Modulehandbuch Masterstudiengang Cellular

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Modulehandbuch Masterstudiengang Cellular

  1. 1. Modulehandbuch   Masterstudiengang   Cellular  &  Molecular  Neuroscience   Code Modules Coordinator ECTS Module Elements CM-01 Systems Neuroscience and Behaviour Herbert 11 • Functional Neuroanatomy • Sensory Systems Neuroscience • Motor Systems • Behavioural Neuropharmacology CM-02 Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Volkmer 11 • Molecular and Cellular Biology of Neurons and Glia • Neurochemistry and Neurotransmitters • Developmental Neurobiology • Structural Neurobiology CM-03 Neurophysiology Ehrlich 9 • Neurophysiology • Molecular and Cellular Basis of Learning and Memory • From Molecules to Circuits: The Retina as a Model System CM-04 Methods in Neuroscience I Jucker 8 • Neurohistology and Quantitative Neuromorphology • Methods in Molecular Neurobiology • Introduction to Statistics CM-05 Methods in Neuroscience II Rasse 6 • Model Organisms in Neurobiology • Microscopy and Cell Imaging Techniques CM-06 Applied and Clinical Neuroscience Jucker 12 • Genetic and Molecular Basis of Neural Diseases – Part I • Genetic and Molecular Basis of Neural Diseases – Part II • Human Neurogenetics • Neuroregeneration and Neuro-Tissue Engineering CM-07 Introduction to Current Research Herbert 8 • Journal Club • Laboratory Visits • Neurocolloquium • Retreat CM-08 Laboratory Rotations Herbert 25 • Laboratory Work + Lab Report • Seminar, Presentation of Lab Projects CM-09 Master Thesis Herbert 30 • Laboratory Work + Thesis ∑ 120 Universität Tübingen • Graduate School of Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience • October 2010
  2. 2. 2 Module Code: CM-01 Systems Neuroscience and Behaviour ECTS credit points 11 Module coordinator Prof. Dr. Horst Herbert Contact Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience, Österbergstr. 3 horst.herbert@uni-tuebingen.de phone 07071-29 77177 Duration of module 2 Semesters Cycle Annually Module elements Course title Course type Semester* Functional Neuroanatomy Lecture + Practical (1 week block) WS Sensory Systems Neuroscience Lecture WS Motor Systems Lecture SS Behavioural Neuropharmacology Lecture SS * WS = winter semester, SS = summer semester Module content In this module, we first provide an introduction to the functional organisation of the mammalian central nervous system, from the spinal cord to the neocortex. This will establish the foundation for students to follow the subsequent, more detailed lecture courses. Thereafter, the anatomy and physiology of sensory systems will be covered – from signal transduction at the sensory receptors to higher order processing and psychophysics. Comparative aspects, such as signal transduction processes, coding of sensory information and cortical representation, will be emphasized. The topics include retina and visual system, cochlea and central auditory system, somatosensory system, nociception and pain, and the chemical senses olfaction and gustation. The motor system lecture will introduce students to the principal theoretical issues guiding research on motor behaviour and motor coordination, including the architecture and functional roles of the motor systems in the control of movement as well as the disturbances of movement resulting from disease. The module will be concluded with a lecture on behavioural neuropharmacology where animal models of major neurological and psychiatric disorders will be addressed as well as the design and analysis of behavioural experiments. Qualification goals / learning targets The aim of the course is to provide students with diverse backgrounds with a common platform of theoretical and practical knowledge about the microscopic and macroscopic anatomy as well as the functional organisation of the mammalian brain. After successful completion of the module, students will be able to name and identify the major brain nuclei and their connectivity comprising the different sensory systems and motor system pathways. They will be familiar with the different types of sensory receptor cells and their signal transduction cascades. Furthermore, students will be able to differentiate the basic features of processing and coding of motor and sensory information in the different systems. Students will also have a basic understanding of major dysfunctions and diseases of motor and sensory systems afflicting human patients. Students will also know animal models employed to mimic major neurological and psychiatric diseases. Finally, they will have profound understanding of how to design behavioural experiments to test and quantify behavioural and cognitive parameters. Teaching methods The functional neuroanatomy course is a one-week block course consisting of lectures in the morning and in the afternoon followed by tutorial-style, supervised practical parts. Students are provided with plastinated human brain sections and with histological slides of different kinds of brain tissue for macroscopic and microscopic
  3. 3. 3 inspection, respectively. The remaining courses in this module are taught in lecture-style with interposed tutorials. Students are expected to review topics after class by using their class notes, the hand-outs provided and recommended additional readings, such as textbooks and articles. For the tutorials, short assignments have to be prepared and presented in class. Prerequisites for participation Basic notions of cell biology, physiology and of brain organisation are needed. Usability of the module Compulsory module in the 1st year of the master program Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience. Module requirements, exams and grading scheme The final module grade will be compiled from separate examinations. The written exam covering the functional neuroanatomy course will be held shortly after conclusion of the course and makes up 20% of the module grade. A second written exam at the end of the semester covers the sensory and motor systems lectures and makes up 60% of the module grade. For the behavioural neuropharmacology course, two extensive essays on specific topics raised in the lecture are required (20%). Workload assessment and credit points Module element Workload* CPs** Functional Neuroanatomy Co: 20h + Re: 20 + Ex: 20h = 60h 2 Sensory Systems Neuroscience Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Motor Systems Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Behavioural Neuropharmacology Co: 30h + Re: 20h + As: 40h = 90h 3 Total 11 * Co=Contact time in class + Re=review after class + As=assignments/homework + Ex=exam preparation and exam ** 30 hours workload = 1 ECTS credit point
