Social Media in Ministry and The Marketplace

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Seminar by Marie Page of Musicademy on the use of social media in ministry and the marketplace.
For more information and to download Marie's 90 page e-book on Facebook Marketing go to http://www.musicademy.com/store/uk/smarter-facebook-marketing-guide.html

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  • Social Media In Ministry & The Marketplace Join Marie, social media lecturer at one of England’s most prestigious universities. Take in this highly practical master class, packed full of ideas and information! Improve the design, content, navigation and findability of your website. Understand how blogging, e-newsletters, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter can help you retain visitors to your site. Dig deep into Google Analytics and search engine optimization. All information is suitable for church, commercial or personal websites. www.musicademy.co.uk © Musicademy 2007
  • Social Media In Ministry & The Marketplace Join Marie, social media lecturer at one of England’s most prestigious universities. Take in this highly practical master class, packed full of ideas and information! Improve the design, content, navigation and findability of your website. Understand how blogging, e-newsletters, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter can help you retain visitors to your site. Dig deep into Google Analytics and search engine optimization. All information is suitable for church, commercial or personal websites. www.musicademy.co.uk © Musicademy 2007
  • Think like a publisher not an advertiser: create content that people will want to consume and share not “ Successful publishing is all about the reader. . .your customers. If you are not solving their pain points with relevant and compelling content, you are adding to the noise, the clutter.” Pulizzi Not interruptive marketing that sends messages that you want to TELL them rather than engage with them Create exceptional content that people will want to share
  • www.musicademy.co.uk © Musicademy 2007
  • Learning how users interact with your website and using that knowledge to make improvements is key to building an effective online business. Google Analytics helps answer difficult questions such as: Why and at what points are visitors abandoning your shopping cart? Is your website design driving people away? Which marketing initiatives are the most effective for your site? Where are your site visitors coming from? What do people do while visiting your site? What keywords do people use to find your site? Google Analytics reports give you thorough, easy-to-understand visual reports that: Track e-commerce metrics such as revenue, conversion rates and ROI Define variables about users as segments and analyze the behavior of each segment Help you understand how visitors navigate throughout your website One example report is the Traffic Sources Overview report. For a selected date range, it shows: An overview of the different kinds of traffic to your website The percentage of Direct Traffic vs Search Engine Traffic Top Traffic Sources Top Keywords driving traffic
  • With Google Analytics reports, you can determine which marketing efforts are driving the most valuable traffic to your site and see how visitors navigate through your site. Track the marketing initiative performance for your AdWords campaigns, email campaigns, search engine referrals, and even offline advertising. There are five report categories Visitors Traffic Sources Content Goals Ecommerce Visitors Section The reports in the Visitors section focus on how many visits your site received from different segments of visitors. For example, you can see how many visits you received from each country (Map Overlay). You can see how many visits you received from people whose previous visit to your site was 3 days ago (Recency, under Visitor Loyalty). The Visitors section is the only section in Google Analytics where you can find the number of people who came to your site. (See Absolute Unique Visitors in the Overview report or in the Absolute Unique Visitors report, under Visitor Trending.) Visits tells you the total number of visits your site received. So, if four people visited your site 10 times each during the active time period, Google Analytics will show that your site received 40 Visits from four Absolute Unique Visitors. The Visitors section also contains four Visitor Loyalty reports: Loyalty , Recency , Length of Visit , and Depth of Visit . Instead of simply stating averages, these reports show the range of visitor interaction on your site. For example, the Visitor Loyalty report shows how many 1st-time, 2nd-time, 3rd-time, etc. visits your site received . Many of the reports in the Visitors section allow you to compare the overall quality of traffic from different segments of visitors. For example, you can compare visitors from different geographic areas based on their site usage, conversion behavior, and ecommerce profitability (Map Overlay). The following reports in the Visitors section allow you to make these kinds of comparisons: Map