Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
MS Trust Business Plan Toolkit - Scotland.doc
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

MS Trust Business Plan Toolkit - Scotland.doc

161
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
161
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. MS Trust Business Plan Toolkit Scotland version Alice Hamilton Vicki Matthews June 2007
  • 2. Business plan toolkit Contents Introduction – how to use this toolkit Explanatory notes Business Plan Appendix 1 – Referral criteria, key relationships, and current strengths and weaknesses of the service Appendix 2 – health promotion and self-management, family and carer support Appendix 3 – clinical advances in care Appendix 4 – National Service Framework for long-term conditions metrics 2
  • 3. How to use this toolkit In the current financial climate, all MS specialist nurses will need to be able to justify how they provide cost-effective services which give significant clinical benefit. Most NHS Boards and their operating divisions are run by accountants. Therefore, being able to make a case for why the MS specialist nursing service can save the employer money is vital to ensure that care for people with MS continues to be as good as it can be. However, nurses want to care for people – not become bean counters! So the MS Trust has devised this toolkit to help make the whole business planning experience as painless as possible. What’s inside This toolkit contains: • business plan • appendices No service has to complete everything – some elements are more relevant to some services than others. And we would stress that the first time is the worst. Once you’ve written one business plan, it only has to be updated every year. The Business Plan, the main element of the toolkit, is essential for every service. We’ve made this as straightforward as possible by completing all the core elements of the Business Plan for you. This includes supporting evidence in terms of government policy and research where needed. Completing it and tailoring it for your service will require some number crunching and getting some of the information together may be painful. But done once, it does get easier. Some of the information can also be used for other purposes, eg clinical audit. The Appendices are there to help you evaluate what you are doing, what works, what doesn’t, and how the service can develop. These will be essential if the service is under threat or if you would like to develop certain elements or expand practice, or are resisting some service change that will simply be too much. What happens to the Business Plan? The Business Plan should be completed to tie in with the financial year – April-March – as this is how all NHS organisations have to run their finances. Normally financial planning is done the autumn before the new financial year, so check with your manager when they start planning. 3
  • 4. Business Plans are only worth writing if enough people see them. Therefore, we suggest each MS nursing service sends a copy of their Business Plan, together with a letter or compliments slip and business card with up-to-date contact information to: • Chief Executive of the Operating Division (eg hospital or primary care) • Lead Nurse/Director of Nursing of the Operating Division • Consider submitting to Nursing Professional Committee for the Health Board • Line manager • Consultant neurologist(s)/managed clinical network/ other local neurological network (if any) • Local MS Society Development Worker, if any • MS Trust • MS Society Nurse Fund officer, if applicable Getting the information together Getting the information together can be very daunting if you are not in the habit. The following are some suggested tips – these are not comprehensive – to help estimate numbers: • Monthly activity – record what you are doing every day for a month and how long you do it for, eg clinics – how many hours; telephone support work; relapse management; assessment; CPD/clinical supervision/meetings; home visits etc. Sometimes this will come up with unwelcome answers but at least you are then prepared, and may be able to consider service redesign. • Count your caseload, and if possible categorise, so numbers of relapsing/remitting, primary progressive, secondary progressive etc. • Telephone service – record all calls for a week, how many, how long they are, roughly what they concern (eg symptoms, emotional support, referral questions etc). Then decide whether this has been ‘normal’ or ‘busy’ or ‘quiet’. Count up the total number of calls, estimate average length and multiply this by 48 (52 weeks less 4 weeks holiday) to give an annual figure. Estimate how many hours this is. For example: 50 calls in one week average 10 minutes; total hours over a week is: 50 x 10 = 500 minutes, divided by 60 gives 8.3hours. 8.3 hours x 48 weeks = 398.4 hours. 398.4hours divided by 37.5 hours (average working week) = 10.62 weeks spent on telephone support. 4