  4. 4. 4 Module Code: CM-02 Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience ECTS Credit points 11 Module coordinator Prof. Dr. Hansjürgen Volkmer Contact Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Tübingen, Markwiesenstr. 55 72770 Reutlingen volkmer@nmi.de phone 07121-51530-44 Duration of module 2 Semesters Cycle Annually Module elements Course title Course type Semester* Molecular and Cellular Biology of Neurons and Glia Lecture WS Neurochemistry and Neurotransmitters Lecture WS Developmental Neurobiology Lecture + Student Seminar WS Structural Neurobiology Lecture SS * WS = winter semester, SS = summer semester Module content In this module, biosynthesis, structure, and function of neural biomolecules and neurotransmitters and their proposed role in neural diseases will be discussed. A broad view on the molecular biology of neurons and glia will be given at the molecular, organelle and cellular level as a pre-requisite for the understanding of structure, function, dysfunction and development of the nervous system. Specific aspects of neural protein biosynthesis and modification will establish a basis for the discussion of structural features. Biophysical methods will be explained for the understanding of protein folding. Specific examples for protein functions will be given with respect to mechanisms of cell motility provided by the dynamics of cytoskeletal components, of signal transduction in neurons, astrocytes and microglia, of the stabilization of myelin sheaths and of the formation and stabilization of synapses. Protein folding and protein misfolding will be discussed as a hallmark of neurological disorders. Finally, neurodevelopmental aspects will be introduced by presenting selected molecular and cellular mechanisms. Qualification goals / learning targets This module covers molecular and cellular elements of neurons and glial cells in the context of functional mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of neural connectivity. This knowledge enables students to understand nervous system function and dysfunction at the molecular level and allows for the integration of molecular aspects of neuroscience into a functional view. Expertise of basic principles of molecular neurobiology is combined with insights in the application of molecular biology experimentation and data interpretation. Teaching methods The majority of the module will be taught in lecture-style with interposed tutorials. Students are expected to review topics after class by using their class notes and the hand-outs provided before the lectures. Additional readings will be recommended and are available in the Graduate School’s library. For the tutorials, short assignments have to be prepared and presented in class. The seminar requires students to deal with developmental neuroscience topics in more depth. Students present seminal papers on selected topics that have been touched in the accompanying lecture. The core findings and
  5. 5. 5 conclusions of the studies will be discussed in class. Prerequisites for participation Solid background in general molecular and cell biology and in genetics. Usability of the module Compulsory module in the 1st and 2nd semester of the master program Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience. Module requirements, exams and grading scheme The module elements taught in the winter semester will be examined by a written exam (graded, makes up 90% of the module grade). For the structural neurobiology course, students have to submit 6 short essays on specific questions raised during the lectures (graded, makes up 10% of the module grade). Workload assessment and credit points Module elements Hours* CPs** Molecular and Cellular Biology of Neurons and Glia Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Neurochemistry and Neurotransmitters Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Developmental Neurobiology Co: 30h + Re: 30h + Se: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Structural Neurobiology Co: 15h + Re: 20h + As: 25h = 60h 2 Total 11 * Co=Contact time in class, Re=review after class, As=assignments/homework, Se=preparation of seminar presentation, Ex=exam preparation/exam ** 30 hours workload = 1 ECTS credit point
