissues. Email: ian.mclennan@stonebow.otago.ac.nz
  • 43. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 43 8.1.9 Dr Ruth Napper Effects of alcohol during fetal development on the structure of the brain; investi- gations of the long term behavioural effects of alcohol induced cell death with a focus on the forebrain. Email: ruth.napper@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.1.10 Associate Professor Dorothy Oorschot Structure and function of the normal or hypoxic basal ganglia. In the normal basal ganglia, neural circuits are being researched to test hypotheses on the cellular basis of movement and learning. For the hypoxic basal ganglia, treatments are being researched to determine whether striatal neurons can be rescued from hypoxic-induced death. Stereological methods underpin this research. These methods are also being used to test hypotheses about Huntington’s Disease. Email: dorothy.oorschot@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.1.11 Dr John Reynolds Reward-related learning and memory mechanisms in the mammalian brain, with a particular interest in the role of neuromodulators in the normal functioning of the striatum of the basal ganglia. Techniques include electrophysiological, immu- nohistochemical, molecular biological and behavioural approaches to plasticity in the striatum and cortex of the intact brain in vivo. Email: john.reynolds@stonebow.otago.ac.nz http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/research/basal-ganglia/ 8.1.12 Dr Joanna Williams This research team applies the tools of molecular biology to understand how the brain functions. The major goal is to understand how nerve cells in the brain adapt when memories are formed. As aging, brain trauma and neurological dis- eases result in deterioration of memories and have catastrophic affects both to the individual affected and society as a whole, it is important to understand the molecular steps involved in the maintenance of memories. Email: joanna.williams@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.1.13 Dr Ming Zhang Development of skeletal muscle with a particular interest in the cellular pattern- ing of myogenic cells. Clinical anatomy of vascular structures and deep fasciae. Email: zhang.ming@stonebow.otago.ac.nz
  • 44. 44 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 8.2 Biochemistry For more information about the Department please visit http://www.otago.ac.nz/biochemistry . 8.2.1 Dr Stephanie Hughes The Neural Development and Disease group studies the generation, mainte- nance and diseases associated with upper motor neurons. Specifically, we are interested in the function of the transcription factor, Fezf2, a molecule that is essential for the development, and perhaps maintenance of cortical spinal motor neurons. Our lab uses a variety of approaches to understand the molecular regu- lation of Fezf2 including neural stem cell and neuronal cell cultures, animal mod- els and lentiviral mediated gene transfer and knockdown. Email: stephanie.hughes@stonebow.otago.ac.nz http://biochem.otago.ac.nz/staff/hughes/shughes.html 8.2.2 Professor Warren Tate Molecular aspects of long term storage of information in the brain. Email: warren.tate@stonebow.otago.ac.nz http://biochem.otago.ac.nz/staff/tate/wtate.html 8.3 Computer Science For more information about the Department please visit http://www.cs.otago.ac.nz/ . 8.3.1 Dr Lubica Benuskova Dr Benuskova is a member of the AI Research Group and she is associated with the University of Otago Research Theme on Memory: mechanisms, proc- essses and applications. Email: lubica@cs.otago.ac.nz http://www.cs.otago.ac.nz/homepages/lubica/index.html 8.3.2 Dr Alistair Knott I’m a computational linguist, with a background in cognitive psychology. I am interested in exploring the hypothesis that an account of natural language syn- tax can be grounded in a model of sensorimotor cognition. One of the ways I am investigating this hypothesis is by developing a neural network simulation of visually-guided reach actions, informed by the psychological literature on visual attention and motor control.
