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  1. 1. YORK UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES Proposal for a Type 2 Diploma in Neuroscience within the Graduate Programs of Biology, Kinesiology and Health Science and Psychology Submitted to the Ontario Council of Graduate Studies ???????????14 January 2008 PartVOLUME I: The DiplomaProgram
  2. 2. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION...............................................................................................................3 1.1 The Discipline of Neuroscience ..................................................................................3 1.2 Neuroscience in Ontario 1.3 Rationale for a Diploma in Neuroscience at York.......................................................3 2. REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPLETION...........................................................................5 2.1 Summary of requirements............................................................................................5 2.2 First requirement..........................................................................................................5 2.3 Second requirement ..................................................................................................56 2.4 Third requirement......................................................................................................57 2.5 Fourth requirement....................................................................................................67 2.6 Fifth requirement…………………………………………………………………..68 3. CORE FACULTY ………………………………………………………………………...78 Table 1 …………………………………………………………………………...89 4. ADMINISTRATION … .. ………………………………………………….. ……………....10 11 4.1 Steering Committee…………………………………………………………………. 1011 4.2 Admissions Process ………………………………………………………………101 4.3 Record of Admission and Completion of Requirements……………………….....101 4.4 Resources………………………………………………………………………….112 APPENDIX A…………………………………………………………………………….123 APPENDIX B…………………………………………………………………………….189 2
  3. 3. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 The Discipline of Neuroscience Neuroscience is the multidisciplinary study of the nervous system. It ranges from research on molecular and cellular mechanisms in nerve cells and the relationship between the elements of neural systems, to the study of behavior of whole organisms. Neuroscience is perhaps the most rapidly expanding field of science in the past decade; for example, approximately 30,000 people now attend the annual Society for Neuroscience MMeeting. Neuroscientists can be found in departments of anatomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, kinesiology, mathematics, pharmacology, philosophy, physiology, psychology and zoology, as well as a variety of medical and health profession departments. This broad range means that students often specialize in specific areas of neuroscience but, at the very least, are likely to be exposed to molecular and cell biology, neural systems and cognitive/behavioral neuroscience. Graduate programs in neuroscience, whether they are certificates, specializations, or degrees, typically offer a small number of core neuroscience courses that are team taught by faculty from the various departments affiliated with the program. 1.2 Neuroscience in Ontario Ontario universities are widely recognized for their strength in neuroscience. F; for example, the first annual National Canadian Neuroscience Meeting was is being held in Toronto during May 2007. Neuroscience at the graduate level in Ontario is offered by a number of universities at both the Masters and PhD levels. These offerings generally follow the collaborative model mentioned above. Universities with medical training schools, such as the University of Toronto, McMaster, Queen’s and the University of Western Ontario, offer a very broad range of areas of specialization. Universities without medical schools, such as Brock, Carleton and Waterloo, offer more restricted and focused programs. For example, at the University of Waterloo, the Departments of Health Studies and Gerontology, Psychology and Kinesiology collaborate to offer a highly specialized PhD in Behavioral Neuroscience, and are planning to offer a specialized graduate diploma in computational neuroscience. York University falls into the latter category of institutions. 1.3 Rationale for a Diploma in Neuroscience at York York University has individual strengths in neuroscience that are unique within the 3
