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  • 1. Psychology 301 Cognitive Neuroscience Fall 2010 Course Objectives: The goal of this course is to introduce ideas linking human behavior with what is happening in the brain. Cognitive neuroscience continues to be a “hot” field and there is much enthusiasm about the applications of this research. This is evidenced by the fair amount of government funding allocated to this research and the regularity with which articles appear on this topic in the popular press. For example, TIME devoted an entire issue to this research entitled “The Brain: A User’s Guide” in January of 2007. Understanding the intricacies of cognitive neuroscience will help you to evaluate claims made by the media and policymakers concerning the applications of this kind of research. Can we detect if someone is lying using fMRI? Should students learning math be banned from using calculators in class because their frontal lobes are not active when they do so? These questions are of interest to society at large because they have implications for criminology, education, advertising, etc… After completing this course, you will have a basic understanding of neuroscientific methods, the anatomy of the brain, and how the brain gives rise to cognition, action, and emotion. This knowledge will help you to interpret for yourself how this research should be used and to what extent these findings are applicable to more wide-ranging issues. Instructor: Susan Ravizza Psychology Building, 285C 432-3366 ravizzas@msu.edu Office hours: Thursday, 10:00 – 11:00 am and by appointment Required reading: 1) MS Gazzaniga, RB Ivry, GR Mangun. “Cognitive Neuroscience: The Biology of the Mind” 3rd Edition (2008) 2) Journal articles posted on Angel. Course grading: Exams (3) 75% Weekly pop quizzes (10 out of 13 possible) 25% Exams: There will be three exams (2 midterms and a final). Each exam will be composed of three parts: 1) multiple choice, 2) fill-in-the blank, and 3) short answer. The Final Exam will be held on December 15th , 12:45-2:45 pm in our regular classroom. The final exam will NOT be cumulative.
  • 2. Emergencies and Schedule Conflicts You may take a makeup exam in case of: 1) a documented medical emergency, or 2) a schedule conflict that you know about in advance such as a religious holiday or sports travel. In either case, please send email identifying the emergency ASAP. In case of a schedule conflict, you must send this email at least a week in advance of exam day. Do not assume I have gotten your email unless I have responded to you. In either case, you may take the exam either at a different time on the exam day or the day after. If you cannot take the exam on one of those two days, then that exam will be omitted from your final score and its points distributed over the other exams. If you miss an exam for any other reason, or don’t notify me about your emergency or conflict, your score will be 0. Weekly pop quizzes The purpose of the pop quizzes is to give students a chance to think about and integrate the previous week’s lecture and reading materials. Quizzes will consist of 5 multiple choice or fill-in-the blank questions. Pop quizzes are not scheduled, but will occur once a week on either Tuesday or Thursday. Pop quizzes will begin in Week 3 of the course and end the final week of class (Week 15). If a pop quiz is missed, it cannot be made up. Quizzes are pass/fail and a passing grade consists of answering 3 out of 5 questions correctly. The final quiz score will be based on your top 10 quiz grades. Lectures and Readings Date Lect Topic Textbook 9/2/09 1 What is cognitive neuroscience? 9/7/09 2 Principles of Neuroscience GAZ 1,2 9/9/09 3 Mapping the Brain GAZ 3 Article #1 9/14/09 4 Cognitive Neuropsychology GAZ 4: 110-148 9/16/09 5 Imaging the Brain GAZ 4: 148-159 9/21/09 6 Cognitive Neuroscience 9/23/09 7 Perception: The visual system GAZ 5 Article #2 9/28/09 8 Perception: Object recognition GAZ 6 9/30/09 9 Perception: Are faces special? Article #3 10/5/09 Exam 1 10/7/09 10 Attention: Pathways and disorders GAZ 12: 491-501,