  • 5. It is important to make explicit the value of the telephone service, eg symptom and relapse assessment, triage, counselling etc. • Guesstimate – don’t know exactly how many newly diagnosed patients you’ve seen? Take a guess. You might know it’s around 5 a month. Then estimate up at around 60 a year. BUT use an approximate figure that isn’t round to avoid suspicion. • Risk-assess unpopular activity. Eg for hospitals, the classic example is domiciliary visits, which are never seen as a cost-effective use of your time. It is worth getting into the habit of conducting a risk-assessment for every planned domiciliary visit. You may be able to identify potential cost savings/cost avoidance to the Trust by carrying out this visit, managing to prevent complicated or costly admission to the hospital with the potential to block a bed. Risk assessment works two ways: you can also do this if your employer plans to change working practices that will be detrimental to your service eg working on the wards. Are you up-to-date? Will you be able to take the place of qualified ward staff? What impact will this have on the MS service? If you are having real difficulty getting some information together because of local systems etc, it may be worth admitting that some figures are estimated. Only do this is you are very secure in your post. However, it can highlight local system failures. 5
  • 6. Explanatory Notes These notes should be read in conjunction with the main business plan on pages 15-19 The main document should not exceed 6 pages of A4 in total. Cover sheet – full name of MS service, full name of employing organisation eg hospital, Health Board , year the business plan covers, date of publication, Health Board/hospital logo Eg: Multiple Sclerosis Specialist Nursing Service Peasbody Infirmary Inveraray Health Board. Review of financial year 2006/7 and business plan for 2007/8 Date of publication: November 2006 The business plan proper will start on the next page. Scheme Title : formal name of your MS service Sponsoring group/contact details etc: complete if this is a sponsored post, eg MS Society, together with contact details for your sponsoring group eg local Development Worker, Branch secretary. If an NHS post, delete this box. Current cost of service: Complete this box last. It is the headline figure but the rest of the business plan supports it. For hospital posts: the Business Manager(if any) for your hospital/operating division may have an overall cost of the service. If not, make an estimate, based on salary(ies) plus mileage (if applicable) plus mobile phone and bills, plus anything else you claim/are charged for. Primary care posts: estimate based on salary(ies) plus mileage (if applicable) plus mobile phone and bills, plus anything else you claim/are charged for; check with your line manager Estimated overall saving to Health Board: insert name of employer here Hospital posts: be creative and consider the amount of work you are saving consultant neurologists etc. It is unlikely that there will be any precise figures about how much income a specialist nurse generates as Scotland doesn’t yet have a mechanism for collecting this information. Primary care posts: The trick here is to estimate reductions in demand on acute services eg unplanned admissions, referrals to acute neurology services. It’s all guesswork but for example, can you identify relapses managed locally which otherwise would have had to be referred to acute 6
  • 7. services, and costs relating to those; also reduction in follow-up appointments and so forth? If the figures don’t work in your favour, omit this box Title of development and key service details Description of MS: leave as is. This description is to ensure that all managers are aware of MS – most aren’t. It is important that managers are aware of the young age at diagnosis, the unpredictability of the condition and the need for service flexibility to manage these patients. Local prevalence and incidence: Hospital: the population your hospital serves is normally known and should be available from central sources. Calculate an estimated figure using the sums given. Primary care staff: populations for a health board area are known and should be available from Head Office; calculate an estimated figure using the sums given. New cases: record all newly diagnosed cases and also new cases known to the service every year. If there is a significant mismatch, it’s worth asking why? Are you getting lots of new referrals because people with existing diagnoses are moving to the area? Or is it that GPs are only just becoming aware of you and the number of new cases should tail off in time. Mortality: record number of deaths here, if known. It is important to show that mortality rates are less than new case rates, so demand for the service is likely to rise. Caseload and case mix: record your case load. If this is significantly less than the RCN/UKMSSNA/MST recommended numbers (300 pwMS of whom 100 are on DMTs), delete that paragraph. However, if you are part-time, record the proportional figures – eg: “current case load is 150 patients, of whom 50 are on DMTs. This is in line with recommended guidelines given that the post is 50% of a full-time equivalent.” If the caseload is significantly higher than recommendations, point out how much higher – eg “caseload is currently 600 patients per MSSN, this is twice recommended level according to guidelines.” It is worth defining case mix if at all possible, as shown in the business plan: -DMTs -high dependency with complex disability -medium dependency requiring specialist intervention -self-managing with some specialist advice 7