  4. 4. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page greater Toronto area and and in some cases at the international level. Many graduate students at York university are already engaged in neuroscience research, but our current graduate programs are not designed to provide the structure for a well-rounded education or scholarly community that is specific to the field foof neuroscience. Our current neuroscience faculty and graduate students are housed in a number of programsDepartments, with the highest concentrations in Psychology, Kinesiology and Health Science and Biology. The current proposal is a venture jointly developed by the graduate faculty of these programsDepartments but its structure is open to allow faculty from other programs Departments to participate in the future, either by adopting the diploma into their gGraduate pPrograms or by cross-appointment of faculty to one of the originating programs. Overall, York’s greatest strength is at the 'systems/cognitive' levels of neuroscience, with applications to neurology, rehabilitation, and neuropsychology. Other neuroscience programs place a greater emphasis on the molecular/cellular level but York’s strength will continue to lie in the former area where there is scope in Ontario for the development of a program of this nature. As this Ddiploma program may evolve eventually into an independent PhD program, its organizational structure will also allow us to identify areas where strength needs to be developed. In view of this, the time is ripe for York to harness its neuroscience strengths by developing, in the first instance, a Diploma program and, at some point in the future, a PhD program. Areas of particular strength of the proposed Diploma will be visual perception, visual- motor control and cognition and neuropsychology. In the case of visual perception and visual-motor control, many members of former case, 50% of the members of the York Centre for Vision Research, Canada's largest and strongest group in this area, are neuroscientists who will be involved with the proposed Diploma. In the case of visual perception, these faculty areFaculty in the area of visual perception are: Elder, Fallah, Hoffman, Murray, Steeves, Wilcox, Wilkinson and Wilson. In the case of visual-motor visual-motor control: Crawford, J.D., DeSouza, Harris, Henriques, Park and Sergio. In cCognition and neuropsychology is another area of strength and is represented by : Bialystock, Goel, Heinrichs, Murtha, Park, Rich, Rivest and , Rosenbaum. The new area of social cognitive neuroscience is growing in the Department of Psychology (Mar, McGregor). There is also representation in developmental neuroscience (Crawford, D.A.) and neuroendocrinology (Unnipappan). More dDetails about the faculty members associated with each of these areas are contained in Table 1 (p. 98). Their and their ccurriculum vitae s are contained in Part Volume 2. The preceding list of investigators use diverse technological approaches to neuroscience, including computation modeling, event-related potentials, brain imaging (fMRI, PET, MEG), animal neurophysiology, psychophysics, kinematics, trans-cranial magnetic stimulation, and molecular and cellular techniques. This occurs mainly at York and also through extensive local and international collaborations with hospitals 4
  5. 5. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page and other universities. In summary, at the present time York graduate students undertake sophisticated but individual neuroscience research with highly qualified supervisors. However, they do not have the opportunity to put this research into a broader context, to meet on a regular basis with like-minded colleagues or to fill gaps in their neuroscience education. The proposed Diploma is designed to overcome these deficiencies in their education. The us, the proposed Diploma can be viewed as the first step in the development of a much more comprehensive neuroscience program at York, eventually leading to a PhD in Neuroscience. 2. REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPLETION 2.1 Summary of Requirements 1) Concurrent Successful completion of a Masters thesis or PhD dissertation in the field of neuroscience, including a manuscript in the latter case. 2) Minimum 2-year consecutive participation in the Diploma program. 3) Successful completion of two half graduate courses in neuroscience. 4) Regular attendance at a monthly seminar series 5) Successful completion submission of a review paperfirst authored manuscript. Requirements 4 and 5 shall constitute the additional academic work, equivalent to two full graduate courses, necessary to meet Type 2 Diploma requirements. 2.2 Requirement 1: Concurrent Successful Completion of a Masters Thesis or PhD Dissertation. The thesis or dissertation will be on a topic in neuroscience and it will be under the supervision of a core member of the Diploma Program (see Table 1 for a list of core faculty). The Neuroscience Steering Committee (Section 4.1) shall make a determination that the thesis or dissertation topic falls within the neuroscience area at the time the student applies for admission to the Diploma. In order to ensure that PhD students have full access to the expertise of the program, at least one other member of their dissertation Supervisory Committee shall be a core member of the Diploma. To provide PhD students with the opportunity to develop the critical skill of preparing and submitting a manuscript for publication, the dissertation shall contain at least one first authored manuscript that has either been published in a recognized neuroscience journal, accepted for publication, or is ‘publishable in principle’. 5
