Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Team 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Team 1

211

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
211
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • these are just off the top of my head by the way
  • Torrenno, S., & Gromisch, E. (2002, June 6). A Guide to Inclusion & Teaching Students with Physical Disabilities. Bright Hub Education. Retrieved June 11, 2014, from http://www.brighthubeducation.com/special-ed-physical-disabilities/124486-inclusion-and-teaching-students-with-physical-disabilities/?cid=parsely_rec
  • Complete/narrate slides : Anthony

    We have decided as a Multidisciplinary Team that it is important to have an In-Service Day before the school year starts to address professional development for the teachers. The day is meant to address the following areas that need to be strengthened:


    Below is the In-Service Day schedule of events

    09:00-10:00 A.M. - Assistive technologies (presented by Technology Teacher)
    10:00-11:00 A.M. - Creation of social classes with curriculum (presented by Social Worker)
    11:00-12:00 P.M. - Curriculum planning – Classwide peer tutoring and co-teaching (presented by Special Ed Teacher)
    LUNCH
    1:00-1:30 P.M. - Discuss physical disabilities and submit floor plan changes (presented by Occupational Therapist and School Nurse)
    1:30-2:30 P.M. - SWPBS, RTI and Autism inclusion (presented by School Psychologist)
    2:30-3:00 P.M. - School Nurse available for resources on medical issues of specific students
    3:00-3:45 P.M. - Speech and language presentation on treatments and consultation services, group speech and language intervention, and distribution of sign language videos (presented by Speech Pathologist)

    **This schedule can be changed for the second half of the year based on teaching staff feedback**
  • Complete/narrate slides : Anthony

    In addition, we will be having scheduled monthly meetings between special education teachers and the general education teachers for each grade level. These meetings will address classroom wide concerns so that comparisons can be made on what is working in each classroom and where improvement is needed.

    The reason we chose not to meet on any Mondays is because many national holidays fall on Monday.

    We will instead meet the
    1st Tuesday of each month - 8:00-8:50 A.M. – This meeting will be for kindergarten, 3rd grade and 6th grade teachers
    1st Wednesday of each month - 8:00-8:50 A.M. – This meeting will be for the 1st and 4th grade teachers
    1st Thursday of each month - 8:00-8:50 A.M. – This meeting will be for the 2nd and 5th grade teachers