  • 8. If possible, relate this to an age profile eg 25% patients aged 20-35; 40% aged 35-60; 35% aged 60 and above. Not essential, but useful in the current policy climate. Key service activities: a brief list of everything you do with an estimate of time taken on average. Do not give detail which can go in appendices, where you can justify unpopular activities if necessary. Suggestions are listed in the business plan but different services do different things. Current team, and exit strategy if continuation not agreed List members of current team and proper titles eg MS Nurse Consultant and 2 MS specialist nurses Or MS specialist nurse Or Clinical Nurse Specialist MS Exit strategy: spell out what happens if the service does not exist/ is reduced For example: Hospitals: greater demand for medical neuro services, with implications for waiting times; poor relapse management leading to increase in unplanned admissions; greater risk of MS complications leading to risk of increase in unplanned admissions etc. Primary care: greater demand for GP appointments, more referrals into acute neuro services, poor relapse management leading to increase in unplanned admissions, greater risk of MS complications leading to risk of increase in unplanned admissions, limited home-based risk assessment leading to rise in demand for home-care services and increased risk of pressure sores etc. Resources required £start up/part year – nil £ non recurrent –nil unless you are making a case for a new part of the service or for cover eg maternity leave. If that is the case, you need to spell out what the costs are, how long they are expected to last, and whether they are unavoidable. These are things to discuss with your line manager before the business plan is completed. £ recurrent – salary(ies), mileage, mobile phone and bills, anything else you might be charged for eg clinic use in outreach settings Capital – equipment: eg computer, fixed telephone line, phone, desk, chair, office, anything else that is fixed that you use often; spell out that these are non-recurrent costs. Capital – buildings etc – none Staffing implications – number of staff and AfC bands here (eg 1 AfC 6, 1 AfC 7); include any admin support here, with hours and banding IM& T implications - (this stands for Information Management & Technology) – none 8
  • 9. Benefit of scheme Wording here applies to Scotland – amend if necessary. Additional material could include any local neuroscience framework that supports your work, eg information from a Managed Clinical Network or one of the Neurology Patient Pathways. How would outcomes be measured? Ideally you want agreed outcomes that fit in with the Trust’s priority areas, so for example: For hospitals: • facilitating 18 week target from referral to outpatients appointment by freeing up consultant neurologist time • involvement in discharge planning ensuring prompt discharge and no bed blocking • local service level agreements eg newly diagnosed patients, new referrals, relapse clinics – measure achievements against targets and display these • national protocols, eg for relapse management , and outcomes you measure these against • local protocols if any eg for spasticity management For primary care these include: • health promotion in hard-to-reach groups (give numbers) • reduction in referral to acute neurology services – comparison of before and after you came into post can be helpful • reduction in unplanned hospital admissions • local service level agreements eg newly diagnosed patients, new referrals, relapse clinics – measure achievements against targets and display these • national protocols eg for relapse management, and outcomes you measure these against • local protocols if any eg for spasticity management Delete any that are not appropriate to your service; add any that are specific to your service. Outcomes can also be measured against the National Service Framework for Long-term Condition Metrics, which are listed in Appendix 4. The NSF does not apply to Scotland and is not given any weight in policy, which can be difficult as it does provide a useful framework that ties in quite well with the policy reforms that have followed the Kerr Report. Evidence base This is the current evidence. 9
  • 10. If you have good evidence from local audit, which includes estimated cost- effectiveness, use that instead. You might include a line or so about Johnson’s research reiterating the cost-effectiveness of MS specialist nursing. What clinical and patient involvement has there been/will there be? List all the links with service user groups that interact with the MS service eg local MS Society and other MS groups; local MS Therapy Centre if any; clinical links with acute neurology services/rehab services/other services; any other networks eg managed clinical networks or other neuroscience networks; local initiative teams. Has there been any audit of the caseload for patient views, eg patient satisfaction surveys? Are any planned? What are the quantifiable benefits in terms of: activity change, financial savings, cost avoidance? Activity change: Hospital posts: • reduced demand for consultant neurology or other doctor’s services, in clinic and any advanced practitioner role you may have taken on • timely and appropriate referrals to other services leading to prevention of emergencies (and bed blocking) • discharge management preventing bed blocking • education and outreach of other staff eg ward staff leading to better management of patients with complex