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Marilyn.gonzalez final presentation
Marilyn.gonzalez final presentation
Marilyn.gonzalez final presentation
Marilyn.gonzalez final presentation
Marilyn.gonzalez final presentation
Marilyn.gonzalez final presentation
Marilyn.gonzalez final presentation
Marilyn.gonzalez final presentation
Marilyn.gonzalez final presentation
Marilyn.gonzalez final presentation
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Marilyn.gonzalez final presentation

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  • 1. The Power of Redemption in The Kite Runner By: Marilyn Gonzalez
  • 2. Introduction • In the novel, The Kite Runner, Hosseini uses the themes redemption, loyalty and betrayal, and coming of age to portray the idea that “the decisions made in the past, reflect who you will become in the future”.
  • 3. Summary • The main character, Amir, lives in a house in Kabul, Afghanistan with his father, Baba, his servant, Ali, and his servants son, Hassan. Amir and Hassan develop a close friendship despite their religion and social class differences and spend most of their time together kite fighting. During a kite tournament, Hassan gets raped by a bully, Assef, and Amir is too afraid to stop it so he runs away.
  • 4. Quotes • "I became what I am today at the age of twelve…" (Page 1). – Amir • "Standing in the kitchen with the receiver to my ear, I knew it wasn't just Rahim Khan on the line. It was my past of unatoned sins" (Page 1). – Amir
  • 5. Redemption • "I opened my mouth, almost said something. Almost. The rest of my life might have turned out differently if I had but I didn't. I just watched. Paralyzed.” - Amir • "I want to tear myself from this place, from this reality, rise up like a cloud and float away, melt into this humid summer night and dissolve somewhere far, over the hills. But I am here, my legs blocks of concrete, my lungs empty of air, my throat burning. There will be no floating away."(Page 301). - Amir
  • 6. Loyalty & Betrayal • "Hassan was the price I had to pay, the lamb I had to slay to win Baba” – Amir • Amir feels some sort of power over Hassan and describes the feeling of power to when they would play insect torture. Hassan represents the ant, which is small and hopeless, and Amir is the one holding the magnifying glass because he feels superior to him.
  • 7. Coming of Age • Rahim Khan calls Amir to tell him Hassan was killed by the Taliban and Hassan’s son, Sohrab, was taken to an orphanage in Kabul. Amir takes advantage of this opportunity to redeem himself and make it up to Hassan for his disloyalty. • Amir goes to Kabul searching for a child and finds the man within himself.
  • 8. Quotes • "I wondered if that was how forgiveness budded; not with the fanfare of epiphany, but with pain gathering its things, packing up and slipping away unannounced in the middle of the night.” - Amir • "Seeking to forget makes exile all the longer; the secret of redemption lies in remembrance.” - Richard Von Weizsaecker
  • 9. Conclusion • The Kite Runner explores many themes that readers can relate to and that’s what makes the characters seem so real. Amir’s guilt and unhappiness is felt within his words. • Erin Collazo Miller wrote a review on The Kite Runner and said, "I was drawn by Amir's voice. I sympathized with him, I cheered for him, and felt angry with him at different points…The characters became real to me…".
  • 10. Sources • Hosseini, Khaled: The Kite Runner. New York: Riverhead Books, 2003. Pri http://thebestnotes.com/booknotes/Kite_Runner/Kite_Runner01.html • http://jaletwin.hubpages.com/hub/Thematic-Ideas-in-The-Kite-Runner • http://bestsellers.about.com/u/r/od/fictionreviews/gr/kite_runner_r.htm

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