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Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
Team 6
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Team 6

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  • 1. Team Six – Final Presentation Anna Lei – Parent Annie Tully – Social Worker Cheryl Kondreck – General Education Teacher Elizabeth Cramarosso – Special Education Teacher Caitlin Gallagher – Speech Pathologist
  • 2. Demographics School Community • 12% Students with disabilities • 92% Latino • 99% Low income • 21% English Language Learners • 2% Homeless • 29% Chronic truancy • Average class size, 27 Students • 44% in the community have no high school diploma • 13% unemployed • Poverty rate is 27%, higher than Chicago’s 20% • The average household in the neighborhood earns only 63% of the household income earned in the rest of Chicago.
  • 3. ISAT Assessments of the School • 36% Meet/Exceed in Reading • 39% Meet/Exceed in Math • 63% Meet/Exceed in Science
  • 4. Special Education – Key Beliefs It is our school’s mission to deliver special education for our students with disabilities and to implement best practices in that delivery. 1. Zero reject 2. Non-discriminatory evaluation 3. Free, appropriate public education (FAPE): ▫ IEP is based on the student’s evaluation and is outcome- oriented 4. Least restrictive environment (LRE) ▫ Placement of student considers inclusion, but above all must provide services and a setting that benefits the individual student according to their IEP
  • 5. Special Education – Key Beliefs (cont.) How we implement: 5. Parent and student participation (family rights) 6. Procedural due process: ▫ makes parents and school accountable in carrying out the student’s IDEA rights
  • 6. Inclusion What is inclusion? • Inclusion pairs the general education teacher with a special education teacher together to include and integrate special education students in a general education classroom through accommodations and modifications. How does successful inclusion look like? • Collaboration between general and special education teacher • Differentiating and modifying teaching methods to accommodate all students and different learners What are the benefits of inclusion? • Opportunities for social interaction • Peer modeling • Increased staff collaboration
  • 7. General Recommendations to Support Inclusion • Inclusion (also known as Least Restrictive Environment): students with disabilities should participate in the school’s academic, extracurricular, and other activities with students without disabilities. • Mainstreaming • Regular education initiative • Inclusion through accommodations • Inclusion through restructuring
  • 8. General Recommendations (cont.) • Supplemental Aids and Services: (Turnbull et al., 2013, pp. 33 - 34) • Universal design for learning: digital talking book, advance organizers • Access: Wide doors, clear aisles, curb cuts • Classroom Ecology: seating arrangement, lighting, acoustics • Assistive Technology: Calculator, augmentative communication device • Assessment Modifications: extended time, scribe, oral presentation • Teacher and paraprofessional or peer support: peer buddy, teacher
  • 9. Emotional or Behavioral Disorder: An Overview ▫ A condition that is accompanied by one or more of the following for a substantial period of time:  An inability to learn that cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors  An inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers  Inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal circumstances  A general, pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression  A tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems
  • 10. Emotional/Behavioral Disorder Social and Behavioral Recommendations for both School and Home • Functional behavioral assessment (FBA) to identify behaviors and triggers • Positive behavior supports integrated into the IEP • Computer-based instruction for self- regulating behavior (KidsTool) • Modeling at a young age • Conflict resolution/management
  • 11. Emotional/Behavioral Disability General education and special education recommendations General Education Special Education • Class wide peer tutoring (CWPT) • Positive Behavior Support (PBS) with goal setting • Service Learning • Implement peer-mediated instruction to enable peers to help the student with EBD self-regulate her behavior • Service learning activities • The Good Behavior Game
  • 12. Behavioral/Emotional Disability Speech Therapy Recommendations • Specific Recommendations: • Wrap Around • Multimodal learning • Zero in on fundamental skills WRAP AROUND MULTI MODAL ZERO IN
  • 13. Intellectual Disabilities: An Overview IDEA defines intellectual disabilities as, “significantly subaverage general intellectual functioning, existing concurrently with deficits in adaptive behavior and manifested during the developmental period that adversely affects a child’s education performance" (Turnbull et. al., 2013, p. 196). Assessment: 1. Intellectual function: IQ < 70 2. Adaptive behavior skills: how students demonstrate concepts, social, & practical skills Characteristics: 1. Compromised memory function (short-term and working) 2. Difficulty making generalizations 3. Lack of self motivation 4. Significant limitations on adaptive behaviors: ▫ Conceptual skills ▫ Social skills ▫ Practical skills