disabilities, reducing need for emergency admissions and inappropriate referrals • Implementation of national and local protocols and guidance Primary care posts: • reduced GP referrals to acute neurology services • reduced unplanned hospital admissions • prevention of emergencies • education and outreach in primary care leading to better management of patients with complex disabilities, reducing need for emergency admissions and inappropriate referrals • implementation of national and local protocols and guidance Income generation and financial savings Hospital posts: The following are examples only: • savings in consultant neurologist time by MS specialist nurse – number of hours; allows them to see other people • other savings in neurologist time (eg relapse management, assessment) – number of hours 10
  • 11. • reduction in transport costs by seeing patients in local clinics – can you quantify? • improved adherence to drugs, lessening wastage of drugs and the drugs budget through non-compliance • improved self-management leading to fewer requests for consultant neurologist intervention Primary care posts: Examples might be: • cost savings compared with cost of attending acute neurology services (check these figures with the Operating Division business or finance manager – may not be obtainable) • cost savings in avoided emergency hospital admissions, if known • imely and appropriate referral to other primary care services, eg continence, rehab etc • improved adherence to drugs and other products (eg equipment) lessening wastage of the budget through non compliance Cost avoidance For all posts • timely and appropriate referral to other services in health and social care, ensuring reduced emergencies and duplication of services (give some examples in Appendix 2: Health promotion, self-management, and supporting families and carers) What other knock on effects are there? A display case for achievements – be brief and include detail in Appendix 2. Examples might include: • new course for newly diagnosed – state name, number of times it ran, outcomes (eg reduced need for emotional support) • care staff training courses – name, type of course, number of staff reached, outcomes eg improved awareness of MS, reduced emergencies etc • compliments from other health professionals about the impact you have on their workload, eg reducing inappropriate referrals to rehab, or timeliness of referrals to continence services etc. • leading multi-disciplinary team working • Involvement in neurology networks, leading to service improvements Has this version been discussed with: Unless this is a new bid, or the service is really under threat, leave these boxes blank. Finance IM&T Other eg estates Chief Executive sign off: worth leaving in here just to provoke a reaction! 11
  • 12. 12
  • 13. Appendix 1 Referral criteria, key relationships and current strengths and weaknesses of the service This should be self-explanatory. Delete and add examples as applicable. This appendix is about identifying where the service is at the moment and how it might develop in the future. Appendix 2 This is a display case which can also be used to bury essential services which might be seen as not cost-effective by NHS senior managers. • Health Promotion Outline what activities you have undertaken, when, how and what they have achieved (briefly!) to encourage health promotion and education for people with MS and other health professionals. This would include, for example: • Newly dx courses • Fatigue management courses • GP / care staff outreach • Ward staff outreach • Ward staff liaison • Case management - Social services liaison • District nursing liaison • Patient information sessions • Referrals to expert patient programme • Carer and family support • Other interventions eg liaison with other services for vocational rehab etc Include: full name of course, where and how it ran, how many times, number of delegates, measured outcomes eg evaluations. For case management and patient information sessions, give brief details of liaison, solution found, reduction in your workload (if appropriate). • Telephone Service Give as much detail as possible about: • Who calls • How many calls • How long calls take • Nature of calls (broken down into categories eg symptoms, emotional support etc) 13
  • 14. Do a risk analysis of what would happen if this service wasn’t there. Where would these calls go – to GPs, and refer into acute neuro services? To medical secretaries? How many of them might become medical problems if on-the-spot advice wasn’t available? • Risk/benefit analysis for home visits It is worth getting into the habit of doing a risk/benefit analysis for every planned home visit (obviously if you are out and about and ‘pop in’, that’s a different matter), to justify why it’s happening. Risks of home visit: eg time, cost, travel etc Benefits of home visit: Outcome achieved: eg health promotion, appropriate referral, avoiding emergency admission etc Likelihood of repeat home visit: Yes/No and why Potential outcome if home visit had not been undertaken: Appendix 3: clinical advances in MS care in xxx This appendix sells the team’s clinical skills and financial prowess in taking on advanced work / developing care pathways to streamline services for people with MS. Obviously this may not always apply to every MS specialist service each year. But worth listing here are: • Any care pathways / protocols, local or national, that have been adopted, and any involvement in their development • Any advanced level skills, eg lumbar punctures, specialist drug clinics, specialist assessment clinics, that relieve the workload of doctors • Any specialised clinic eg relapse clinic • Any new teams/clinics eg multi-disciplinary assessments • Any really new service developments, eg links with vocational rehab, how these work well and why they are desirable Examples need to be evaluated for financial outcomes as well as clinical ones. For example, multi-disciplinary assessments improve patient experience, are less likely to duplicate services and referrals, better prescription of and better adherence to equipment etc. 14