  6. 6. 6 Module Code: CM-03 Neurophysiology ECTS credit points 9 Module coordinator Dr. Ingrid Ehrlich Contact Centre for Integrative Neuroscience, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, Physiology of Learning and Memory ingrid.ehrlich@uni-tuebingen.de phone 07071-29 89189 Duration of module 2 Semesters Cycle Annually Module elements Course title Course type Semester* Neurophysiology Lecture WS Molecular and Cellular Basis of Learning and Memory Lecture SS From Molecules to Circuits: The Retina as a Model System Lecture SS * WS = winter semester, SS = summer semester Module content The basic computational units within the brain are the nerve cells and their synaptic contacts. A functional hallmark of nerve cells is their ability to generate electrical and chemical signals to encode, compute and transfer information. The first lecture course in this module focuses on these signals, their nature, their mechanisms of generation, their transmission and processing at the intra- and intercellular levels. Basic concepts, key experiments and methodological tools to study these issues are presented. The topics include basic signalling mechanisms (resting-, action- and synaptic potentials), and other mechanisms of neuronal signal generation such as subcellular compartmentalization of electrical and chemical signals (second messengers, e.g. calcium). Furthermore, electro- and optophysiological techniques used to investigate these signals will be discussed. These include intracellular current and voltage recordings of soma and dendrites; extracellular spike and local field potential recordings and micro stimulation, as well as cellular imaging methods (calcium and voltage optical recordings of subcellular compartments). After the foundation has been laid, the students will study more advanced, research-oriented neurophysiological topics in the summer term. One lecture course centres on cellular and synaptic plasticity that underlies learning and memory. A particular focus is on short-term and long-term synaptic potentiation and depression, their cellular and molecular mechanisms, and how they may relate to learning-driven behavioural adaptations. Furthermore, structural plasticity, particularly at spines will be discussed and how this links to functional plasticity and memory. Creating a link between the cellular and systems level, conceptual issues and current methodologies in memory research will be discussed such as combining behavioural analysis with electro- physiology and genetic approaches in various model organisms. We also present mammalian model systems to study spatial and associative memory in specific brain areas, including hippocampus and amygdala circuits. A third lecture centres on the retina as a model system. The retina can be stimulated with physiologically relevant light patterns ex-vivo while signal processing can be studied at the cellular and circuit level. This ranges from signal transduction in the photoreceptors to signal processing in interneurons and retinal output neurons, the ganglion cells. Since much information is available on retinal cell types, their morphology and function, their specific synaptic contacts, and the set of receptors and channels they express, the retina allows for investigation of complex questions of neuronal information processing. This course provides in-depth information on anatomy and function of the retina and current retina research (e.g. diversity of neuron types; graded potentials; different types of synapses; receptive fields; parallel signal pathways; visual feature-extracting circuits), with the focus on more general neuroscientific questions, for which the retina is used as a model system.
  7. 7. 7 Qualification goals / learning targets The aim is to provide students with profound knowledge and basic competences in neurophysiology and the methods employed. By the end of the module, students will understand electrical signal generation, processing and integration in neurons and the principles of transmission at chemical synapses. They will also be familiar with the basic techniques used to study neuronal processing at the single cell and small neuronal network level. Students will have a profound understanding of the cellular and molecular processes of synaptic plasticity that underlie learning and memory formation and consolidation. They will be familiar with the most commonly used model systems and techniques to study synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. They will be able to critically evaluate strengths and weaknesses of these systems to answer specific questions in contemporary memory research. Finally, they will have learned about the structure and function of the retina at the cellular and circuit level. This includes understanding advanced techniques to manipulate circuits such as gene transfer to the retina. In addition, the students will be able to evaluate the potential and limitations of the retina as a model system to understand sensory processing and neural circuit function. In summary, after successful completion of this module students will be able to apply their expertise to demanding laboratory or master thesis projects in synaptic and neural circuit physiology in various brain systems including hippocampus, neocortex, amygdala, and retina. They will be well prepared to read and critically evaluate publications dealing with neurophysiological topics. Teaching methods The module is taught in lecture-style with interposed tutorials. Students are expected to review topics after class by using their class notes, the hand-outs provided and recommended additional readings, such as textbooks and articles. For the tutorials, short assignments have to be prepared. Prerequisites for participation Basic notions of cell biology, physiology and of brain organisation are needed. Usability of the module Compulsory module in the 1st year of the master program Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience. Module requirements, exams and grading scheme The final module grade will be compiled from two written examinations. The written exam concluding the neurophysiology lecture in the winter term will make up 40% of the final grade while the one exam concluding the lectures of the summer term makes up 60%. Workload assessment and credit points Module element Workload* CPs** Neurophysiology Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Molecular and Cellular Basis of Learning and Memory Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 From Molecules to Circuits: The Retina as a Model System Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Total 9 * Co=Contact time in class + Re=review after class + As=assignments/homework + Ex=exam preparation and exam ** 30 hours workload = 1 ECTS credit point