Overlay , New vs. Returning, Languages , the Browser Capabilities reports, the Network Properties reports, and User Defined . Traffic Sources Section The reports in the Traffic Sources section focus on comparing the quality of traffic you receive from different referrals, search engines, keywords, ads, and marketing campaigns. Most of the reports in this section have site usage , conversion behavior , and ecommerce profitability metrics to compare traffic from different sources. Direct Traffic focuses specifically on visits from people who clicked a bookmark to come to your site or typed your site URL into their browser. The Referring Sites and Search Engines reports allow you to compare traffic from sites and search engines respectively and drill down on each site and search engine to compare URLs or keywords from that site or search engine. The All Traffic Sources report allows you to compare all traffic across all the sources that send traffic to your site. For example, you can see how paid traffic compares to unpaid traffic or how traffic from Google compares to traffic from another web site.   The Keywords report allows you to compare the effectiveness of keywords across all search engines either with or without regard to whether they are paid or organic (unpaid) keywords. The AdWords reports focus exclusively on AdWords traffic. To compare the effectiveness of AdWords campaigns and ads, use the Campaigns and Ad Versions reports. These reports will also include any non-AdWords campaigns and ads that you have tagged with campaign variables.   Content Section Content reports can help you understand how effectively your site engages visitors. The Top Content , Content by Title , and Content Drilldown reports allow you to see which pages on your site were most popular (and therefore, most important), how much time people spent on each page, how frequently people exited your site from each page, and how valuable each page was to your business. The Navigation Analysis reports (accessible from the Content Overview report) allow you to see how visitors navigate through your site. You can use this information to determine whether visitors are easily able to find what they are looking for or if they are getting confused and leaving your site. You can also use the Site Overlay to view click, conversion, and ecommerce information overlaid on each link on your site. The Landing Page Optimization reports (also accessible from the Content Overview report) can help you tailor landing pages for your ads and referrals. If visitors don't see information on landing pages that addresses their reasons for visiting your site, they will simply leave without purchasing anything or converting to your goals. You can also use the Top Landing Pages report to monitor the overall effectiveness of your landing pages, while the Top Exit Pages report displays the pages from which visitors left your site. If there are pages on this report that you don't consider to be logical exit points, you might try to understand why visitors leave from these pages. Consider how you might change the pages or redesign portions of the site so that fewer visitors leave unexpectedly. Goals Section The information in the Goals reports can help you understand how visitors arrive, or don't arrive at your goals. For example, the Funnel Visualization report shows you the points at which visitors progress through or abandon the conversion steps (for example, shopping cart checkout process) you have defined. Tracking these pages reveals how efficiently your site directs visitors to your goal. If any of the funnel pages are overly complicated or hard to navigate, they'll show signs of significant visitor drop-off and lower conversion rates. This information helps you concentrate on improving the pages with the poorest performance for funneling users toward your site goal. In addition to tracking the funnels you have defined, you can also use the Reverse Goal Path to see if visitors are converting via other click paths. Ecommerce Section In addition to the Ecommerce metrics (available wherever you see the Ecommerce tab on reports), there is also an Ecommerce section that focuses exclusively on ecommerce activity. Please note that no data will appear in these reports (or on the Ecommerce tab in the reports in other sections) unless you have enabled ecommerce reporting. These reports show revenue (the value of purchases), conversion rate (the percentage of visits that resulted in a purchase), transactions (the number of purchase orders) and Average Order Value (the average revenue from each purchase). The Product Performance reports (Product Overview, Product SKUs, Categories) show you how many different products generate your revenue and you can click on any product name, SKU, or category to view detailed information for that item. The Transactions report lists of all transactions on your site and is useful for seeing all the ecommerce transactions that are being used to calculate ecommerce metrics. The Visits to Purchase and Time to Purchase reports help you understand your sales cycle by showing you how long it takes for visitors to purchase.