  6. 6. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page Students may fulfill this requirement in two ways. First, the student may at any time submit a manuscript and editor’s letter, indicating either acceptance for publication or resubmission with revisions, to the Steering Committee to fulfill the requirement. Second, the student may wait until the dissertation is submitted for examination. The Steering Committee shall obtain an opinion from the External Examiner that at least one manuscript in the dissertation is ‘publishable in principle’. This request shall be sent to the External Examiner at the time the dissertation is forwarded for examination. If the External Examiner deems that the manuscript is ‘not publishable in principle’, then the student may petition the Steering Committee for a reassessment of this judgment, providing the student’s supervisor endorses the petition. Voting by each member of the Steering Committee, with the advice of non-members, if necessary, shall fall into one of three categories. Category 1: ‘Publishable in principle’, in which case the requirement is met. Category 2: ‘Returned for revisions’. This category indicates that the manuscript will be acceptable providing specified revisions are undertaken by the student. The Steering Committee shall provide a list of deficiencies to be remedied and the manuscript shall be resubmitted for a second vote, unless the Steering Committee determines that the student’s supervisor should take responsibility for ensuring that the revisions are made. Category 3: ‘Not publishable in principle’. This category indicates that the experiment is either badly flawed or so unoriginal that it would be highly unlikely to be accepted by a recognized journal. While Masters students are strongly encouraged to include a manuscript as part of their thesis, it is recognized that they may not have either the time or the opportunity to do this and they are exempted from this requirement. Nevertheless, it is expected that the thesis will be of publishable quality. 2.3 Requirement 2: Minimum 2-year consecutive participation in the Diploma program. This requirement has two purposes: to maintain consistency in the students’ curriculum and to allow resource planning for requirements 3 and 4. This requirement also sets the time window for fulfilling requirement number 4 (seminar attendance). While consecutive participation will normally be expected, students may petition artition the Steering Committee for relief from this requirement, if there are extenuating circumstances and the student’s supervisor supports the petition. Under these circumstances, the student would normally be expected to attend the required number of seminars over a non-consecutive time period. 6
  7. 7. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page 2.4 Requirement 3: Successful completion of two half graduate courses in neuroscience. The purpose of this requirement is to ensure that all students awarded the Diploma entering the program meet a minimum requirement of basic neuroscience knowledge. Given the multidisciplinary diversity of neuroscience, this is a key feature of the program. As described in Section 1.1, neuroscience covers a broad range of areas from the molecular to the cognitive level. Students taking the Diploma are unlikely to have a thorough grounding in basic principles across all levels. Consequently, they will be required to take two half courses, team taught by core faculty members, which will provide them with this grounding. Each course will at a minimum be offered in alternate years. The first course covers anatomical and cellular topics and is entitled ‘Fundamentals of Neuroscience I: Structures, Neurons and Synapses. The second course covers visual-motor and cognitive topics and is entitled ‘Fundamentals of Neuroscience II: Circuits, Systems and Behavior’. Appendix A contains the detailed outlines of these courses. They will be cross-listed between the Graduate Programmes in Biology, Kinesiology and Health Science and Psychology. It will therefore be possible for students to take these courses as part of the requirements for their Masters or PhD degree. Students not enrolled in the Diploma may take these course with permission of the instructor. 2.5 Requirement 4: Attendance at a monthly seminar series. This requirement is an important part of the Diploma because it will engender interaction with like-minded colleagues, introduces students to advanced research topics in a variety of areas and provide students with an opportunity to develop their presentation skills. Students will be required to attend a monthly seminar series over the 2 years of their Diploma, for a total of 16 seminars. The series will be organized by the Steering Committee and consist of research colloquia by invited speakers from both outside and inside the university. Readings covering each topic will be assigned to the students. As part of this series, a full day will be assigned to students presenting their research in conference presentation format. This seminar series will be independent of current York seminar series to ensure that it covers the necessary diversity of topics in neuroscience research. A subcommittee of the Steering Committee is organizing the first seminar series to precede the program (2007-2008), so that we can establish a baseline infrastructure can be developed for the following year. Attendance at seminars will be kept by the organizers but students may petition for relief from attendance at a particular seminar for good reason, such as attendance at a conference or a personal emergency. 7
