Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Theory to Practice Presentation Script
Theory to Practice Presentation Script
Theory to Practice Presentation Script
Theory to Practice Presentation Script
Theory to Practice Presentation Script
Theory to Practice Presentation Script
Theory to Practice Presentation Script
Theory to Practice Presentation Script
Theory to Practice Presentation Script
Theory to Practice Presentation Script
Theory to Practice Presentation Script
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Theory to Practice Presentation Script

723

Published on

Notes from PowerPoint.

Notes from PowerPoint.

Published in: Education, Career
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
723
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. From Theory to Practice & Back in TESOL slide : Script 1 Rebekah: This is Marie Takai. She has an M.A. TESOL from SJSU and is currently teaching three levels of Japanese at Sunnyvale-Cupertino adult education. Marie: This is Rebekah Sidman-Taveau. She taught in my M.A. TESOL program at SJSU and was my practicum teacher last spring. Rebekah’s PhD in Foreign Language Education with a focus on TESL. She is currently ESL Coordinator and Lecturer at San Francisco Art Institute and part time faculty at SJSU. 2 Rebekah: To start, Marie will share some of her innovative and successful lessons. Then we will both talk about specific theoretical connections we see to her practice. Marie managed to engage her beginning class in the collaborative publication of an international recipe book, to have her beginning students give presentations of their recipes and share them with the class. As I witnessed Marie’s lesson and learned about her cook book unit, I saw connections to different theories including: Constructivist/socio-constructivist learning theory Comprehensible Output Hypothesis Multiple Intelligences Motivation Theory and the Affective Filter Hypothesis I will talk about each of these theoretical connections as Marie explains her lessons but first lets here a bit about the transformation Marie went through to be able to implement these lessons. A key point we would like to make today is that it is not a one way trip from reading about theories to consciously implementing them. Theory can be utilized pre-during-post lesson and in conscious and unconscious or even inadvertent ways. Marie’s story is testament to this. 3 Marie Hello, so let me start by telling you a bit about my teaching context. My practicum teaching took place in an Adult School in the South Bay. The class was Beginner High – the third lowest of nine levels. They only knew basic grammar and vocabulary and seldom spoke
  • 2. out in class. The size of the class was about 25 – 30. As other adult school classes, this class was also transient: students came in and went out. It was a multi-ethnic class with students from nine countries – Koreans, Chinese, Taiwanese, Mexicans, Indians & an Iranian, a Peruvian, a Vietnamese, and a Japanese. It was a morning class which included a lot of female home makers especially middle aged Asian women. 4 Marie In this photo, I may look cheerful but, at the beginning of my practicum, I was very nervous. The tremendous pressure felt by a typical student teacher frustrated me. I felt I was not qualified to teach and my self-esteem was very low. In short, I was suffering from classic imposter syndrome. The woman sitting next to me is my mentor teacher. She is an experienced professional teacher. Her students admired her for her great teaching skills and kindness. She was an American and a native English speaker. Yes, she seemed to represent the main stream of the American culture. As an Asian non-native speaker, I felt intimidated by the presence of the perfect ESL teacher. What made me feel worse was that I had been traumatized in my former language learning experiences. Though I had lived in the U.S for five years, my English was nothing but a stumbling awkward production. In Japan, where most of the classes I took where behaviorist based approaches, my English grades were always terrible. The mean teachers corrected every single mistake and I didn’t enjoy learning at all. Having been an unsuccessful learner, how dare I teach English to others?

×