  • With Google Analytics reports, you can determine which marketing efforts are driving the most valuable traffic to your site and see how visitors navigate through your site. Track the marketing initiative performance for your AdWords campaigns, email campaigns, search engine referrals, and even offline advertising. There are five report categories Visitors Traffic Sources Content Goals Ecommerce Visitors Section The reports in the Visitors section focus on how many visits your site received from different segments of visitors. For example, you can see how many visits you received from each country (Map Overlay). You can see how many visits you received from people whose previous visit to your site was 3 days ago (Recency, under Visitor Loyalty). The Visitors section is the only section in Google Analytics where you can find the number of people who came to your site. (See Absolute Unique Visitors in the Overview report or in the Absolute Unique Visitors report, under Visitor Trending.) Visits tells you the total number of visits your site received. So, if four people visited your site 10 times each during the active time period, Google Analytics will show that your site received 40 Visits from four Absolute Unique Visitors. The Visitors section also contains four Visitor Loyalty reports: Loyalty , Recency , Length of Visit , and Depth of Visit . Instead of simply stating averages, these reports show the range of visitor interaction on your site. For example, the Visitor Loyalty report shows how many 1st-time, 2nd-time, 3rd-time, etc. visits your site received . Many of the reports in the Visitors section allow you to compare the overall quality of traffic from different segments of visitors. For example, you can compare visitors from different geographic areas based on their site usage, conversion behavior, and ecommerce profitability (Map Overlay). The following reports in the Visitors section allow you to make these kinds of comparisons: Map Overlay , New vs. Returning, Languages , the Browser Capabilities reports, the Network Properties reports, and User Defined . Traffic Sources Section The reports in the Traffic Sources section focus on comparing the quality of traffic you receive from different referrals, search engines, keywords, ads, and marketing campaigns. Most of the reports in this section have site usage , conversion behavior , and ecommerce profitability metrics to compare traffic from different sources. Direct Traffic focuses specifically on visits from people who clicked a bookmark to come to your site or typed your site URL into their browser. The Referring Sites and Search Engines reports allow you to compare traffic from sites and search engines respectively and drill down on each site and search engine to compare URLs or keywords from that site or search engine. The All Traffic Sources report allows you to compare all traffic across all the sources that send traffic to your site. For example, you can see how paid traffic compares to unpaid traffic or how traffic from Google compares to traffic from another web site.   The Keywords report allows you to compare the effectiveness of keywords across all search engines either with or without regard to whether they are paid or organic (unpaid) keywords. The AdWords reports focus exclusively on AdWords traffic. To compare the effectiveness of AdWords campaigns and ads, use the Campaigns and Ad Versions reports. These reports will also include any non-AdWords campaigns and ads that you have tagged with campaign variables.   Content Section Content reports can help you understand how effectively your site engages visitors. The Top Content , Content by Title , and Content Drilldown reports allow you to see which pages on your site were most popular (and therefore, most important), how much time people spent on each page, how frequently people exited your site from each page, and how valuable each page was to your business. The Navigation Analysis reports (accessible from the Content Overview report) allow you to see how visitors navigate through your site. You can use this information to determine whether visitors are easily able to find what they are looking for or if they are getting confused and leaving your site. You can also use the Site Overlay to view click, conversion, and ecommerce information overlaid on each link on your site. The Landing Page Optimization reports (also accessible from the Content Overview report) can help you tailor landing pages for your ads and referrals. If visitors don't see information on landing pages that addresses their reasons for visiting your site, they will simply leave without purchasing anything or converting to your goals. You can also use the Top Landing Pages report to monitor the overall effectiveness of your landing pages, while the Top Exit Pages report displays the pages from which visitors left your site. If there are pages on this report that you don't consider to be logical exit points, you might try to understand why visitors leave from these pages. Consider how you might change the pages or redesign portions of the site so that fewer visitors leave unexpectedly. Goals Section The information in the Goals reports can help you understand how visitors arrive, or don't arrive at your goals. For example, the Funnel Visualization report shows you the points at which visitors progress through or abandon the conversion steps (for example, shopping cart checkout process) you have defined. Tracking these pages reveals how efficiently your site directs visitors to your goal. If any of the funnel pages are overly complicated or hard to navigate, they'll show signs of significant visitor drop-off and lower conversion rates. This information helps you concentrate on improving the pages with the poorest performance for funneling users toward your site goal. In addition to tracking the funnels you have defined, you can also use the Reverse Goal Path to see if visitors are converting via other click paths. Ecommerce Section In addition to the Ecommerce metrics (available wherever you see the Ecommerce tab on reports), there is also an Ecommerce section that focuses exclusively on ecommerce activity. Please note that no data will appear in these reports (or on the Ecommerce tab in the reports in other sections) unless you have enabled ecommerce reporting. These reports show revenue (the value of purchases), conversion rate (the percentage of visits that resulted in a purchase), transactions (the number of purchase orders) and Average Order Value (the average revenue from each purchase). The Product Performance reports (Product Overview, Product SKUs, Categories) show you how many different products generate your revenue and you can click on any product name, SKU, or category to view detailed information for that item. The Transactions report lists of all transactions on your site and is useful for seeing all the ecommerce transactions that are being used to calculate ecommerce metrics. The Visits to Purchase and Time to Purchase reports help you understand your sales cycle by showing you how long it takes for visitors to purchase.