  8. 8. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page 2.6 Requirement 5: Successful completion of a review paperfirst authored manuscript To provide an in-depth understanding of a topic in neuroscience, students shall prepare a critical review paper. The topic should be selected in consultation with the student’s supervisor. The review paper shall be approximately 6, 000 words in length, not including references. References shall be primarily to original sources and must be extensive enough to thoroughly cover the topic. The paper shall be submitted to the Steering Committee for assessment by two members, or their core faculty designates, prior to the thesis/dissertation defense. Assessment shall be on a pass/resubmit with revisions/fail basis. The review paper shall be over and above any curriculum requirements for the Masters or PhD degree, including the introduction to either the Masters thesis or the PhD dissertation. However, the paper may cover a sub-area of research mentioned in the introduction that is not reviewed in detail. The purpose of this requirement is to provide the student with the critical skill of preparing and submitting a manuscript for publication. Manuscripts shall be submitted to the Steering Committee for adjudication, In the case of a manuscript which has been submitted to a recognized neuroscience journal, acceptance by the Steering Committee shall be automatic, providing the manuscript is accompanied by an editor’s letter, indicating either acceptance for publication or resubmission with revisions. In the case of a manuscript that has not been submitted to a journal, or about which word from the journal has not been received, the Steering Committee shall judge the manuscript by majority vote, with the advice of non-members, if necessary. If the student’s supervisor is a member of the Steering Committee, they may not vote. Voting by each member of the Steering Committee shall fall into one of three categories. Category 1: ‘Publishable in principle’, in which case the requirement is met. Category 2: ‘Returned for revisions’. This category indicates that the manuscript will be acceptable providing specified revisions are undertaken by the student. The Steering Committee shall provide a list of deficiencies to be remedied and the manuscript shall be resubmitted for a second vote, unless the Steering Committee determines that the student’s supervisor should take responsibility for ensuring that the revisions are made. Category 3: ‘Not publishable in principle’. This category indicates that the experiment is either badly flawed or so unoriginal that it would be highly unlikely to be accepted by a recognized neuroscience journal. In this case the student may submit another manuscript on a different research topic for consideration by the Steering Committee. While Masters students are strongly encouraged to submit manuscripts, it is recognized that 8
  9. 9. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page they may not have either the time or the opportunity. In the case where it is not feasible for a Masters student to submit a research manuscript, the student may submit a review paper on a neuroscience topic in lieu of a manuscript. The reason why a manuscript is not feasible must be stated in writing to the Steering Committee, along with a short summary of the proposed topic of the review paper. The topic must be approved by the Steering Committee. The manuscript and review paper specified in this section can either be whole or part of the student’s Masters thesis or PhD dissertation research or a coursework requirement. 3. CORE FACULTY Table 1 below contains the list of core faculty, the area of neuroscience in which they work and their specific research interests. Core faculty are individuals who wish to offer the Diploma to at least some of their students. The curriculum vitas of the faculty in Table 1 are contained in Volume 2 of this proposal. Members of the Steering Committee are also indicated. These are individuals who have been guiding the development of the Diploma and who have volunteered to actively participate in its administration. The curriculum vitae of the faculty in Table 1 are contained in Part 2 of this proposal. The following list only includes faculty who volunteered after our initial recruiting within the Departments/Schools of Psychology, Biology, and Kinesiology & Health Sciences. It is expected that more faculty from these and other departments will become interested in joining the program once the proposed infrastructure is approved and in place. Faculty wishing to become core member shall submit a CV and statement of interest to the Steering Committee which shall determine the suitability of the applicant’s neuroscience credentials for inclusion as a core member. Table 1 List of core faculty Name and Rank Department Steering Committee Neuroscience Area Research Interests Bialystok, E. Distinguished Psychology no Cognition and neuropsychology Effect of experience on cognitive ability across the 9