  • 45. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 45 Email: alik@cs.otago.ac.nz http://www.cs.otago.ac.nz/staff/ali.html 8.3.3 Associate Professor Anthony Robins My main areas of teaching and research are neural networks and artificial intel- ligence. I am particularly interested in neural networks as a tool for modeling cognition. My current research is focused on the problem known as “catastrophic forgetting” (the stability / plasticity dilemma) in neural networks, and whether the “pseudorehearsal” solution that I propose has anything to do with the consolida- tion of learning during sleep in humans. Email: anthony@cs.otago.ac.nz http://www.cs.otago.ac.nz/staff/anthony.html 8.4 Neurology 8.4.1 Dr Nick Cutfield Vestibular neurology, eye movements, functional MRI. Email: nick.cutfield@otagodhb.govt.nz 8.4.2 Dr Vic du Plessis General neurology and rehabilitation. Medicolegal neurology. Email: vic.dp@healthotago.co.nz 8.4.3 Dr Graeme Hammond-Tooke Functional MRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke, synaesthesia and conversion syndrome. Experimental toxic neuropathy. Clinical neuromyol- ogy. Email: GraemeH@healthotago.co.nz 8.4.4 Dr John Mottershead General neurology and multiple sclerosis. Email: john.mottershead@healthotago.co.nz 8.4.5 Dr Alan Wright Neuromuscular disease, in particular diabetic neuropathy. Clinical neurophar- macology. Email: AlanWr@healthotago.co.nz
  • 46. 46 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 8.5 Otago Bioethics Centre 8.5.1 Professor Grant Gillett Research in the philosophy of neuroscience with particular interest in theoretical critiques of models in memory, cognitive function and perception and attempts to reconcile philosophical and neuroscientific work in thought and language. Mech- anisms and measures of recovery from spinal cord damage. Email: grant.gillett@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.6 Ophthalmology 8.6.1 Professor Tony Molteno Application of modern neurophysiological research findings to the treatment of strabismus and amblyopia in children. A substantial population of normal and abnormal children pass through the eye Department each year and their parents are usually more than happy to cooperate in research projects aimed at improv- ing the overall outcome. Email: acb.molteno@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.7 Paediatrics 8.7.1 Dr Barbara Galland Respiratory, cardiovascular and sleep physiology with a particular focus on Sud- den Infant Death Syndrome and sleep related breathing disorders in children. Email: barbara.galland@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.7.2 Professor Barry Taylor Sleep and its disorders in children and youth. In particular, the prevention of sleep disorders and the understanding of Sudden unexpected death during sleep in infancy. Professor Taylor also has a clinical practice that involves analysis of home and hospital sleep studies. Email: barry.taylor@otago.ac.nz 8.8 Pharmacology Toxicology   For more information about the Department please visit http://phal.otago.ac.nz/ .
  • 47. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 47 8.8.1 Associate Professor Cynthia Darlington Neural basis of tinnitus; drug treatments for tinnitus; cognitive impairment follow- ing inner ear damage. Email: cynthia.darlington@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.8.2 Dr Steve Kerr Bioassay and mechanisms of action of marine, terrestrial and fungal neurotoxins; investigations of age-related changes in glutamate receptor function and toxin sensitivity; mechanisms of CNS neuroprotection and the supersensitivity of the aged brain to excitotoxic insult; cardiac damage following seizures. Email: steve.kerr@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.8.3 Dr Ivan Sammut Profiling cardio-renal and CNS damage in ischaemic disease. Development of novel therapeutic interventions. Email: ivan.sammut@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.8.4 Professor Paul Smith Lesion-induced plasticity in the vestibular and auditory systems; tinnitus; effects of vestibular and auditory damage on the hippocampus. Email: paul.smith@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.9 Physical Education For more information about the Department please visit http://physed.otago.ac.nz/ . 8.9.1 Dr Jonathan Shemmell Neural mechanisms underlying motor learning and recovery from neurological injury, with a focus on induced plasticity within motor cortical areas. Interactions between spinal and supraspinal neural elements in the regulation of limb stability. Email: jon.shemmell@otago.ac.nz http://physed.otago.ac.nz/staff/jshemmell.html 8.10 Physiology For more information about the Department please visit http://phsl.otago.ac.nz/ .