  8. 8. 8 Module Code: CM-04 Methods in Neuroscience I ECTS Credit points 8 Module coordinator Prof. Dr. Mathias Jucker Contact Hertie Institute of Clinical Brain Research Dept. Cellular Neurology Otfried-Müller-Str. 27 mathias.jucker@uni-tuebingen.de phone 07071-29 86863 Duration of module 1 Semester Cycle Annually Module elements Course title Course type Semester* Neurohistology and Quantitative Neuromorphology Lecture + Practical (1 week block) WS Methods in Molecular Neurobiology Lecture WS Introduction to Statistics Lecture + Exercises WS * WS = winter semester Module content One course in this module covers routine histological techniques that are employed to prepare brain tissue for light, fluorescence and electron microscopical examination. This will be achieved by both theoretical and practical training with demonstrations and hands-on exercises in the laboratory. The topics covered include tissue fixation, embedding and sectioning; standard histological staining techniques; and more advanced procedures such as immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to demonstrate the expression of proteins or mRNA’s in specific brain tissue or cell types. Furthermore, this course will introduce unbiased stereological tools for quantitative morphological analysis (e.g. cell counts). The second course focuses on molecular biological techniques which are essential for the analysis of neural tissue and neuronal or glial cell cultures. The principles of different molecular biology-related techniques are explained in the context of experiments employed to solve a neurobiological problem. The lecture covers state- of-the-art DNA analysis, mRNA-related techniques, protein-related techniques for structural and functional analysis of proteins and recombinant techniques. The application of statistical techniques is ubiquitous in quantitative research and required for properly reporting and publishing one’s own results. The statistics course will provide students with basic tools needed to analyze quantitative molecular biological data. The topics include descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing as well as correlation and regression analysis. Qualification goals / learning targets At the end of the course students will have basic knowledge in various neuro-histological techniques and know the appropriate microscopical techniques to analyse the histological sections. They will also be able to assess histological data by means of microscopical inspection and can sample stereological probes to estimate quantitative data in brain tissue. Furthermore, students will have gained knowledge in modern molecular biology techniques and will be able to propose adequate methodological approaches to answer specific molecular neurobiological questions. In summary, expertise in these neurobiological methods together with basic practical skills in histological, microscopical and molecular biological techniques is an asset for students to tackle demanding laboratory rotations. Moreover, this expertise will be essential for understanding and interpretation of neurobiological experiments published in literature.
  9. 9. 9 The statistics course will provide the students with a toolkit for basic statistical analysis and an understanding of important statistical concepts. At the end, students are able to apply the basic techniques to their own data but they will also be able to critically assess the statistical techniques used in publications and be aware of the most common pitfalls in the use of statistics. Teaching methods The courses are taught in lecture-style with interposed tutorials. Students are expected to review topics after class by using their class notes and the hand-outs provided. Additional readings will be recommended and are available in the Graduate School’s library. For the tutorials, short assignments have to be prepared. The neurohistology course has integrated practical training where students get first hands-on experience in various histological and microscopical techniques. The statistics course consists of lecture-style presentations and weekly problem sheets that cover statistical exercises related to the topics covered in class. Results from the problem sheets will be presented and reviewed in class. Statistical methods will also be trained by means of computer-based tutorials. Prerequisites for participation None Usability of the module Compulsory module in the 1st semester of the master program Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience. Module requirements, exams and grading scheme In the neurohistology course, students will be examined orally in groups of two. The second lecture is concluded with a short written exam at the end of the term. The final module grade will be calculated from the results of the two examinations (50% each). • in the statistics course 60% of the homework assignments have to be achieved (pass/fail, not graded). Workload assessment and credit points Module element Hours* CPs** Neurohistology and Quantitative Neuromorphology Co: 40h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 10h = 90h 3 Methods in Molecular Neurobiology Co: 20h + Re: 20h + As: 10h + Ex: 10h = 60h 2 Introduction to Statistics Co: 30h + Re: 20h + As: 40h = 90h 3 Total 8 * Co=Contact time in class, Re=review after class, As=assignments/homework, Se=preparation of seminar presentation, Ex=exam preparation/exam ** 30 hours workload = 1 ECTS credit point
