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Central Michigan University Document Transcript

  • 1. Central Michigan University College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences College Curriculum Committee MINUTESDate: December 10, 2007 Location: Anspach 113 Time: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.Curriculum Chair: Interim Associate Dean, Mitchell HallCurriculum Secretary: Executive Secretary, Suzanne Sovawebsite: www.chsbs.cmich.eduE-Mail: chsbscur@cmich.eduPhone: 989-774-3342Committee Representatives Present:Bill Spruiell (ENG), Keith Palka (FLLC), Mick Kolinski (MSC), Neil Christiansen(FLLC), Roger Hatch PHL&REL, Jean Toner (SASW)Committee Representatives Absent: Doina Harsanyi (HST), Moataz Fattah (PSC)I. ITEMS TO THE UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE A. Course Requests 1. Items for Publication a. New Courses b. Course Deletions C. Course Changes 2. Items for Action a. New Designator “NSC” for Neuroscience Courses ApprovedII. ITEMS TO THE GRADUATE COUNCIL A. Course Requests 1. Items for Publication a. New Courses (1) NSC 501 Principles of Neuroscience I 4 (4-0) Bulletin Description: First of two core neuroscience graduate courses providing comprehensive coverage of neuroscience fundamentals. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Neuroscience Graduate Program or permission of instructor. Approved (2) NSC 502 Principles of Neuroscience II 4 (4-0) Bulletin Description: Second of two core neuroscience graduate courses providing comprehensive coverage of neuroscience fundamentals. Prerequisites: NSC 501 or permission of instructor Approved (3) NSC 690 Research Seminar in Neuroscience 1-4 (spec) Bulletin Description: Seminar emphasizing review of the primary literature in several areas of neuroscience. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Neuroscience Program or permission of instructor. Approved B. Curricular Change Requests c. New Academic Program Requests 1. Items for Action (1) Doctor of Philosophy in Neuroscience
  • 2. I. General description of proposed program, including its objectives andactivities.(Include objectives stated in terms of student learning.)The proposed Ph.D. Program in Neuroscience at Central Michigan Universityrepresents an interdisciplinary program, integrating courses, research, andclinical opportunities from three Colleges and several departments, includingBiology, Chemistry, Health Sciences, Rehabilitation and Medical Sciences,Communication Disorders, and Psychology. The core curriculum of the proposedprogram will be a combination of foundation courses, including a two-semester corecourse in the principles of neuroscience, a seminar course in neuroscience duringeach of the first four semesters, an advanced seminar course to be taken in thelast two years of the program, a two semester-long statistics/research designcourses, specialized electives (which are to be chosen in close consultation withthe student’s advisor), a Master’s thesis (with oral defense), a major paper andqualifying exam, and a dissertation (with oral defense). The Program is a spin-offprogram of the existing Ph.D. Program in Applied Experimental Psychology, and usestheir successful mentorship model. The advantage of the new proposed Program isthat it will allow a greater focus on neuroscience-related courses and giveneuroscience students more flexibility in choosing electives (see Appendix A for alist of potential electives) from various departments, thereby enhancing theinterdisciplinary nature of the Program’s curricula. The Program is designed tomeet these objectives by providing all students with a solid core curriculum, alongwith sufficient flexibility to allow each student to tailor his or her courseworkto meet his or her individual objectives.Most of the course work in the proposed Program will be done during the first twoyears, which will comprise all of the required coursework for the M.S. inNeuroscience. Students who have obtained their M.S. degree will become candidatesfor the Ph.D. in Neuroscience after they have completed 30 credits beyond the M.S.degree and have successfully passed an oral defense of a major paper (apublication-quality research project). All Ph.D. candidates are required tocomplete an empirical dissertation project and pass an oral defense of thedissertation) in order to obtain the Ph.D.In terms of learning outcomes, students earning this degree will be able to:Demonstrate a comprehension of neuroscience principles at a graduate-school level; 2. Utilize advanced statistical techniques to analyze research data; 3. Produce written and oral critiques which analyze, synthesize,and integrate information from various perspectives in theneuroscience literature; 4. Formulate hypotheses and craft a research proposal thataddresses an important question in neuroscience in a mannerconsistent with current ethical guidelines; 5. Produce a high-quality thesis and provide an oral defense of it;6. Write a publishable-quality major paper and provide an oral defense of it;7. Present his or her research at a national or international meeting;8. Craft a publishable-quality dissertation and provide an oral defense of it.In summary, the major objective of the proposed Ph.D. Program in Neuroscience is toprovide students with the requisite academic background, technical skills, andhands-on research experience that will allow them to successfully compete forneuroscience-related jobs in the private and public sectors. Students in theproposed program will receive a solid theoretical foundation, as well as attaininghigh-level technical skills and extensive research experience. Students whocomplete this program will receive excellent training for technical and/or researchpositions in either the private or public sectors, including jobs in academia, oras researchers in pharmaceutical companies, hospitals and biotechnology firms,including the newly emerging ‘neurotechnology’ industry.