    **We can increase or decrease the frequency of these meetings based on teaching staff feedback**
  • Transcript

    • 1. Enhancing Access to General Education for Students with Special Needs Sloane Merdinger - Special Education Teacher Brigid Walsh - General Education Teacher Sarah Warda - School Counselor Wenhua Deng - Speech Pathologist Anthony Valsamis - Parent
    • 2. Outline ● School information ● Special Education ● Inclusion ● General recommendations ● Specific recommendations o Speech and language disability o Autism o Physical disability ● Conclusion
    • 3. School Information Student profile (2012 - 2013) ● Demographics o Total enrollment - 458 students o Low-income - 96% o English learners - 1% o Students with disabilities - 18% o Homeless - 11% ● Race o Black/African American - 94% o Hispanic/Latino - 3% o White - 1% o Two or more races - 2% (http://illinoisreportcard.com)
    • 4. School Information School Performance (2012-2013) ● Academic Growth (0-200) o Reading - 102 o Math - 101 ● ISAT scores (% students who meet or exceed standards) o Reading - 25% o Mathematics - 34% o Overall - 29% o Science - 56% Learning Conditions (2012-2013) ● Student mobility - 34% ● Chronic truancy rate - 40% ● Student attendance - 92% ● Average class size - 24 students ● Total school days - 181 (http://illinoisreportcard.com)
    • 5. What is Special Education? Special education is individualized instruction, including related services and supplementary aids, at no cost to a child’s parents, that meets a child’s unique academic needs (Turnbull et al., 2012) IDEA states six principles that govern a student’s education: 1. Zero reject: a rule against excluding any student. 2. Nondiscriminatory evaluation: a rule requiring schools to evaluate students fairly to determine if they have a disability 3. Appropriate education: a rule requiring schools to provide individually tailored education for each (Turnbull et al., 2007)
    • 6. What is Special Education? 4. Least restrictive environment: a rule requiring schools to educate students with disabilities alongside students without disabilities to the maximum extent appropriate for the students with disabilities. 5. Procedural due process: a rule providing safeguards for students against schools’ actions, including a right to sue schools in court. 6. Parental and student participation: a rule requiring schools to collaborate with parents and adolescent students in designing and carrying out special education programs. (http://idea.ed.gov)
    • 7. Inclusion ● Students with disabilities be educated with their non-disabled peers ● Students removed only when the nature or severity of the disability, even with support, inhibits academic achievement ● Four consecutive phases of inclusion: ○ Mainstreaming ○ Regular Education Initiative ○ Inclusion through accommodations ○ Inclusion through restructuring (Turnbull et al., 2012, pg. 38)
    • 8. Inclusion Characteristics: ● Home-School Placement ● Principle of Natural Proportions ● Restructuring Teaching and Learning ● Age- and Grade-Appropriate Placements (Turnbull et al., 2012, pg. 39)
    • 9. Inclusion Benefits of inclusion with supports: ● Increased communication and social skills (Jackson et al., 2009) ● Greater progress in math and reading (Cole et al., 2004) ● Promotes universal design for learning ● Support in intended for students with disabilities helpful for all students
    • 10. General strategies for enhancing inclusion Classwide Peer Tutoring (CWPT) ● Dyads: student with disability + same-aged peer ● 7 operational components o Multimodal learning o Reciprocal and distributed practice o Immediate error correction and feedback o Games and competing teams Co-teaching: general and special education teacher working together ● An essential element of including students in the general education classroom ● Six methods o One teach, one observe o One teach, one assist o Parallel teaching (Turnbull et al., 2012) o Built-in reinforcement o High-mastery levels o Measured outcome o Station teaching o Alternative teaching o Team teaching
    • 11. General strategies for enhancing academic achievement Response to Intervention (RTI) ● According to the Center on Response to Intervention, RTI “integrates assessment and intervention within a multi‐level prevention system to maximize student achievement and reduce behavior problems.” ● The RTI framework consists of 4 components. Schools use data throughout the RTI process for: o Screening - identify students at risk for poor learning outcome o Progress monitoring - monitor student progress o Multi-level or multi-tier prevention system - provide evidence‐based interventions o Data-based decision making - adjust the intensity and nature of those interventions depending on a student’s responsiveness and identify students with learning disabilities or other disabilities (Essential Components of RTI)
    • 12. General strategies for enhancing social skills Schoolwide positive behavior support (SWPBS) ● SWPBS is “a systems-level and evidence-based method for improving valued social and learning outcomes for all students.” ● The 3 levels of SWPBS include: o Universal support  Creating a positive learning context for all students  Setting clear and specific expectations for student behavior  Positively rewarding students for demonstrating expected behaviors o Group support  Addressing problem behavior that is occurring with groups of students who are not responding to universal support  This may occur in areas of school where there are higher rates of problem behaviors o Individualized support  Addressing problem behavior that is occurring with individual students who are not responding to universal support and group support (Turnbull et al., 2012, p. 256)
