Changes to IDEA 2004 offer alternatives to IQ Discrepancy model  (Atlas)
RTI: Response to Intervention <ul><li>A relatively new process designed to identify students with specific learning disabi...
IQ Discrepancy Model <ul><li>Used for last several decades </li></ul><ul><li>Based upon a discrepancy between student’s IQ...
Problems with IQ Discrepancy Model <ul><li>Tests are not able to identify this discrepancy until later grade levels  (3 rd...
RTI Components <ul><li>Universal screening : All students are given a screening measure. Students at risk for academic fai...
Expected to help ~80-85% of students  be successful Offered to ~15% of students not successful in Tier 1 ~5% of students –...
Practice with RTI <ul><li>From IRIS </li></ul>
So…Why RTI? <ul><li>Greater potential for  early intervening  than IQ Discrepancy model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No “wait to ...
Try It… <ul><li>What are the two options for identifying students with learning disabilities? Briefly summarize each one. ...
Sources <ul><li>The IRIS Center Special Education Resources for Inclusion, Scientifically-Validated and Evidence-Based Ins...
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What is RTI?

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  • There are many models of RTI. This represents the Standard Treatment Protocol and has a great deal of research to support it.
  • What is RTI?

    1. 1. Changes to IDEA 2004 offer alternatives to IQ Discrepancy model (Atlas)
    2. 2. RTI: Response to Intervention <ul><li>A relatively new process designed to identify students with specific learning disabilities </li></ul><ul><li>Included as a possibility (not requirement) in IDEA 2004 </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative to previously used IQ-Discrepancy Model </li></ul>
    3. 3. IQ Discrepancy Model <ul><li>Used for last several decades </li></ul><ul><li>Based upon a discrepancy between student’s IQ as measured by a standardized test and performance in content area tasks (reading or math) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>IQ Discrepancy explained (Atlas) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Problems with IQ Discrepancy Model <ul><li>Tests are not able to identify this discrepancy until later grade levels (3 rd grade or later) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Child has been struggling all along and may have experienced years of frustration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does not discriminate between lack of effective instruction and LD </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does not provide information to guide future instruction (what works; what doesn’t work) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Wait to Fail” process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Explanation of Wait to Fail (Atlas) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does not capture ability outside of IQ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May not effectively identify ELL or Bilingual students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Expert explanation from IRIS </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Most School Districts still use the IQ Discrepancy Model </li></ul><ul><li>The IQ-achievement discrepancy model is an already established practice. </li></ul><ul><li>It is relatively easy to employ. </li></ul><ul><li>A teacher does not have to spend a great amount of time in the identification process because a certified diagnostician or school psychologist conducts the IQ and achievement tests. </li></ul><ul><li>The identification procedure only requires a one-time assessment. </li></ul>
    5. 5. RTI Components <ul><li>Universal screening : All students are given a screening measure. Students at risk for academic failure are identified. </li></ul><ul><li>Tier 1 : Students receive effective instruction in the general education setting, using validated practices. Student progress is monitored on a weekly basis. (In some approaches, universal screening is considered part of Tier 1.) </li></ul><ul><li>Tier 2 : Students whose progress is less than desired receive different or additional support from the classroom teacher or another educational professional. Student progress continues to be monitored. </li></ul><ul><li>Tier 3 : Students whose progress is still insufficient in Tier 2 may receive even more intensive instruction, which can be provided in a variety of ways. Then, depending on a state's or district's policies, students may qualify for special education services based on the progress monitoring data, or they may receive either an abbreviated or comprehensive evaluation for the identification of a learning disability. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Expected to help ~80-85% of students be successful Offered to ~15% of students not successful in Tier 1 ~5% of students – not special ed yet Explanation of RTI process (Atlas) Universal Screening ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION Assessments determine if interventions are successful or if students need more help
    7. 7. Practice with RTI <ul><li>From IRIS </li></ul>
    8. 8. So…Why RTI? <ul><li>Greater potential for early intervening than IQ Discrepancy model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No “wait to fail” long-term struggle for student </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Continued targeted instruction in the classroom before special education i.d. </li></ul><ul><li>Greater potential to prevent false positives resulting from ineffective instruction or test language bias rather than LD </li></ul><ul><li>Uses ongoing classroom data rather than 1 time test (increasingly frequent monitoring) </li></ul><ul><li>Informs classroom practice </li></ul>&quot;Of those with 'specific learning disabilities,' 80 percent are there [in special education] simply because they haven't learned how to read ...The reading difficulties may not be their only area of difficulty, but it is the area that resulted in special education placement.&quot; (President's Commission on Excellence in Special Education, 2002) Credit: IRIS
    9. 9. Try It… <ul><li>What are the two options for identifying students with learning disabilities? Briefly summarize each one. </li></ul><ul><li>List at least four benefits of using an RTI approach with struggling students. </li></ul><ul><li>Compton is a first-grade student at Rosa Parks Elementary School. His teacher, having administered a universal screening measure, has identified Compton as a struggling reader. Name and explain the first step in the RTI approach that she should consider when trying to help Compton. </li></ul><ul><li>Assume that your recommendation for Question 3 was implemented; unfortunately, Compton's progress continues to be insufficient. Name and explain the next step in the RTI approach. </li></ul>From IRIS
    10. 10. Sources <ul><li>The IRIS Center Special Education Resources for Inclusion, Scientifically-Validated and Evidence-Based Instructional Strategies, Peabody College of Education, Vanderbilt University </li></ul><ul><li>The Atlas Initiative for Public Education </li></ul>

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