  10. 10. 10 Module Code: CM-05 Methods in Neuroscience II ECTS Credit points 6 Module coordinator Dr. Tobias Rasse Contact Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research JRG Synaptic Plasticity Paul-Ehrlich-Str. 17 tobias.rasse@uni-tuebingen.de phone 07071 - 29 81948 Duration of module 1 Semester Cycle Annually Module elements Course title Course type Semester* Microscopy and Cell Imaging Techniques Lecture + Practical SS Model Organisms in Neurobiology Lecture + Student Seminar SS * SS = summer semester Module content The module is composed of topics that aim at providing a coherent overview on major methods widely used in cellular and molecular neuroscience. Microscopical and cell imaging techniques will be presented in one course, from their physical and optical basis to their strength and pitfalls. In addition to light and fluorescence microscopy, the course will cover the basic principles of high resolution confocal and 2-Photon microscopy as well as imaging techniques beyond the diffraction barrier (STED and TIRF microscopy). Additionally, molecular imaging techniques will be presented (FRAP, FLIP, FRET, FLIM, calcium imaging) to investigate and quantify cellular processes, protein-turnover or protein-protein interactions. Practical exercises in the end of the course will help to back-up the theoretical training. A second course introduces model organisms commonly used in neurobiological research (C. elegans, Drosophila, zebrafish, and mouse) and demonstrates the power of genetically modified animals for studying neuronal functions at the cellular and molecular level. The main focus lies on their general properties (anatomy and physiology with a focus on the nervous system and behaviour, practical aspects of housing); on the description and comparative evaluation of modern molecular tools that are used to generate genetically modified model organisms (including transgenic over-expressing or knock-out animals); and also on cell type-specific and inducible mutants (Cre/lox site-specific recombination system). Qualification goals / learning targets After completion of the module, students will have a profound theoretical knowledge and basic practical skills in state-of-the-art microscopical techniques employed in modern neuroscience. They will be able to differentiate between the various microscopical techniques, their mode of operation and, most importantly, be able to critically evaluate their application in order to answer specific scientific questions, such as visualizing proteins, cellular compartments or even cells in vivo. Students will also be able to interpret and draw information from microscopical images they produce or encounter in publications. Furthermore, students will be acquainted with widely used neurobiological model organisms and their particular strengths and limitations for the analysis of neuronal functions. The lectures will also cover recent applications of model organisms to illustrate how they can be used in contemporary neuroscience, for instance, to molecularly dissect mechanisms of behaviour or learning and memory. This knowledge will also enable students to critically evaluate publications which are based on the use of such model organisms.
  11. 11. 11 In summary, such competences, together with the expertise acquired in module CM-04 in the winter term, will be an asset for students to successfully perform their laboratory rotations and later their master thesis. Furthermore, this expertise will be essential for understanding and interpreting neurobiological data published in the literature. Teaching methods The courses are largely taught in lecture-style with interposed tutorials. Students are expected to review topics after class by using their class notes and the hand-outs provided. Additional readings will be recommended and are available in the Graduate School’s library. For the tutorials, short assignments have to be prepared. The microscopy course has integrated practical training where students get hands-on experience in various microscopical techniques. Students have to submit a short written report about their practical mini-project. The lecture course on model organisms is combined with a seminar where students have to give presentations on specific topics raised in the lecture. Prerequisites for participation Successful completion of module CM-04 (Methods in Neuroscience I). Usability of the module Compulsory module in the 2nd semester of the master program Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience. Module requirements, exams and grading scheme Before admission to the final module examination, students have to fulfil the following requirements: • paper presentation in the course “Model Organisms in Neurobiology” (not graded), • presentation of a small lab project and submission of a brief written report about the project in the microscopy course, The final module examination consists of a 2 hour written exam covering the topics taught in this module. Workload assessment and credit points Module element Hours* CPs** Microscopy and Cell Imaging Techniques Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Model Organisms in Neurobiology Co: 30h + Re: 30h + Se: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Total 6 * Co=Contact time in class, Re=review after class, As=assignments/homework, Se=preparation of seminar presentation, Ex=exam preparation/exam ** 30 hours workload = 1 ECTS credit point