  10. 10. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page Research Prof. lifespan Crawford, J.D. Professor and Canada Chair Psychology yes Visual-motor control Eye-hand coordination, 3-D gaze and trans-saccadic integration Crawford, D.A. Assistant Prof. Kinesiology yes Developmental Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying developmental disorders DeSouza, J. Assistant Prof. Psychology yes Visual-motor control Neural processing of the oculomotor and attentional systems Elder, J. Associate Prof. Psychology no Visual pPerception Neural mechanisms of contour perception Fallah, M. Assistant Prof. Kinesiology yes Visual pPerception Neural mechanisms of attention and object processing Goel, V. Associate Prof. Psychology no Cognition and neuropsychology The role of the prefrontal cortex in rational and emotional processing Harris, L. Professor Psychology no Visual-motor control Mechanisms of perceived orientation, sensory integration and self motion Heinrichs, W. Professor Psychology no Cognition and neuropsychology Neural mechanisms underlying schizophrenia Henriques, D. Assistant Prof. Kinesiology no Visual-motor control Neural mechanisms of multisensory eye, head and limb movements Hoffman, K. Assistant Prof. Psychology no Visual perception Neural dynamics of face and voice processing Mar, R. Assistant Prof. Psychology no Social cognition Neural basis of empathy and personality McGregor, I Associate Prof. Psychology no Social cognition Threat-induced frontal asymmetry and zealous extremism Murray, R. Assistant Prof. Psychology no Visual perception Computational modeling of visual perception Murtha, S. Professor Psychology no Cognition and neuropsychology Changes in attention and memory during normal and abnormal aging Park, N. Associate Professor. Psychology no Cognition and neuropsychology Memory for skilled action after cognitive impairment Rich, J. Associate Prof. Psychology no Cognition and neuropsychology Memory in normal and abnormal aging Rivest, J. Psychology no Cognition and Neural correlates of 10
  11. 11. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page Associate Prof. neuropsychology perceptual systems and disorders Rosenbaum, S. Assistant Prof. Psychology yes Cognition and neuropsychology Neural mechanisms of remote spatial and episodic memory Sergio, L. Associate Prof. Kinesiology yes Visual-motor control Neural mechanisms of visually guided reaching in health and disease Steeves, J. Assistant Prof. Psychology no Visual pPerception Neural mechanisms controlling face processing Unniappan, S. Assistant Prof. Biology no Neuroendocrinology The influence of neuroendocrine factors on neural mechanisms Wilcox, L. Associate Prof. Psychology no Visual pPerception The neural substrate of stereopsis Wilkinson, F. Professor Psychology yes Visual pPerception The role of the visual system in migraine Wilson, H. Professor Biology yes Visual pPerception Psychophysics of form vision and motion perception 4. ADMINISTRATION 4.1 Steering Committee The Steering Committee shall be composed of individuals who are actively involved in the administration of the Program. The Committee shall be composed of no fewer than four and no more than eight members, including at least two from Psychology and at least two from Kinesiology and Health Sciences. The Chair of the Committee shall be elected on an annual basis by its members. Membership shall be by invitation or self 11
  12. 12. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page nomination and shall be for a period of two years with the option of renewal for further terms. In the event that invitations or self nominations exceed the limit of eight members, core Diploma faculty shall vote to select members from the nominees. The Steering Committee shall be responsible for the quality of the Diploma Program and for its administration. The Chair shall convene meetings of all part of the Committee as necessary to conduct the affairs of the Program, including organizing the seminar series (Section 2.5), reviewing and approving manuscripts (Section 2.6), admitting students (Section 4.2), maintaining records (Section 4.3), reviewing student progress, determining the suitability of the neuroscience credentials of faculty applying for core membership and undertaking any other relevant business. 