  • 3. 537-548 10/12/09 11 Attention: Component analysis GAZ 12: 502-536 Article #4 10/14/09 12 Consciousness: Perception and Awareness GAZ 12: 548 – 552 10/19/09 13 Memory: Pathways and disorders GAZ 8 10/21/09 14 Memory: Functional dissociations Article #5 10/26/09 15 Memory: Long-term knowledge 10/28/09 16 Language: Pathways and disorders GAZ 10: 388-432 Article #6 11/2/09 17 Language: Functional analysis GAZ 10: 433-442 11/4/09 Exam 2 11/9/09 18 Hemispheric specialization GAZ 11 11/11/09 19 Motor: Pathways and disorders GAZ 7: 257-271, 288-307 11/16/09 CLASS CANCELLED: Society for Neuroscience conference 11/18/09 20 Motor: Representation of action GAZ 7: 271-288 11/23/09 21 Motor: Component analysis Article #7 11/25/09 HOLIDAY: NO CLASSES 11/30/09 22 Executive: Goal-oriented behavior GAZ 13: Article #8 12/1/09 23 Emotion: Monitoring behavior GAZ 9 12/7/09 24 Social Neuroscience GAZ 14 Article #9 12/9/09 25 Review/Wrap-up 12/15/09 FINAL EXAM (12:45-2:45 pm)
  • 4. Academic Honesty: Article 2.3.3 of the Academic Freedom Report states that "The student shares with the faculty the responsibility for maintaining the integrity of scholarship, grades, and professional standards." In addition, the Psychology Department adheres to the policies on academic honesty as specified in General Student Regulations 1.0, Protection of Scholarship and Grades; the all-University Policy on Integrity of Scholarship and Grades; and Ordinance 17.00, Examinations. (See Spartan Life: Student Handbook and Resource Guide and/or the MSU Web site: www.msu.edu.) Therefore, unless authorized by your instructor, you are expected to complete all course assignments, including homework, lab work, quizzes, tests and exams, without assistance from any source. You are expected to develop original work for this course; therefore, you may not submit course work you completed for another course to satisfy the requirements for this course. Also, you are not authorized to use the www.allmsu.com Web site to complete any course work in Psychology 493. Students who violate MSU academic integrity rules may receive a penalty grade, including a failing grade on the assignment or in the course. Contact your instructor if you are unsure about the appropriateness of your course work. (See also http://www.msu.edu/unit/ombud/dishonestyFAQ.html )
  • 5. Psychology 493W Cognitive Neuroscience Fall 2009 Reading list (articles posted on ANGEL): 1. Centenary of Brodmann’s map – conception and fate – Zilles & Amunts 2. Blindsight depends on the lateral geniculate nucleus – Schmid et al. 3. Internal and external features of the face are represented holistically in face- selective regions of visual cortex - Andrews et al 4. Attention enhances the neural processing… - Polk et al. 5. Resistance to forgetting associated with hippocampus-mediated reactivation during new learning – Kuhl et al. 6. How the brain repairs stuttering – Kell et al 7. Learning-related fine-scale specificity imaged in motor cortex circuits of behaving mice – Komiyama et al 8. Putting Brain training to the test – Owen et al 9. When giving is good: ventromedial prefrontal cortex activation for others’ intentions
  • 6. Psychology 493W Cognitive Neuroscience Fall 2009 Reading list (articles posted on ANGEL): 1. Centenary of Brodmann’s map – conception and fate – Zilles & Amunts 2. Blindsight depends on the lateral geniculate nucleus – Schmid et al. 3. Internal and external features of the face are represented holistically in face- selective regions of visual cortex - Andrews et al 4. Attention enhances the neural processing… - Polk et al. 5. Resistance to forgetting associated with hippocampus-mediated reactivation during new learning – Kuhl et al. 6. How the brain repairs stuttering – Kell et al 7. Learning-related fine-scale specificity imaged in motor cortex circuits of behaving mice – Komiyama et al 8. Putting Brain training to the test – Owen et al 9. When giving is good: ventromedial prefrontal cortex activation for others’ intentions