  12. 12. 12 Module Code: CM-06 Applied and Clinical Neuroscience ECTS Credit points 12 Module coordinator Prof. Dr. Mathias Jucker Contact Hertie-Institute of Clinical Brain Research Dept. Cellular Neurology Otfried-Müller-Str. 27 mathias.jucker@uni-tuebingen.de phone 07071-29 86863 Duration of module 2 Semesters Cycle Annually Module elements Course title Course type Semester* Genetic and molecular basis of neural diseases I Lecture WS Genetic and molecular basis of neural diseases II Lecture SS Human Neurogenetics Lecture SS Neuroregeneration and Neuro-Tissue Engineering Lecture + Student Seminar SS * WS = winter semester, SS = summer semester Module content This module aims at understanding the pathophysiology and the preclinical and clinical therapeutic targets of major neural diseases. In the first part of the module, neurodegenerative diseases with aging as the major risk factor, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, are discussed. In most of these diseases, whether they manifest as dementias or movement disorders, misfolding and/or aggregation of specific proteins occur. Although it is not proven that protein aggregations are always the cause for the disease, the focus of this lecture will be on learning how these aggregations develop, how they relate to the disease pathomechanisms, and why the aging brain is a risk factor. In the second part of the module, we will discuss the molecular pathophysiology of neural diseases in which neurodegeneration is believed to be a secondary event, such as cerebrovascular diseases, brain cancer, or to some extent demyelinating diseases such a multiple sclerosis. Finally, schizophrenia and autism are discussed as example of neural diseases with a disruption of the neural communications rather than actual neuron loss as the underlying pathophysiology. Many aspects of the above mentioned neural diseases are based on the discovery of genetic mutations causing rare Mendelian variants of the respective disorders. Thus, the course on human neurogenetics provides the basic principles of inheritance and variability of the human genome, with special reference to disease relevant aspects such as penetrance, expressivity and epigenetics. Finally, the lectures on neuroregeneration provide basic and applied principles of molecular and cellular neuro- regeneration in acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases. The role of neuronal plasticity, axonal regeneration and stem cell biology will be discussed as well as their potential to promote recovery of function. Qualification goals / learning targets At the end of the course the students will know the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of major neural diseases. They will have an understanding of “tauopathies”, “synucleinopathies”, “amyloidosis”, and “triplet repeat disorders”. Furthermore, the students will understand the molecular and pathological commonalities of the diseases as well as disease-specific lesions and dysfunctions. Based on the molecular and cellular patho- mechanisms for each disease the students will be able to identify potential therapeutic targets. Similarly, the students will know the basic principles of neuroregeneration and applied examples of stimulated neuro-
  13. 13. 13 regeneration after acute and chronic injury. Students will gain insight into the genetics underlying the major neural diseases and will learn to understand the most important technological advances in genetics, such as gene sequencing, linkage analysis and chip- technology. The consequences of these advances, from diagnostic and predictive genetic testing to the development of animal models and novel treatment strategies, will be outlined. Teaching methods Courses in this module largely consist of lecture-style teaching with interposed tutorials. Students are expected to review topics after class by using their class notes, the hand-outs provided and the textbooks and journal articles recommended by the lecturer. For the tutorials, short assignments have to be prepared and presented in class. The seminar requires students to deal with specific aspects of neuroregeneration in more depth. Students present seminal papers on selected topics that have been touched in the accompanying lecture. The core findings and conclusions of the studies will be discussed in class. Prerequisites for participation Profound knowledge in cell and molecular biology of neurons and glial cells. Usability of the module Compulsory module in the 1st and 2nd semester of the master program Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience. Module requirements, exams and grading scheme The lecture on genetic and molecular basis (part I) will be concluded with a written exam at the end of the winter term (30% of the final grade). The lecture on genetic and molecular basis (part II) and the neurogenetics lecture will be examined together with a written exam at the end of the summer term (50% of the final grade). For the neuroregeneration course, students have to prepare and to present a talk on a more specialized topic not covered in the lecture (20% of the final grade). The final module grade will be calculated from the individual examinations. Workload assessment and credit points Module element Hours* CPs** Genetic and molecular basis of neural diseases I Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Genetic and molecular basis of neural diseases II Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Human Neurogenetics Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Ex: 20h = 90h 3 Neuroregeneration and Neuro-Tissue Engineering Co: 30h + Re: 30h + As: 10h + Se: 20h = 90h 3 Total 12 * Co=Contact time in class, Re=review after class, As=assignments/homework, Se=preparation of seminar presentation, Ex=exam preparation/exam ** 30 hours workload = 1 ECTS credit point