    • 13. Speech & Language Delay - Causes & Effects ● Developmental speech and language disorder ○ Trouble producing speech sounds, using spoken language to communicate, or understanding what other people say ○ Affect communication,expression,reading,written language,etc ● Other Causes ○ Hearing Loss ○ Intellectual disability - common cause of delay ○ Neurological problems - e.g.,Cerebral Palsy, TBI ○ Autism – affects communication ○ Structural problems - e.g., cleft lip or cleft palate
    • 14. Services for Students with S&L Disabilities •Screening & Evaluation •Treatments & Consultation Services •Directive speech-language therapy sessions •Individual therapy or group therapy •Sign language •Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) •Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ACC) •Collaboration with teachers, parents, and other service providers in meeting the needs of children not requiring direct intervention. •Progress Monitoring
    • 15. Academic Strategies for Speech & Language Disabilities Group Speech & Language Intervention ● Beneficial for them to interact with other students ● Allows for introduction of a greater range of vocabulary words Individual Speech & Language Therapy ● Tailored according to child’s age, communication problems types, severity, family's willingness, and ability of involvement ● Allows formulating specific strategies around achievable goals. Directive Speech-Language Intervention ● Therapist model and prompt desired S&L behavior
    • 16. Social Strategies for Speech & Language Disabilities Naturalistic Speech-Language Intervention ● Create opportunities to use speech and language in the pattern of natural language acquisition ● Most effective in children’ spontaneous language production ● Helpful to learn skills: turn-taking, social interact with others. Family-Centered Approach & Parent Training Program ● Effective in improving the child's language and also at changing the parents’ speech patterns ● Build self confidence in their ability to speak, understand and express ideas in daily life
    • 17. What is Autism? Autism is a developmental disability that manifests by the age of three, and that affects children in three main areas: 1. verbal and nonverbal communication 2. social interaction 3. educational performance 3 characteristic behaviors: -repetitive behaviors -resist environmental change or changes in daily routines -display unusual responses to sensory experiences Autism is a spectrum disorder -Severity is based on 1. social communication and 2. restricted, repetitive behaviors -Asperger syndrome (ASD): -significant challenges in social functioning -no significant delays in language development or intellectual functioning
    • 18. Academic strategies for students with Autism Addressing communication needs: --assistive technologies ACC devices, TouchChat app Addressing academic needs: -Provide structure and consistency (students prize routine) -detailed instructions -visual schedules, storyboard, visual aides -independent learning strategies,: mnemonic devices -Discrete trial teaching -extended time, accommodations: having a reader, testing in a separate location -
    • 19. Social strategies for students with Autism Addressing Social Skills -Hidden Curriculum -Social stories -practice skills, then try them in situational experiences -socials –interpersonal skills development programs –group support –individual support -Strengths-based approach and person-centered approach Addressing problem behaviors -Functional behavioral assessment (FBA) -Positive behavior support (PBS) -Group support -define, teach, and practice behavioral expectations -acknowledge appropriate behaviors Other advice: use visual schedules, to reduce off task time and arrange classroom so that students with autism are see and hear well
    • 20. What are physical disabilities? ● IDEA refers to them as orthopedic impairments ○ C.F.R. Sec 300.8 states: “Orthopedic impairment means a severe orthopedic impairment that adversely affects a child’s educational performance. The term includes impairments caused by congential anomaly… impairments cause by disease… and impairments from other causes…” ○ neuromotor impairments, degenerative diseases, musculoskeletal disorders ● Special educators use it broadly to also include students with traumatic brain injury and students with severe and multiple disabilities ● Examples: ○ Cerebral Palsy (Spastic, Dyskinetic, Athetoid, Ataxic, and Mixed) ○ Spina Bifida (Spina Bifida occulta, Myelomeningocele, and Meningocele) ○ Epilepsy (General/Partial seizures) ○ C.F.R. Sec 300.9: Other health impairments ■ anything limiting “strength, vitality, or alertness” due to chronic or acute health problems (Asthma, Leukemia, Sickle Cell Anemia, etc.) ● Determined through Non-Discriminatory Evaluation Process (Turnbull, Turnbull, Wehmeyer, & Shogren, 2013, p. 276): ○ Doctor, parent, and/or teacher evaluations → medical tests → referral of educational assessment → Nondiscriminatory evaluation, procedures, and standards (medical history, IQ test, behavior rating scales, direct observation, curriculum-based assessment) → Determination