4.2 Admissions Process Students wishing to be admitted to the Program must be enrolled as a Masters or PhD student in one of the following the Graduate Programs: of either Biology, Kinesiology and Health Science or Psychology. Normally students will participate in the home department program of the supervisor. A web-site at www.yorku.ca/neuro neurosci will be set up to advertise the diploma program and direct students to the correct supervisors and graduate programs. The student shall submit to the Steering Committee a one paragraph summary of their proposed research and a letter of endorsement from their supervisor supporting the application. The supervisor must be a core member of the Diploma Program. The Committee will make its decision to admit or reject the application on the basis of these two sources of information. It is anticipated that enrollment will be limited to 15 students/year, the limiting factor being the manageable size of the two neuroscience courses. 4.3 Record of Admission and Completion of Requirements Appendix B contains the form ‘Diploma in Neuroscience - Record of Admission and Completion’ which will be used to track the progress of each student enrolled in the Program. Upon admission into the Program by the Steering Committee, the Chair or designate shall complete Part A and forward the form to the home program of the student for inclusion in his/her file. It shall be the joint responsibility of the student and supervisor to obtain the relevant signatures indicating progress through the Diploma requirements in Part B of the form. Upon completion of all requirements the form shall be submitted to the Steering Committee for final approval of award of the Diploma and completion of Part C. All Diploma requirements must be completed at the same time as the degree requirements. The Diploma can only be completed once, either at the Masters level or the PhD level. Students promoted to the PhD level from the Masters level who have not completed all Diploma requirements will be required to meet the PhD requirements of the Diploma. 4.4 Resources 12
  13. 13. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page Additional resources are not required from York University to mount this Diploma. The two neuroscience courses will be taught in alternate years as part of the normal assigned graduate workload of the Course Directorson a voluntary basis by core faculty. This workload amount to a quarter course or less per faculty member every second year. Further, the option is available for these faculty members to include this teaching as part of their formal graduate level workload, if they so wish. The seminar series is also being conducted on a voluntary basis by members of the Steering Committee. The seminar series will not require funding from the Faculty of Graduate Studies, since the resources of the Center for Vision Research are available to cover the costs of guest speakers and refreshments. Minimal workload will be imposed on the three Graduate Program Assistants, since they will are only be required to store the ‘Record of Admission and Completion’ in the file of each student taking the Diploma. It will be the joint responsibility of the supervisor and student to have all sections of Part B completed and deliver the form to the Steering Committee for completion of Part C. Appendix A New Course Proposal Dr. Dorota Anna Crawford, Ph.D., dakc@yorku.ca Dr. Mazyar Fallah, Ph.D., mfallah@yorku.ca Dr. Lauren Sergio, Ph.D., lsergio@yorku.ca 13
  14. 14. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page 1. Course Number and Title KAHS: 6XXX 3.0 Title: Fundamentals of Neuroscience I: Structures, Neurons, and Synapses 2. Effective Date and Term TBA. 3. Calendar Course Description This course will focus on molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the structure and function of the nervous system, functional neuroanatomy, and the neurophysiology of movement. Prerequisites: undergraduate course in neuroscience or equivalent or by permission of course director. 4. Expanded Course Description The course will provide graduate students with an in depth analysis of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the structure and function of the developing and mature nervous system. This is an advanced course that will focus on current research topics in selected areas of Neuroscience, which is the study of the biology of the nervous system and its relationship to behavior and disease. The course includes three modules, (1) molecular and cellular neuroscience, (2) functional neuroanatomy and (3) muscle and spinal cord neurophysiology, which will introduce students to the breadth of research in Neuroscience. The molecular and cellular neuroscience module course covers topics ranging from neuronal structure and function, communication at the synapse, membrane receptors and intra- and intercellular signaling systems within the sensory, motor, memory, and speech systems. It will also cover the cellular and molecular processes underlying neuronal development, including differentiation of nerve cells, migration of neurons, mechanisms of