  • 15. Or Relapse clinics ensure prompt assessment and treatment, best access to steroids, ensuring faster recovery and perhaps less symptomatic management, less likelihood of admission for worsening symptoms, are cheaper than access to neurologist service etc 15
  • 16. Multiple Sclerosis Trust Business Plan for MS Specialist Nurses working in Scotland 16
  • 17. Scheme Title Sponsoring group / Contact details etc Current cost of service Estimated overall saving to NNN ££££ £££ - Title of Development, and key service details Description of MS Local prevalence and annual incidence Caseload and case mix Multiple sclerosis is the leading cause of disability in young adults. People are typically diagnosed at a median age of 30 years. Over time, MS normally becomes progressive, debilitating and causes complex disability. It is not life threatening and consequently management of MS is a long-term team effort. There are no short- term solutions. MS is a variable condition. However, the majority of patients will develop a range of fluctuating symptoms, both physical and cognitive, which take time to assess and manage. Additionally, significant levels of coexisting conditions such as depression are found in any MS patient population. Consequently, cost-effective management of MS is time-consuming for health professionals. Anticipated prevalence of multiple sclerosis in the Scottish population is 180-200 cases per 100,000. In the local population the expected caseload is nnn whereas the actual caseload is xxx Incidence of new cases referred to the service is currently xxx per year; of these xx are newly diagnosed. It is anticipated that incidence of new cases will continue to rise - (delete as applicable) - as GPs and other services become aware of the MS specialist nurse – so incidence may level off over time - as people with existing diagnoses move to this area - as specialist neurologist at hospital receives more patients referred from other generalist neurologists Mortality is nn per year on average, so at present the caseload is growing by v% year on year. The RCN and UK Multiple Sclerosis Specialist Nurse Association have identified an ideal maximum caseload for an MS specialist nurse of 300 patients, of whom around 100 patients receive disease modifying drug therapy.1 Actual current caseload is yyy or nnn patients per MS specialist nurse. Of these: - zzz are receiving disease modifying drug therapy - MS specialist nurse support for these patients is a requirement nnn are high dependency with complex disability - nnn are medium dependency, requiring specialist 17
  • 18. Key service activities intervention - nnn are most self-managing with some specialist advice Key service activities – for more detail, see Appendices (if applicable) Delete/amend following as applicable: • specialist clinical advice • co-ordinator-led clinic – xx hours per month (if appropriate) • health promotion/prevention activities – zz hours per month –see Appendix 2 • education and outreach to GPs, community nurses and therapists, and care home staff– yy hours per month – see Appendix 2 • telephone support service – yy hours per month (estimate number of calls per day and time per average call, then multiply up) - see Appendix 2 • home visits – zz hours per month – see Appendix 2 • care pathways- are there any? Are you involved in developing any? See Appendix 3 • Advanced practitioner/specialist services Eg relapse management services, symptom specific services. Basic outline here, details of service in Appendix 3 Current position and exit strategy if not agreed Multiple sclerosis specialist nurse Exit strategy – see explanatory notes Resources required - £ Start up / Part year Calculate as applicable - £ Non recurrent See explanatory notes - £ Recurrent See explanatory notes Capital - equipment See explanatory notes Capital – buildings etc None Staffing implications See explanatory notes IM&T implications None Benefit of scheme: Which plans and targets are met and how? The current thrust of government policy, for example in Delivering for Health (2005), is a move away from a reactive service dealing with acute emergencies towards a patient-centred service where people are empowered to manage their condition individually and NHS services are aimed at preventive medicine as far as possible. Delivering for Health focused on the need to provide care for people with long-term conditions that is integrated, responsive, specialist where necessary, supports self-care and manages vulnerable cases by anticipating needs. MS specialist nurses are uniquely well placed to fulfil all these requirements. The three-tier level of neurological care outlined in Delivering for Health recognises the importance of access to nurse-led clinics at all levels of care. The SNAP report on MS (2000) outlined that the ideal MS service should: 1. allow rapid referral of suspected cases 18