  14. 14. 14 Module Code: CM-07 Introduction to Current Research ECTS Credit points 8 Module coordinator Prof. Dr. Horst Herbert Contact Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience Österbergstr. 3 horst.herbert@uni-tuebingen.de phone 07071-29 77177 Duration of module 2 Semesters Cycle Annually Module elements Course title Course type Semester* Journal Club Journal Club WS Laboratory Visits Tutorial WS + SS Neurocolloquium Talks (invited speakers) WS + SS Weekend Seminar / Retreat (changing topics) Student Seminar SS * WS = winter semester, SS = summer semester Module content For the journal club, students will be provided with a reading list of most recent publications. The papers will be briefly introduced by the lecturer and their selection for the journal club will be justified. Students will sign up for one specific paper and will present the essentials of the study in one of the following sessions. They also have to prepare questions derived from the study which will be discussed in class. The journal club will acquaint the graduate students with key publications in their field of study and help them keep up with most recent findings in their field. Students will visit local laboratories in order to get to know the scientists, their labs and their research. Students spend an afternoon per week in various labs (16 in total) and get an introduction in ongoing projects. After the lab visits, students will be provided with recent publications from the labs visited and write short essays on specific scientific questions addressed in the papers. The Neurocolloquium is a long standing, fortnightly seminar series organized by the Tübingen neuroscience community. The seminar presents internationally renowned researchers from various fields of neuroscience. The talks have a review-like character providing an overview on state-of-the-art neuroscience topics, from genes to behaviour and new methodologies. Students will get the opportunity to choose speakers of their interest and meet with them before and after the talk. Once a year, the master students of the two Graduate Schools will jointly attend a retreat where they present and discuss topics that are generally not part of their regular curricular course program such as: “Sex Differences in the Brain”, “From Basic Science to Marketable Drugs”, “Neuroprosthetics”, “Executive Functions”, “Philosophy of Mind, Ethics in Neuroscience”, and “Animals in Neuroscience Research”. The seminar topics are usually chosen cooperatively by students and staff and do change every year. Qualification goals / learning targets The intention of this module is to introduce students to a wide spectrum of current neuroscientific topics. The journal club, the talks in the Neurocolloquium, the lab visits in Tübingen and the retreat complement one another at best to achieve this goal and provide insights in state-of-the-art neuroscience research. The journal club will improve the students' skills of understanding and debating current topics of interest in their field and they have to critically evaluate the findings published in recent articles: are the results of the study valid,
  15. 15. 15 how useful are the results and do the results lead to new research or to new applications. Furthermore, the adequacy of the research design, the controls used and the statistics employed can be discussed. Writing the essays after the lab visits will train students in scientific writing and it provides further insight in current research topics in Tübingen. Students will have gained insights for the selection of upcoming laboratory rotations and, eventually, a project for the master thesis. The Neurocolloquium introduces students to a wide range of neuroscience research and make them “look beyond their own noses”. Of the 8 speakers visiting per semester, 2-3 speakers will be selected, invited and hosted by students of the Graduate Schools. By doing so, students actively participate in organizing a seminar series and will thereby gain organizational skills and social competence. After successful accomplishment of the retreat, students will have achieved skills that are required for scientific work in general, including literature search and preparation and presentation of a seminar talk on an unfamiliar topic. In addition to discussing scientific topics, these retreats are also meant as social events where students from the two master programs meet with scientists and lecturer in a beautiful setting and a relaxed ambiance to get to know each other and to potentially initiate local co-operations. Teaching methods The journal club and the retreat require students to deal with new, as yet unfamiliar neuroscience topics in more depth. The students present talks on selected seminal papers or more general topics. The core findings and conclusions of the presentation will be discussed after the talk. The laboratory visits consist of 1 hour introductory lectures and guided tours through the laboratories with demonstrations of set-ups and selected experiments. The Neurocolloquium is a seminar series with invited speakers. Prerequisites for participation For the laboratory visits, students are required to familiarize themselves beforehand with the labs and their research topics through publications and websites. Usability of the module Compulsory module in the 1st and 2nd semester of the master program Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience. Module requirements, exams and grading scheme Journal Club: Students will be provided with a reading list and the respective papers have to be read before each session. Every student has to read one paper in detail and to present the essentials of the study in one of the sessions. Laboratory visits: Students have to submit 2-3 page long essays based on selected papers from the labs visited. From the 8 labs visited per term, students may choose 4 topics/papers for their essays. Submission deadline for the 4 essays per term will be announced before the start of every term. Neurocolloquium: Regular attendance is required and, in addition, one essay on one of the topics presented has to be submitted. Two to three speakers per term will be invited by the student’s body. Students meet with these scientists for one hour before the actual talk to discuss with them recent neuroscientific topics (attendance required). Weekend Seminar: Successful participation of the retreat requires, in addition to attendance of all talks of one seminar session, presentation of a 30 minute talk including hand-out on a selected topic. This module is not graded (pass/fail).