axonal growth and guidance, target recognition and synapse formation, and the basis of synaptic specificity. The functional neuroanatomy module will cover the structures and functions of the brain, including the meninges, cranial nerves, spinal cord, brainstem, subcortical structures, ventricular system, and cortex. Muscle and spinal cord neurophysiology will cover neuromuscular and motor unit function in health and disease, spinal cord function, and reflex modulation during movement. Module 1 – Functional neuroanatomy – Director: Dr. Mazyar Fallah 1. Anatomical Organization of the CNS 2. Functional Organization of Perception and Movement 3. Association Areas of the Cerebral Cortex 4. Internal Cellular Representation Required for Perception and Action Module 2 – Molecular and cellular neuroscience – Director: Dr. Dorota A. Crawford 14
  15. 15. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page 5. Cell biology of neurons and protein trafficking 6. Molecular biology of ion channels 7. Membrane potential and action potential 8. Synaptic Transmission, second messenger system and neurotransmitters 9. Development: proliferation and migration, pathfinding and target selection, formation of synapses Module 3 – Muscle and spinal cord neurophysiology – Director: Dr. Lauren Sergio 10. The motor unit and muscle action 11. Diseases of the motor unit 12. Spinal reflexes 5. Faculty Resources The course will be taught by Drs. Dorota A. Crawford, Mazyar Fallah and Lauren Sergio who have the expertise to teach this course. Drs. Denise Henriques and Hugh Wilson can also teach the course. 6. Evaluation Students will be evaluated based on three exams, class participations and term paper on a topic of the student’s choice, related to topics covered in class. Final mark will be based on: • Class Exam 1 (Module 1) 25% • Class Exam 1 (Module 2) 30% • Final Exam (Module 3) 20% • Class discussions and attendance 5% • Course essay (a review of an area covered in the course) 20% 7. Bibliography There is a textbook required for the course: Eric R. Kandel, James Schwartz, and Thomas Jessell. “Principles of Neural Science”4th Edition (Elsevier) Further reading will be assigned by individual instructors. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) Assigned readings will be available from the York University library system from journals, such as Nature, Science, Journal of Neuroscience, Nature Genetics, Nature Neuroscience, Brain, Brain Research, Journal of Neurobiology, Neuron, Cell, NeuroReport and Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. 9. Integrated Courses N/A 15
  16. 16. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page 10. Cross-listed Courses BIOL 6XXX 3.0 and PSYCH 6XXX 3.0 11. Rationale As indicated in the course outline, the purpose of the course is to examine 3 aspects of the brain: the fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying the general features of cellular neuroscience, functional neuroanatomy, and neurophysiology of movement. Students in Kinesiology and Health Science, Biology and Psychology will gain a deeper understanding of these topics in Neuroscience. This will be important for any student who is interested in pursuing a career in neuroscience research or a career in the health-care professions. This course is also important for students who wish to pursue studies in systems neuroscience or cognitive neuroscience, as well as those with a general interest in cellular and molecular biology. This course will provide an important and crucial background for students enrolled in the Neuroscience Diploma of the graduate program within the three departments. New Course Proposal Dr. Joseph DeSouza, Ph.D., desouza@yorku.ca Dr. Kari Hoffman, Ph.D., khoffman@yorku.ca 5. Course Number and Title PSYC: 6XXX 3.0 Title: Fundamentals of Neuroscience II: Circuits, Systems, and Behavior 6. Effective Date and Term TBA. 16
  17. 17. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page 7. Calendar Course Description This course will focus on a systems approach to specialized circuits within the central nervous system that determine sensory, motor and cognitive systems. This course requires as a prerequisite PSYC 6XXX 3.0, BIO 6XXX 3.0 or KAHS 6XXX 3.0 [i.e. Fundamentals of Neuroscience I: structures, neurons and synapses.], or permission from the Course Directors.Permission of the Course Directors is required to enroll in the course. 