  • 19. 2. provide assessment of possible diagnosis by a neurologist 3. provide assessment from a multi-disciplinary team experienced in MS management to identify individual needs and to deliver the appropriate service 4. provide ongoing and continuous follow up at defined intervals and also to allow a rapid referral system at times of crisis 5. provide information and support to patients and carers The SNAP report highlighted the need for more MS specialist nurses in Scotland. The SNAP report supported formation of Managed Clinical Networks as a means of providing care for people with MS that responds to local needs and priorities. [If part of a MCN, insert any agreed actions/policies here, or direct to an appendix] Any local neuroscience framework? How would outcomes be measured? What is the evidence base for this? See explanatory notes Research into an individual MS specialist nurse’s practice demonstrated sizeable financial savings to the employing hospital. In the hospital concerned, Johnson found: • A total saving to the Trust of £64,000 which remained even after employment costs of the MS Specialist nurse. This was based on a comparison of the total costs in the year prior to the MS specialist nurse coming into post, with her first year in the job. • A reduction in the rate of emergency rather than elective hospital admissions, and a statistically significant reduction in length of hospital stay of approximately 50% of time. • Elective hospital admissions were more appropriately directed to specialist neurology and rehabilitation wards. In the research period, costs for emergency admissions were approximately £255.61 per day versus £179.77 per day for elective admissions in the financial year 1999-2000. A simple calculation of reduced cost, as indicated by a comparison of bed occupancy between the two years amounted to £104,000. Johnson J, Smith P, Goldstone L. Evaluation of MS specialist nurses: a review and development of the role. London: South Bank University & Letchworth:MS Research Trust; 2001 June. What clinical and patient involvement has there been,/ will there be? See explanatory notes What are the quantifiable benefits in terms of: • activity change • financial savings • cost avoidance? See explanatory notes 19
  • 20. What other ‘knock on’ effects are there? See explanatory notes Has this version been discussed with: Finance Yes/No Commissioning Yes/No IM&T Yes/No Other e.g. estates Chief Executive Sign Off 20
  • 21. Appendix 1 Referral criteria, key relationships and current strengths and weaknesses of the service • Referral criteria Referrals – from / to Location of referrals How received Referral boundaries eg only from neurologist, geographical boundaries, financial boundaries etc • Key relationships Referrals will probably define your key relationships. This should also show up gaps that will inform your SWOT analysis. Examples might include: • neurologists • continence services • neuro-therapy services • Rehabilitation • psychology and psychiatric services • GP services • Social services • 3rd sector eg MS therapy centres, complementary therapies • palliative care • dietitians / nutritional support • wheelchair services But don’t forget: • Line management • Clinical supervision • Team support • Commissioners/ing • Service users • MS organisations 21
  • 22. • Strengths and weaknesses of the service Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats Include here any plans for service development that address weaknesses and threats. Include here every gap in local service provision for people with MS, eg rehabilitation, wheelchair services, respite, employment advice, counselling, family support etc, and why this impacts on your service. 22
  • 23. Appendix 2 Health promotion and self-management, family and carer support • Health promotion and self-management • Telephone service • Risk/benefit analysis for home visits 23
  • 24. Appendix 3: clinical advances in MS care in xxx Worth listing here: • Any care pathways / protocols, local or national, that have been adopted, and any involvement in their development eg relapse management algorithm, rehabilitation referral pathway • Any advanced level skills, eg lumbar punctures, specialist drug clinics, specialist assessment clinics, that relieve the workload of doctors • Any new teams/clinics eg multi-disciplinary assessments • Any really new service developments, eg links with vocational rehab, how these work well and why they are desirable 24