    • 21. Academic strategies for students with physical disabilities ● Use Effective Instructional Strategies: o Explicit Instruction o Errorless learning o Positive reinforcement (token economy system) o Transition to adulthood (driver’s education) o Extra time for completion of exams and assigned work o Guidance notes o Mnemonic strategies o Spatial organizers o Scribe & Personal Note Taker o Peer Mediation/ Buddy System ● Classroom set up o accomodate for wheelchairs, larger table, sitting student near entrance, toileting systems ● Assistive Technology o adaptive switches, laptops (keep all school work and lectures accessible), iPads, voice recorders, text to speech, computer assisted instruction
    • 22. Adaptive Physical Education for Students with Physical Disabilities ● Benefits of developing: o physical and motor skills, cardiovascular health, flexibility, greater self control, increase in agility and strength o social skills with peers (team sports/activities) ● Consider instruction, rules, equipment, and environment (Torreno, 2012) ● Modifying Sports with Adaptive Equipment (Torreno, 2012) o Swimming, liife jackets, pool noodles, arm bands o Table tennis, use a large racket o Basketball, can travel with ball in their laps ● Professionals to aid in physical health of student & assist the P.E. educator o Physical Therapist o Instructional Assistant o Paraprofessional
    • 23. Social strategies for students with physical disabilities ● Promote healthy self-awareness ● Advocate the acceptance of physical disabilities to students in general education curriculum ● Assistive Technology- use for chatting/communicating with their peers and families ● Social Events o Formal & Informal Gatherings (with students in general education curriculum and special education curriculum, ex. prom/school dance) o Participation in Sports and Gaming Events (have coach trained to work with the student) o Extracurricular Activities- student can pursue their interests and talents o Regular meetings with other students with physical disabilities  gives them an opportunity to relate to each other and not feel alone  a student with a physical disability can serve as an inspirational model to others
    • 24. Conclusion: Schedule for Planning and Professional Development We have decided as a Multidisciplinary Team that it is important to have an In-Service Day before the school year starts to address professional development for the teachers. The day is meant to address the following areas that need to be strengthened: 09:00-10:00 A.M. - Assistive technologies (presented by Technology Teacher) 10:00-11:00 A.M. - Creation of social classes with curriculum (presented by Social Worker) 11:00-12:00 P.M. - Curriculum planning – Classwide peer tutoring and co-teaching (presented by Special Ed Teacher) LUNCH 1:00-1:30 P.M. - Discuss physical disabilities and submit floor plan changes (presented by Occupational Therapist and School Nurse) 1:30-2:30 P.M. - SWPBS, RTI and Autism inclusion (presented by School Psychologist) 2:30-3:00 P.M. - School Nurse available for resources on medical issues of specific students 3:00-3:45 P.M. - Speech and language presentation on treatments and consultation services, group speech and language intervention, and distribution of sign language videos (presented by Speech Pathologist) **We can alter this schedule for the second half of the year based on teaching staff feedback**
    • 25. Conclusion: Schedule for Implementation and Monitoring of Plans In addition, we will be having scheduled monthly meetings between special education teachers and the general education teachers for each grade level. These meetings will address classroom wide concerns so that comparisons can be made on what is working in each classroom and where improvement is needed. 1st Tuesday of each month - 8:00-8:50 A.M. – Grade K, 3, 6 1st Wednesday of each month - 8:00-8:50 A.M. – Grades 1, 4 1st Thursday of each month - 8:00-8:50 A.M. – Grades 2, 5 **We can increase or decrease the frequency of these meetings based on teaching staff feedback**
    • 26. References: 1. Cole, C. M., Waldron, N., & Majd, M. (2004). Academic progress of students across inclusive and traditional settings. Mental Retardation, 42(2), 136–144. 1. "Education" Title 34 Code of Federal Regulations, Pt. 300. 2002 ed. 1. Jackson, L., Ryndak, D., & Wehmeyer, M. (2009). The dynamic relationship between context, curriculum, and student learning: A case for inclusive education as a research-based practice. Research and Practice in Severe Disabilities, 34(1), 175–195. 1. Torrenno, S., & Gromisch, E. (2002, June 6). A Guide to Inclusion & Teaching Students with Physical Disabilities. Bright Hub Education. Retrieved June 11, 2014, from http://www.brighthubeducation.com/special-ed-physical-disabilities/124486- inclusion-and-teaching-students-with-physical-disabilities/?cid=parsely_rec 1. Turnbull, Ann; Turnbull, H. Rutherford; Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Shogren, Karrie A. (2012-02-08). Exceptional Lives: Special Education in Today's Schools (7th Edition). Pearson HE, Inc.. 1. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Late Blooming or Language Problem? Available at: http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/LateBlooming.htm. Accessed 13 June, 2014 2. Center on Response to Intervention at American Institutes for Research. Essential Components of RTI. Available at: http://www.rti4success.org/essential-components-rti. Accessed 12 June, 2014 3. Understanding Austism: A Guide for Secondary School Teachers. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yAAOI6JUsM#t=100 Accessed 12 June, 2014

    ×