  • 3. II. New courses to be incorporated in the proposed new program (if any) NSC 501 (Principles of Neuroscience I) NSC 502 (Principles of Neuroscience II) NSC 600 (Special Issues) NSC 690 (Research Seminar in Neuroscience) NSC 696 (Directed Research) NSC 697 (Independent Study) NSC 789 (Advanced Seminar in Neuroscience) NSC 798 (Thesis: Design) NSC 799 (Thesis: Implementation) NSC 800 (Research in Neuroscience) NSC 898 (Dissertation: Proposal) NSC 899 (Dissertation: Implementation, with oral defense)III. Requested Bulletin copy (Show as requested to appear in the Bulletin.)Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Neuroscience: 90 hoursMinimum Totals for Graduation:The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Neuroscience Program at Central MichiganUniversity is designed to give each student a comprehensive understanding of thecore principles in neuroscience and the requisite training that will preparestudents for positions in academics, industry, or government that utilize highlytrained research skills in specific areas of neuroscience. The foundation of theProgram is provided during the first two years, which encompasses all therequirements for the Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Neuroscience. Throughoutthe program, all students are expected to be actively involved in research with aProgram faculty member, who serves as a mentor. Upon receiving the M.S. degree inNeuroscience (or its equivalent, for students who enter the Ph.D. Program aftertheir second year), students will work closely with their mentor to establish aline of research that will lead to a publishable-quality major paper anddissertation. As such, the focus of the Ph.D. Program in Neuroscience is to buildupon the student’s broad-based and comprehensive understanding of the basicprinciples of neuroscience and develop a strong background for applied research insome specific area of neuroscience. Current areas of specific research traininginclude studying the causes and potential treatments for respiratory disorders andfor Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases.Admission, Retention, and Termination StandardsApplication Deadline for all Materials: March 1The application deadline for receipt of all materials will be March 1. Whenapplying for the Ph.D. degree in Neuroscience, applicants must send three lettersof reference, official transcripts, and official GRE scores directly to the ProgramDirector. Applicants are expected to complete a Bachelor of Science degree, haveat least 15 hours of courses in neuroscience, chemistry, and/or biology (includingbiologically-based psychology courses), have at least 3 hours of statistics, andhave a 3.0 grade point average (on a 4.0 scale) to gain admittance to the program.Preference will be given to students with prior research experience, especially inthe area of neuroscience. Students who are deficient in certain subject areas,such as statistics or chemistry, will be expected to make up these deficiencies inaddition to the normally prescribed graduate coursework for the degree. A maximumof 9 credit hours earned during non-degree status may be applied toward the M.S. orPh.D. degree in Neuroscience.The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Neuroscience is based upon the satisfactorycompletion of a minimum of 90 semester hours of graduate work, including thesuccessful completion of the Principles of Neuroscience courses and successfulcompletion of a thesis (with oral defense). Students who are unable to pass thecomprehensive examination for the Principles of Neuroscience courses after threeattempts will be dismissed from the program. Students who complete the requiredcoursework for the first two years and successfully defend their thesis will attainM.S. in Neuroscience 3
  • 4. the Master of Science in Neuroscience degree. Thus, each Ph.D. student mustcomplete the equivalent of all the requirements for the M.S. degree inNeuroscience. Upon completion of the requirements for the M.S. degree inNeuroscience, students will be required to complete NSC 800 (a major paper withoral defense) for their qualifying exam. Upon satisfactory completion of theirqualifying exam, the student is an official Ph.D. candidate in the Program.Students who do not successfully defend their major paper by the third attempt willbe dismissed from the Program. Upon completion of the remaining course requirementsand following the successful oral defense of the dissertation, the student willreceive the Ph.D. in Neuroscience degree. All other retention and terminationstandards for the