8. Expanded Course Description The course will provide graduate students with an in depth analysis of the circuits within the nervous system that underlying the structure and function of the developing and mature nervous system. This is an advanced course that will focus on current research topics in selected areas of Neuroscience, which is the study of the biology of the nervous system and its relationship to behavior and disease. The course includes two modules that cover a range of topics within systems neuroscience. It is designed to compliment Elements of Neuroscience I and in total will introduce students to the breadth of research within the field of Neuroscience. Module 1 –– Director: Drs. DeSouza and Hoffman 13. Neurotechniques 14. Principles of neural computation Module 2 –– Director: Dr. DeSouza 15. Visual, auditory & somatosensory systems 16. Vestibular system, eye movements and other senses 17. Basal Ganglia, Cerebellum and subcortical systems 18. Higher cortical systems Module 3 –– Director: Dr. Kari Hoffman 19. Plasticity and Learning 20. Sleep and Spontaneous activity 21. Emotion/Motivation 22. Autonomic system/ hormones and stress 5. Faculty Resources The course will be taught by Drs. Joseph DeSouza and Kari Hoffman who have the expertise to teach this course. Drs. J. Douglas Crawford, Susan Murtha, Shayna Rosenbaum, Lauren Sergio, Jennifer Steeves and Frances Wilkinson could also teach parts of this course and appear as guest lecturers. 6. Evaluation Students will be evaluated based on two exams, class participations and term paper on a topic of the student’s choice (to be approved by the course instructor). Term paper will related to a specific topic covered in class. Final mark will be based on: 17
  18. 18. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page • Class Exam (Module 1) 25% • Class Exam (Module 2) 25% • Paper presentations 20% • Class discussions and attendance 5% • Course essay (a review of an area covered in the course) 25% 7. Bibliography Eric R. Kandel, James Schwartz, and Thomas Jessell. “Principles of Neural Science”4th Edition (Elsevier) Selected readings from peer-reviewed journal articles will be assigned for each class. 8. Resources (library/physical/other) Assigned readings will be available from the York University library system from journals, such as Nature, Science, Journal of Neuroscience, Nature Genetics, Nature Neuroscience, Brain, Brain Research, Journal of Neurobiology, Neuron, Cell, NeuroReport and Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. 9. Integrated Courses N/A 10. Cross-listed Courses BIOL 6XXX 3.0 and KAHS 6XXX 3.0 11. Rationale As indicated in the course outline, the purpose of the course is to examine three aspects of the brain: the fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying the general features of systems neuroscience and its’ implications when these systems fail due to systems specific disease states. Students in Psychology, Biology and Kinesiology and Health Science will gain a deeper understanding of these topics in Neuroscience. This will be important for any student who is interested in pursuing a career in neuroscience research or a career in the health-care professions. This course is also important for students who wish to pursue studies in systems neuroscience or cognitive neuroscience, as well as those with a general interest in the biological basis of behavior. This course will provide an important and crucial background for students enrolled in the Neuroscience Diploma of the graduate program within the three departments. 18
  19. 19. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page APPENDIX B Diploma in Neuroscience Record of Admission and Completion PART A Name of Student __________________ ____________ Name of Supervisor _______________________________ Degree Sought:  MA/MSc  PhD Currently Enrolled In:  Biology  Kinesiology & Health Science  Psychology I certify that this student has been accepted into the Neuroscience Diploma Program: Chair of Steering Committee _________________________________ Date ___________________ 19
  20. 20. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page PART B Certification that this student has completed the following Diploma requirements:  Suitable Masters or PhD Research Topic Name (please print) _______________________________ Position ________________________ Signature ____________________________________________  Masters Thesis or  PhD Dissertation with manuscript Name (please print) _______________________________ Position ________________________ Signature ____________________________________________  Two-year consecutive participation in the Program and Seminar Series Name (please print) _______________________________ Position ________________________ Signature ____________________________________________ Two courses in Neuroscience  NEUROSCIENCE I Name (please print) ______________________________ Position _______________________ Signature ____________________________________________  NEUROSCIENCE II Name (please print) ______________________________ Position ________________________ Signature ____________________________________________  First authored manuscriptReview paper Name (please print) ________________________________ Position ________________________ Signature ____________________________________________ PART C I certify that the above student has completed all the requirements for the Diploma in Neuroscience: ___________ _______________________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Chair of Steering Committee Date MayJune 2007 20
  21. 21. Neuroscience Diploma Proposal page 21

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