  • 25. Appendix 4: National Service Framework for Long-term Conditions metrics In England, these metrics are designed for use by Strategic Health Authorities to compare delivery of care against the NSF for Long-term Conditions. In Scotland, the NSF doesn’t apply, and, unlike the NICE Guidelines, isn’t cited as a desirable model to follow. However, these metrics do tie in well with the requirements of the Kerr Report and the policy documents that have subsequently been issued, and may be useful as a yardstick for practice. Adapted from: Better Metrics v.7 Healthcare Commission. November 2006; available at www.osha.nhs.uk 7.01 Theme: Integrated Care Planning Objective: to ensure that people with LTNCs have an integrated multi-agency assessment and receive a person-centred care plan Proportion of people with a LTNC who have within the last 12 months • had an integrated assessment/review assessment • received a personal care plan 7.02 Theme: Better Coordination of Care Objective: to ensure that people with LTNCs who have complex needs receive well-coordinated care Metric: Proportion of people with LTNCs with complex needs who have a named individual who acts as a coordinator of their care. 7.03 Theme: Better Provision of Information to People with LTNCs Objective: to ensure that people with LTNCs receive appropriate information Description of Metric: Proportion of people with LTNCs who have received high quality information about their condition, its management, local services and how to access them, and wider social inclusion issues. 7.04 Theme: Experience of Services Objective: To improve people with LTNCs experience of services Description of Metric: Percentage of people who report a positive experience from their contact with services 7.05 Theme: Prompt recognition of symptoms, diagnosis and treatment
  • 26. Objective: to ensure that individuals suspected of having a neurological condition receive within maximum of 18 weeks: i. referral from GP to a specialist with neurological expertise ii. access to diagnostic services iii. initial treatment Description of Metric: Proportion of people with LTNCs who have received receive specialist assessment, investigations and treatment within timescales designated in NICE Guidelines where they exist, and within the 18 week PSA target where NICE Guidelines do not exist. 7.06 Theme: Improved Care Objective: To ensure that people with LTNCs on 3 or more drugs have an annual medicines review Description of Metric: Proportion of people with LTNCs on 3 or more drugs who have received a medicines review within the last 12 months 7.07 Theme: Access to specialist acute services Objective: to ensure that individuals who develop a neurosurgical or neurological emergency have rapid access to the appropriate specialist acute services and facilities Description of Metric: People with a neurosurgical or neurological emergency access as appropriate: a) critical care within 1 hour of referral b) neuroscience centre within 6 hours of referral c) spinal cord injury centre within 1 day of referral d) acute neurological team in local DGH within 1 day of referral 7.08 Theme: Access to specialist rehabilitation services Objective: to ensure that individuals with a long-term neurological condition achieve the best possible outcomes through access to appropriate rehabilitation Description of Metric: Wait times for individuals to access specialist neurorehabilitation inpatient facilities in line with national guidance 7.09 Theme: Access to specialist rehabilitation services in the community Objective: to enable and support individuals with a long-term neurological condition to lead a full life in the community through access to • rehabilitation including community neurorehabilitation • vocational rehabilitation Description of Metric: People with identified needs on the care plan for rehabilitation in the community receiving a. community neurorehabilitation (specialist team/generic team with neurological expertise) 2
  • 27. b. vocational rehabilitation 7.10 Theme: Provision of equipment and adaptations Objective: to provide timely appropriate equipment and adaptations to individuals with a long-term neurological condition Description of Metric: People with identified needs on the care plan for equipment / adaptations receive a. standard equipment within 7 working days b. bespoke items within 20 working days c. adaptations to their property (including those funded by Direct Facility Grants) within the agreed timescale and no more than 6 months d. repair/replacement of equipment no longer functioning properly within locally agreed timeframes. 7.11 Theme: Providing personal care and support Objective: to give individuals with a long-term neurological condition maximum choice about living independently at home through the offer of direct payments Description of Metric: People with LTNCs with identified needs on the care plan for assistance / support with living independently are offered the option of direct payments and the necessary support to operate it. 7.12 Theme: Providing personal care and support Objective: to give individuals with a long-term neurological condition maximum choice about remaining/returning to their own home Description of Metric: Percentage of people with a long-term neurological condition offered support to live in their own home as opposed to residential/nursing care. 7.13 Theme: Supporting Family and Carers Objective: to improve support for families and carers. Description of Metric: Percentage of carers of people with a long-term neurological condition who • have received a carers assessment • receive support appropriate to their identified needs. 7.14 Theme: Palliative Care Objective: To improve end-of-life care for people with LTNCs Description of Metric: a. % of people with a long-term neurological condition accessing palliative care services 3
  • 28. b. % of people with a long-term neurological condition who are terminally ill with evidence of good end of life care in line with NICE best practice guidance 4