program follow University policy as specified in the GraduateBulletin.Program RequirementsAdmission to doctoral candidacy is based upon satisfactory grades (i.e.,maintaining a minimum 3.0 grade point average), completion of thesis requirements,and completion of both semesters of the Principles of Neuroscience (NSC 501 and NSC502) or passing the comprehensive examination for these courses, and successfullycompleting NSC 800. The doctoral degree is awarded upon the successful defense ofthe doctoral dissertation.Degree RequirementsRequired Courses (54-72 hours)NSC 501 - Principles of Neuroscience I 4(4-0)NSC 502 - Principles of Neuroscience II 4(4-0)PSY 511 – Statistics in Psychology 3(3-1)PSY 611 – Research Design 3(3-0)NSC 690 – Research Seminar in Neuroscience 1-4(Spec)NSC 789 – Graduate Seminar in Neuroscience 1-12(Spec)NSC 798 – Thesis: Design 1-3(Spec)NSC 799 – Thesis: Implementation 1-3(Spec)NSC 800 – Research in Neuroscience 1-12(Spec)NSC 898 – Doctoral Dissertation: Design 1-12(Spec)NSC 899 – Doctoral Dissertation: Implementation 1-12(Spec)Note: A minimum of 4 hours of NSC 690, 6 hours of NSC 789, 6 hours from acombination of NSC 798 and NSC 799, 6 hours of NSC 800, and 18 credit hours fromthe combination of PSY 898 and PSY 899 is required. In addition to course work, astudent must complete an oral examination over the thesis, major paper (NSC 800),and the dissertation.Electives (18-36 hours)To be chosen in consultation with an advisor.Total: 90 semester hoursApproved (2) M.S. Degree in NeuroscienceI. General description of proposed program, including its objectives andactivities.(Include objectives stated in terms of student learning.)The proposed M.S. Program in Neuroscience at Central Michigan University representsan interdisciplinary program, integrating courses, research and clinicalopportunities from three Colleges and several departments, including Biology,Chemistry, Health Sciences, Rehabilitation and Medical Sciences, CommunicationDisorders, and Psychology. The core curriculum of the proposed program will be acombination of foundation courses, including a year-long core course in theprinciples of neuroscience, a seminar course in neuroscience during each semesterof the two years, two semester-long statistics/research design courses, specializedelectives (which are to be chosen in close consultation with the student’sM.S. in Neuroscience 4
  • 5. advisor), and a Master’s thesis (with oral defense). The Program is a spin-offprogram of the existing M.S. Program in Experimental Psychology, and uses theirsuccessful mentorship model. The advantage of the new proposed Program is that itwill allow a greater focus on neuroscience-related courses and give neurosciencestudents more flexibility in choosing electives (see Appendix A for a list ofpotential electives) from other departments, thereby enhancing theinterdisciplinary nature of the Program’s curricula. The Program is designed tomeet these objectives by providing all students with a solid core curriculum, alongwith sufficient flexibility to allow each student to tailor his or her courseworkto meet his or her individual objectives.In terms of learning outcomes, students earning this degree will be able to:Demonstrate a comprehension of neuroscience principles at a graduate-school level; 2. Utilize advanced statistical techniques to analyze research data; 3. Produce written and oral critiques which analyze, synthesize,and integrate information from various perspectives in theneuroscience literature; 4. Formulate hypotheses and craft a research proposal thataddresses an important question in neuroscience in a mannerconsistent with current ethical guidelines; 5. Produce a high-quality thesis and provide an oral defense of it.In summary, the major objective of the proposed M.S. Program in Neuroscience is toprovide students with the requisite academic background, technical skills, andhands-on research experience that will allow them to successfully compete fordoctoral programs in neuroscience or for neuroscience-related jobs in the privateand public sectors. Students in the proposed program will receive a solidtheoretical foundation, as well as attaining high-level technical skills andresearch experience. Students who complete this program will receive excellenttraining for doctoral programs in neuroscience or technical and/or researchpositions in either the private or public sectors, including some jobs in academia,or as researchers in pharmaceutical companies, hospitals and biotechnology firms,including the newly emerging ‘neurotechnology’ industry.M.S. in Neuroscience 5