  • 14. Intellectual Disability Social and Behavioral Recommendations for both School and Home: • Focus on adaptive behavior—conceptual, social and practical skills ▫ Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale assessment results • Supports for adaptive behavior skills: ▫ Self-determined learning ▫ Peer tutoring • Age-appropriate transition assessment before entering high school • Interagency collaboration: work with community organizations and agencies, network with staff, plan for support to transition from middle school to high school and beyond • At home, family should be informed about goals and outcomes of child’s IEP; work together with IEP members • Family should assume an active role in child’s life to offer support and motivation
  • 15. Intellectual Disability Special Education and General Education Recommendations General Education Special Education • Concentration on applied/functional skills • Self-determined learning model of instruction - what is my goal? what have I learned? What is my plan? • Supplementary aides and services - paraprofessionals, e- readers, visual aides • Strategies for inclusion • e.g refrain from excluding the learner with an ID from a challenging activity • Instead, incorporate motivational strategies into the task at hand • UDL strategies like DVDs, book summaries, and graphics
  • 16. Intellectual Disability Speech Therapy Recommendations • Digital talking books • Master functional skills • Paraeducators
  • 17. Hearing Impairment: An Overview • Hearing loss is a gradated phenomena • Can be unilateral (in one ear) or bilateral (in both ears) • Hearing loss ≥ 70 – 90 decibels = “Deaf” classification • Hearing loss = 20 – 70 decibels = “hard of hearing” classification • Hearing loss can be congenital (present at birth) though this is less common than an acquired hearing impairment • 1.2% of those served under IDEA have hearing loss • The Deaf Community – a particular and beloved linguistic culture, not an impairment • Cochlear implants - damaging or beneficial?
  • 18. Hearing Impairment Social and Behavioral Recommendations for the home • Careful consideration of least restrictive environment: inclusive vs. segregated education settings • Multiculturalism and diversity: alternatives to oral- auditory instructional strategies in ELL • Deaf culture: promote awareness, encourage involvement • Direct instruction & coaching in peer interaction and social skills, such as: ▫ Educating hearing students about deaf life and culture ▫ Promoting small group interaction in a general education setting • Access to language rich environment with a variety of communication modes • Real world or authentic experiences that align with academics
  • 19. Hearing Impairment General Education and Special Education Recommendations General Education Special Education  Supplementary aides and services – sound-field amplification system, educational interpreters, CART  Concentration on language and speech  Cummins Model  Focus on language relatable to personal experiences • Utilize the services of an educational interpreter • Integrate vocabulary development • Teaching about the Deaf Community
  • 20. Hearing Impairment Speech Therapy Recommendations • Interpreting services • IEP communication needs • Use of assistive technology
  • 21. Conclusion and Key Points • Collaboration & Communication • Cultural Component • Assessment and Re-evaluation: ▫ Minimum of quarterly ▫ Evaluate with the team what is working and what is not • Yearly professional development
  • 22. References Dupuis, Bonnie; Barclay, Joyce W.; Holmes, Sherwin D.; Platt, Morgan; Shaha, Steven H.; Lewis, Valerie K. (Summer 2006). “Does Inclusion Help Students: Perspectives from Regular Education and Students with Disabilities.” Journal of the American Academy of Special Education Professionals (JAASEP). Retrieved from http://aasep.org/aasep-publications/journal-of-the-american-academy- of-special-education-professionals-jaasep/jaasep-summer-2006/does- inclusion-help-students-perspectives-from-regular-education-and-students- with-disabilities/index.html Ellis, Josh. (2009, March 17). Demographics. Retrieved from http://www.metroplanning.org/uploads/cms/documents/olympicspilsendemog raphics.pdf Illinois State Board of Education. (2013, January 24). Illinois State Board of Education Raises ISAT Levels. Retrieved from http://www.isbe.net/news/2013/jan24a.htm
  • 23. References (cont.) Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center. (2008). About American Deaf Culture. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/clerc_center/information_and_resources/info_to_g o/educate_children_(3_to_21)/resources_for_mainstream_programs/effective _inclusion/including_deaf_culture/about_american_deaf_culture.html Luckner, John L.; Slike, Samuel B.; Johnson, Harold. (2012). “Helping students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing Succeed.” TEACHING Exceptional Children, Vol. 44, No. 4, pp. 58-67. Retrieved from https://uic.blackboard.com/bbcswebdav/pid-3719812-dt-content-rid- 46342925_2/courses/2014.summer.sped.410.1/Deaf%20or%20Hard%20at%20 Hearing.pdf Ocali Lifespan Transition Centers. (2014.) Transition to Adulthood: Guidelines for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (2nd ed.). Retrieved from http://www.ocali.org/up_doc/TG12_AATA.pdf Turnbull, A., Turnbull, R., Wehmeyer, M.L., & Shogren, K.A. (2013). Exceptional lives: Special education in today’s schools (7th ed.). Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.

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