  • 48. 48 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 8.10.1 Dr Istvan Abraham Non-classical estrogen action in the central nervous system Email: istvan.abraham@otago.ac.nz http://phsl.otago.ac.nz/abraham 8.10.2 Dr Chris Bolter Nervous control of the heart and circulation; cardiac and vascular afferent inner- vation. Email: chris.bolter@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.10.3 Dr Colin Brown The neuroendocrine control of reproduction, in particular the regulation of oxy- tocin neuron function, which controls delivery of the offspring at birth, and deliv- ery of milk for the newborn. Oxytocin and vasopressin (anti-diuretic hormone) neuron control of body weight, fluid balance and blood pressure. Email: colin.brown@otago.ac.nz http://www.neuroendocrinology.otago.ac.nz/ 8.10.4 Dr Rebecca Campbell The central nervous system regulation of fertility and the central defects that con- tribute to infertility. Projects in my laboratory revolve around: i) defining neuronal inputs and their relative importance in GnRH neuron function, ii) understand- ing the functional role of the GnRH neuron dendrite, and iii) defining the central causes and consequences of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Email: rebecca.campbell@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.10.5 Associate Professor Pat Cragg Control of breathing. Email: pat.cragg@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.10.6 Dr Ged Davis Reflex control of the cardiovascular and renal systems in health and disease (hypertension, obesity, diabetes). Email: gerard.davis@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.10.7 Dr Ruth Empson
  • 49. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 49 Ca2+ Signalling at Synapses. Adequate and versatile control of intracellular Ca2+ levels is critical for synapse function and neuronal survival. For this reason, neurons rely upon a variety of mechanisms, often called the Ca2+ “toolkit”, to ensure strict control of intracel- lular Ca2+ levels. A key component of the toolkit is the Ca2+ pump, a plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase (PMCA) that pumps Ca2+ from the cytosol back into the extracellular space, at the cost of ATP. Recent findings also indicate that the PMCA may be more than simply a pump. Our recent work shows that PMCA2 interacts with a variety of signalling complexes at synapses and that this may underlie certain forms of synapse plasticity. Transgenic mice lacking PMCA2 exhibit ataxia (loss of controlled movement) and our recent work shows that PMCA2 influences the timing of the circuitry responsible for the “error correction” function of the cerebellum. As part of a multidisciplinary team you will have the opportunity to develop skills in the following areas to answer important questions about the contribution of PMCA to Ca2+ signalling at synapses: cellular and synapse electrophysiology, Ca2+ imaging, cell culture, confocal immunocytochemistry, synapse signalling, biochemistry and proteomics. Email: ruth.empson@stonebow.otago.ac.nz http://phsl.otago.ac.nz/staff/empson.html 8.10.8 Professor Allan Herbison Neural mechanisms underlying the control of fertility and the manner in which gonadal steroid hormones influence brain function. Email: allan.herbison@stonebow.otago.ac.nz http://www.otago.ac.nz/herbisonlab/ 8.10.9 Dr Phil Heyward Synaptic interactions and membrane properties of brain neurons involved in the sense of smell. Actions of drugs used to treat depression, epilepsy, and bipolar disorder on brain circuits and neurons. Email: phil.heyward@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.10.10 Associate Professor Brian Hyland Investigations into (1) brain systems involved in control of movement, including in animal models of human movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and
  • 50. 50 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 (2) the reward and learning-related functions of the midbrain dopamine neurons and related structures. Email: brian.hyland@stonebow.otago.ac.nz http://phsl.otago.ac.nz/staff/hyland.html 8.10.11 Dr Philip Sheard Examination of motoneuron/muscle fibre relationships during development, age- ing, and regeneration. Investigation of the underlying causes of age-related mus- cle weakness. Email: phil.sheard@stonebow.otago.ac.nz http://phsl.otago.ac.nz/staff/sheard.html 8.11 Psychological Medicine For more information about the Department please visit http://www.otago.ac.nz/dsm/psychmed . 8.11.1 Professor Paul Glue Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics; central receptor challenge paradigms; development of novel therapeutic agents; affective disorders. Email: paul.glue@otago.ac.nz 8.11.2 Dr Richard Mullen Delusions and other abnormal beliefs, insight into mental disorder, descriptive psychopathology, schizophrenia, abnormal illness behaviour and compulsory treatment. Email: richard.mullen@stonebow.otago.ac.nz 8.12 Psychology For more information about the Department please visit http://www.otago.ac.nz/psychology . 8.12.1 Professor Cliff Abraham Neural mechanisms of learning and memory, long-term potentiation, cellular and molecular events underlying nervous system plasticity, Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. Email: cabraham@psy.otago.ac.nz
