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12production5.ppt 12production5.ppt Presentation Transcript

  • Clinical Application of Frequency and Intensity Variables
    • Frequency Variables
    • Amplitude and Intensity Variables
    • Voice Disorders
    • Neurological Disorders
  • Frequency Variables
    • Average Fo.
    • Fo frequency Variability
    • Maximum Phonational Frequency Range
  • Frequency Variables continued
    • Average Fundamental Frequency
      • Variables
        • Age and Gender
          • Infants (350 to 500 Hz)
          • Ages 3 through 10 (270 to 300 Hz)
          • Adults
            • Males (120 Hz)
            • Females (220 Hz)
        • Individual differences
    View slide
  • Frequency Variables continued
    • Frequency Variability
      • Normal SD is plus/minus 20 to 35 dB
      • Variables that affect variablity
        • Emotions
        • Fatigue
        • Different grammatical constructions
        • Individual differences
        • Age (decreases through lifetime)
        • Neuromuscular or other disorders
      • Frequency variability can be used as a baseline when examining different voice disorders
    View slide
  • Frequency Variables continued
    • Maximum Phonational Frequency Range (MPFR)
    • Differs from Fo which refers to connected speech.
    • MPFR is the range of frequency that you can produce (provide example).
  • Frequency Variables continued
    • Mean MPFR is around 2.5 octaves or 30 semitones.
    • Not a great deal of variability for age and gender.
    • Trained singers have higher MPFR.
    • Poor physical condition regardless of age may signal a problem with the speaker.
  • Amplitude and Intensity Variables
    • Average Amplitude Level
    • Amplitude Variability
    • Dynamic Range
    • Voice Range Profile
  • AmplitudeVariables continued
    • Average Amplitude Level
      • Refers to normal conversational levels
      • Usually around 65 to 80 dB SPL (or 45 to 60 dB HL)
      • No major age or gender effects.
      • May increase in background noise (Lombard effect)
      • Lower amplitude may be a result of a pathology.
  • AmplitudeVariables continued
    • Amplitude Variability
      • Changes in amplitude due to …
        • Speaker’s mood and feeling
        • Message such as stress, duration, syllabic structure, etc.
      • SD is around 10 dB, but varies depending upon level of excitement.
      • Lack of amplitude variation = monotone, and may be difficult to understand.
  • AmplitudeVariables continued
    • Dynamic Range
      • Intensity difference between soft speech and the loudest shout.
      • Normally between (30 and 115 dB SPL)
      • Tends to be greatest for people with a near normal Fo.
      • Trained signers may have greater dynamic range.
  • AmplitudeVariables continued
    • Voice Range Profile
      • AKA VRP, phonetogram or FoSPL profile.
      • Subject sustains a vowel at different Fos, and increases/decreases voice amplitude.
      • Insert page 59.
  • AmplitudeVariables continued
    • Voice Range Profile continued
      • VRP can be used to get an overall picture of amplitude and frequency.
      • Can be used to…
        • Determine normal vocal function
        • Monitor treatment for vocal disorder
  • Voice Disorders
    • Subjective measures
      • Perceptual Scales
    • Objective measures
      • Amplitude
      • Frequency
    • Use in monitoring progress of treatment
    • Objective measures are more sensitive to changes.
  • Neurological Disorders
    • Examples include Parkinson’s Disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), MS, strokes, brain tumors, TBI, etc.
    • Objective measures can be used to track course of disease or treatment.
  • Summary