  16. 16. 16 Workload assessment and credit points Module element Workload* CPs** Journal Club Co: 30h + As: 20h + Se: 10h = 60 h 2 Laboratory Visits (16 labs in total in WS and SS) Co: 60h + As: 30h = 90h 3 Neurocolloquium (14 talks in total in WS and SS) Co: 21h + As: 9h = 30h 1 Weekend Seminar / Retreat (3 days) Co: 30h + Se: 30h = 60h 2 Total 8 * Co=Contact time in class, Re=review after class, As=assignments/homework, Se=preparation of seminar presentation ** 30 hours workload = 1 ECTS credit point Module Code: CM-08 Laboratory Rotations ECTS Credit points 25 Module coordinator Prof. Dr. Horst Herbert Contact Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience Österbergstr. 3 horst.herbert@uni-tuebingen.de phone 07071-29 77177 Duration of module 18 weeks Cycle Annually Module elements Course title Course type Semester* 1st Laboratory Rotation Practical WS + Presentation of Laboratory Projects Student Seminar 2nd Laboratory Rotation Practical WS + Presentation of Laboratory Projects Student Seminar * WS = winter semester Module content Students are required to perform two laboratory rotations (18-weeks total, all day) where they work on small research projects in laboratories of their choice. In general, the assigned study is in line with currently ongoing research in the respective laboratory and supervised by an advanced doctoral student or a postdoc. The lab projects have to be concluded with a written report (formatted like a scientific paper) and an oral presentation during a seminar at the end of the rotation which provides a platform for the students to present their research projects. The curriculum requires students to perform two experimental lab rotations which should ideally be performed in different research groups with distinct scientific questions and different methods. Qualification goals / learning targets During the lab rotations, students will acquire a wide range of practical skills in state-of-the-art methods and they get to know current scientific questions and research approaches. The skills trained during lab rotations include literature survey, planning of research project and design of experiments, documentation of data generated,
  17. 17. 17 critical evaluation and interpretation of results, compiling data for and writing of a report and, also, train social competences during collaboration with other members of the hosting research group. In the end, students have also learned to prepare and give an oral presentation on their research project. Teaching methods Supervised practical training in the laboratory, including reading of research papers, writing of a report formatted like a scientific paper, oral presentation and discussion of the research findings. The student’s progress is monitored through weekly meetings with his supervisor. Prerequisites for participation Successful completion of the winter / summer semester modules and project-specific knowledge covered in the winter / summer semester, respectively. Usability of the module Compulsory module in the 1st and 3rd semester of the master program Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience. Module requirements, exams and grading scheme The student’s performance will be assessed and graded by the supervisor according to the following criteria: understanding of theoretical framework and literature overview (15%), practical work in the lab (30%), generation of own ideas (10%), oral presentation of the project and discussion in the seminar (15%), written lab report (30%). Workload assessment and credit points Module element Workload * CPs** 1st Laboratory rotation Co: 7w = 280h 9 Writing of report, preparing presentation, seminar LR/Se: 7d = 56h 2 2nd Laboratory rotation Co: 9w = 360h 12 Writing of report, preparing presentation, seminar LR/Se: 7d = 56h 2 Total 752 h 25 * Co=contact time in laboratory, LR=writing of laboratory report, Se=preparation of seminar presentation, w=weeks, d=days, h=hours ** 30 hours workload = 1 ECTS credit point
  18. 18. 18 Module Code: CM-09 Master Thesis ECTS Credit points 30 Module coordinator Prof. Dr. Horst Herbert Contact Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience horst.herbert@uni-tuebingen.de phone 07071-29 77177 Duration of module 6 months Cycle once Course title Course type Semester* Experimental Master Thesis Research project SS *SS = summer semester Module content To complete their studies, students are required to prepare a master thesis in a laboratory of their choice. In general, the assigned study is in line with currently ongoing research in the respective laboratory and supervised by the group leader or at least by an advanced postdoc. The experimental master thesis will train students to perform research more or less independently within a given period of time. The master’s project will be concluded with a written thesis which is formatted like a scientific paper. Qualification goals / learning targets After successful completion of the master thesis, students have acquired profound practical skills in state-of-the- art methods applied in neuroscience. They are acquainted with current neuroscientific questions and recent publications in this field. They are trained in compiling and analyzing data for a scientific paper and in writing a scientific report. In addition to scientific expertise, students will acquire soft skills, such as time and project management, working in international, interdisciplinary teams, English communication and writing skills, and rules of responsible conduct of research. Overall, with successful completion of the thesis students proof their scientific competence and demonstrate that they are prepared to tackle a demanding doctoral project. Teaching methods Supervised practical training in a laboratory, including reading of research papers and writing of a master thesis. Prerequisites for participation Successful completion of all theoretical and practical course requirements. Usability of the module Compulsory module in the 4th semester of the master course Neural & Behavioural Sciences. Module requirements, exams and grading scheme Students are required to submit - after 6 months of work - 3 copies of their thesis to the office of the Graduate School. At the student’s request and upon hearing the supervisor, the examination board may grant an extension of the submission deadline for up to 4 weeks at most. Two readers, one of which is the supervisor, will evaluate the thesis. The examination board will appoint the second reader. Workload assessment and credit points Module element Workload CPs* Master Thesis 23 w x 5 d x 8 h = 920 h 30 * 30 hours workload = 1 ECTS credit point (w=weeks, d=days, h=hours)

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