  • 51. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 51 http://psy.otago.ac.nz/staff/abraham.html 8.12.2 Associate Professor David Bilkey The biological basis of memory. The role of the temporal and prefrontal cortex in memory, spatial processing and decision-making. Hippocampal dysfunction and schizophrenia. Email: dbilkey@psy.otago.ac.nz http://psy.otago.ac.nz/staff/bilkey.html 8.12.3 Associate Professor Mike Colombo The effects of brain damage on behaviour; the role of visual cortex and hip- pocampus in the processing and retention of visual and spatial information; the neural basis of cognition: the neural basis of gambling behaviour. Email: colombo@psy.otago.ac.nz http://psy.otago.ac.nz/staff/colombo.html 8.12.4 Associate Professor Elizabeth Franz Neural mechanisms of complex coordinated actions in humans. Cognitive and neural processes are studied in neurological patient populations and in the nor- mal brain, using fMRI and EEG. Our primary focus is on action selection and inhibition of competing information, with the basal-ganglia-frontal circuits making up our main regions of interest. Email: lfranz@psy.otago.ac.nz http://psy.otago.ac.nz/staff/franz.html 8.12.5 Professor Harlene Hayne Development of learning and memory in infancy and early childhood; infant cog- nition; developmental psychobiology; adolescent risk-taking. Email: hayne@psy.otago.ac.nz http://psy.otago.ac.nz/staff/hayne.html 8.12.6 Professor Neil McNaughton The neuropsychology of anxiety and amnesia. Functions of the septo-hippocam- pal system and prefrontal cortex. The effects of anxiolytic drugs and antidepres- sants on neural activity and behaviour in rats and human beings. Subcortical control of rhythmic activity in the cortex. The Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of human personality. Email: nmcn@psy.otago.ac.nz
  • 52. 52 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 http://psy.otago.ac.nz/staff/mcnaughton.html 8.12.7 Dr Liana Machado Neuropsychology, visual attention, automaticity and control. Email: liana@psy.otago.ac.nz http://psy.otago.ac.nz/staff/machado.html 8.12.8 Dr Bruce Mockett Email: mockettb@psy.otago.ac.nz 8.12.9 Professor Jeff Miller Cognitive psychology and psychophysiology, visual perception and attention, human information processing, reaction time models, statistical methods. Email: miller@psy.otago.ac.nz http://psy.otago.ac.nz/staff/miller.html 8.12.10 Dr Janice Murray Visual cognition: face and object recognition, visual attention, face perception and aging. Email: jmur@psy.otago.ac.nz http://psy.otago.ac.nz/staff/murray.html 8.12.11 Professor Geoff White Memory and discrimination processes in animals, human memory. Email: kgwhite@psy.otago.ac.nz http://psy.otago.ac.nz/staff/white.html 8.13 Zoology For more information about the Department please visit http://www.otago.ac.nz/zoology . 8.13.1 Professor Alison Mercer Modulatory actions of dopamine and serotonin in the developing nervous sys- tem; Structural and functional plasticity of the insect brain. Email: alison.mercer@stonebow.otago.ac.nz http://www.otago.ac.nz/zoology/staff/academic/mercer.html
  • 53. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 53 8.13.2 Associate Professor Mike Paulin Neurophysiology and computer modelling of sensation, perception and sen- sory-motor coordination. Current projects include prey detection and navigation using the electric sense in sharks, perception of balance and movement in bull- frogs, cerebellar models for robotic applications, and 3D interactive graphics for research and teaching applications in neurobiology. Email: mike.paulin@stonebow.otago.ac.nz http://www.otago.ac.nz/zoology/staff/academic/paulin.html 9 ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF STAFF For further details of research interests, email addresses and web pages see Departmental listings in Section 8. For academic qualifications see Section 4. Wickliffe C. Abraham Psychology Istvan Abraham Physiology Greg M. Anderson Anatomy Structural Biology Lubica Benuskova Computer Science David K. Bilkey Psychology Christopher P. Bolter Physiology Colin Brown Physiology Stephen J. Bunn Anatomy Structural Biology Rebecca Campbell Physiology Mike Colombo Psychology Patricia A. Cragg Physiology Nick Cutfield Neurology Cynthia Darlington Pharmacology Toxicology Gerard Davis Physiology Vic du Plessis Neurology Marilyn J. Duxson Anatomy Structural Biology Ruth M. Empson Physiology Elizabeth A. Franz Psychology Barbara Galland Paediatrics
  • 54. 54 Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 Grant R. Gillett Bioethics Centre Paul W. Glue Psychological Medicine David Grattan Anatomy Structural Biology Graeme D. Hammond-Tooke Neurology Harlene Hayne Psychology Allan Herbison Physiology Phil Heyward Physiology Brian I. Hyland Physiology Stephanie Hughes Biochemistry Christine L. Jasoni Anatomy Structural Biology D. Steven Kerr Pharmacology Toxicology Alistair Knott Computer Science Beulah Leitch Anatomy Structural Biology Ping Liu Anatomy Structural Biology Ian S. McLennan Anatomy Structural Biology Neil McNaughton Psychology Liana Machado Psychology Alison R. Mercer Zoology Jeffrey O. Miller Psychology Bruce Mockett Psychology Anthony C. B. Molteno Ophthalmology John Mottershead Neurology Richard Mullen Psychological Medicine Janice Murray Psychology Ruth M. A. Napper Anatomy Structural Biology Dorothy E. Oorschot Anatomy Structural Biology Michael G. Paulin Zoology John Reynolds Anatomy Structural Biology Anthony V. Robins Computer Science Ivan Sammut Pharmacology Toxicology Philip Sheard Physiology Jon Shemmell Physical Education
  • 55. Neuroscience Programme Course Handbook 2010 55 Paul F. Smith Pharmacology Toxicology Warren P. Tate Biochemistry Barry J. Taylor Paediatrics K. Geoffrey White Psychology Joanna Williams Anatomy Structural Biology Alan Wright Neurology Ming Zhang Anatomy Structural Biology

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