  • 6. II. New courses to be incorporated in the proposed new program (if any) NSC 501 (Principles of Neuroscience I) NSC 502 (Principles of Neuroscience II) NSC 600 (Special Issues) NSC 690 (Research Seminar in Neuroscience) NSC 696 (Directed Research in Neuroscience) NSC 697 (Independent Study in Neuroscience) NSC 798 (Thesis: Design) NSC 799 (Thesis: Implementation)III. Requested Bulletin copy (Show as requested to appear in the Bulletin.)Masters of Science (M.S.) in Neuroscience: 30 hoursMinimum Totals for Graduation:The Masters of Science (M.S.) in Neuroscience Program at Central MichiganUniversity is designed to give each student a comprehensive understanding ofthe core principles in neuroscience and the requisite training that willprepare students for further, doctoral-level graduate training or for positionsin academics, industry, or government that utilize highly trained researchskills in specific areas of neuroscience. Throughout the program, all studentsare expected to be actively involved in research with a Program faculty member,who serves as a mentor. The focus of the M.S. Program in Neuroscience is tobuild a broad-based and comprehensive understanding of the basic principles ofneuroscience and develop a strong background for applied research in somespecific area of neuroscience. Current areas of specific research traininginclude studying the causes and potential treatments for respiratory disordersand for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases.Admission, Retention, and Termination StandardsApplication Deadline for all Materials: March 1The application deadline for receipt of all materials will be March 1. Whenapplying for the M.S. degree in Neuroscience, applicants must send threeletters of reference, official transcripts, and official GRE scores directly tothe Program Director. Applicants are expected to complete a Bachelor ofScience degree, have at least 15 hours of courses in neuroscience, chemistry,and/or biology (including biologically-based psychology courses), have at least3 hours of statistics, and have a 3.0 grade point average (on a 4.0 scale) togain admittance to the program. Preference will be given to students withprior research experience, especially in the area of neuroscience. Studentswho are deficient in certain subject areas, such as statistics or chemistry,will be expected to make up these deficiencies in addition to the normallyprescribed graduate coursework for the degree. A maximum of 9 credit hoursearned during non-degree status may be applied toward the M.S. degree inNeuroscience.The M.S. degree in Neuroscience is based upon the satisfactory completion of aminimum of 30 semester hours of graduate work, including the successfulcompletion of the Principles of Neuroscience courses and successful completionof a thesis (with oral defense). Students who are unable to pass thecomprehensive examination for the Principles of Neuroscience courses afterthree attempts will be dismissed from the program. Students who complete therequired coursework and successfully defend their thesis will attain the Masterof Science in Neuroscience degree. All other retention and terminationstandards for the program follow University policy as specified in the GraduateBulletin.M.S. in Neuroscience 6
  • 7. Degree RequirementsRequired Courses (24 hours)NSC 501 - Principles of Neuroscience I 4(4-0)NSC 502 - Principles of Neuroscience II 4(4-0)PSY 511 – Statistics in Psychology 3(3-1)PSY 611 – Research Design 3(3-0)NSC 690 – Research Seminar in Neuroscience 1-4(Spec)NSC 798 – Thesis: Design 1-3(Spec)NSC 799 – Thesis: Implementation 1-3(Spec)Note: A minimum of 4 hours of NSC 690 and 6 hours from a combination of NSC 798and NSC 799 is required.Electives (6 hours)To be chosen in consultation with an advisor.Note: Students need a minimum of 2 credit hours from elective courses at the600 level.Total: 30 semester hoursApprovedIII. ITEMS TO THE PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION COMMITTEE - NoneIV. ITEMS TO THE GENERAL EDUCATION SUBCOMMITTEE - NoneV. ITEMS TO THE PLANNING COUNCIL - NoneVI. ABBREVIATED PROCESS - NoneVII. OTHER BUSINESS (1) PSC 150 Course Request change for MCS Review and Addendum was Revised/resubmitted to Gen Ed Committee per their request. (2) PSY 682 Course Request change for MCS Review and Addendum for Distance Delivery was Revised/resubmitted to Graduate Council per their request. (3) ENG 616 New Course Request was Revised/resubmitted to the Graduate Council per their request.Respectfully,Mitch Hall Suzanne SovaCCC Chair Recording SecretaryM.S. in Neuroscience 7