  • Search engines are the way in which 90% of people locate the internet resources they need and Google has a 75% market share in Europe and North America 84% of searchers never make it past the bottom of page 2 of Google and 65% of people never click on the paid/sponsored results. Websurfers appear to associate the number 1 slot with a quality brand. 15% of all sales in the UK are now completed online with predictions of up to 40% of all purchases by 2020 (uSwitch)
  • When Googlebot is on the site it crawls each page in turn, when it finds an internal link it will remember it and crawl it, either later in the visit or on a subsequent trip. Eventually it will crawl the whole site Imagine it like a tree, crawling up from the roots. If the site is well structured and has good symmetry the crawl will be even You can prevent Google from crawling some pages by using a robots.txt file www/google.com/addurl.html Other sites – the robot finds the link on another site and then finds yours Site maps – html page Google now prevents search engine submission software Expect to be crawled within a month. Pages in index 2-3 weeks after Redirect already indexed pages to the new page (eg a 301 redirect)
  • Anchor text - The visible text component of a hyperlink. Target pages of PR3 or higher At least 3 years old Have similar content, operate in the same niche (for relevance) 15,000 links may put you at risk or being superoveroptimized Build links gradually 5-20% deep links
  • Title is the most important: Carries the highest on-page weighting in the Google algorithm Search Engine Results Pages use the page title as the link for each result – its therefore the call to action for users – it needs to make them want to click Browsers display the title tag in the top bar of the window – so when users have multiple tabs open they need it as an aid Directory submission – some directories and librarians use the page title for listing any links to your site. They prefer titles that have the name of the site/business at the front Google truncates at 66 characters or the last complete full word, whichever is the smaller, Yahoo truncates at 120 characters (75 is used above as some browsers will truncate at this) Breadcrumb trail – Home page >> section name >> category name >> page name >> page description Example breadcrumb trail Chambers Business Printing >> Business Printing >> Business Cards >> Luxury Business Cards – Design and Order Luxury Business Cards Online This is too long at 135 characters. 65 characters could be: Chambers > Business Printing > Order Luxury Business Cards Online (luxury business cards is the “phrase that pays” for this page Look at page 101 for examples of truncation Capitalisation – poor grammar but research shows that using caps makes your linke stand out. Use & Try not to use Google stop words like the, an , and
  • Meta tags carry little SEO value. We use them though because they are used for snippet compilation and directory services pick them up for their directory listings Page 103
  • Page 110 for recommendations on density iCrossing keyword page analyser will help text the density so you can tweak the copy
  • HTML validators can spot missing alt tags
  • Ask.com looks at the number of outbound links form a site. Google likes inbound links Site:yourdomain.com (or in webmaster tools) Do Page rank checks with student URLs
  • www.musicademy.co.uk © Musicademy 2007
  • www.musicademy.co.uk © Musicademy 2007
  • Social Media in Ministry and The Marketplace

    1. 1. Social media in ministry and themarketplaceAn introduction to the breadth of online marketingand social media and how to use it effectively inboth ministry and business. © www.musicademy.co.uk
    2. 2. Timetable9.30-10.30 Introductions Social media basics The concept of Content Marketing10.45-11.45 Facebook and Edgerank1.15-2.15 Blogging E-newsletters Other social media platforms2.30-3.30 Search Engine Optimisation Google Analytics © www.musicademy.co.uk
    3. 3. Your Seminar Presenter:Marie Page BA (hons), FCIM, Chartered Marketer, PGCE – Director, Musicademy and Worship Backing Band – Digital Marketing Practitioner – Chartered Institute of Marketing Tutor & Examiner – Tutor for The Institute of Direct & Digital Marketing @Musicademy http://www.musicademy.com/store/smarter-facebook- marketing-guide.html for Marie’s Smarter Guide to Facebook Marketing ebook. Or buy here for $15 (booth F1) www.musicademy.com/blog For our worship blog and other free resources
    4. 4. About MusicademyDVDs & Online LearningGuitar, Vocals, KeysDrums, Bass, OrchestralPlaying by Earwww.musicademy.comWorship Backing BandFor churches with half a band or even noband at allYou choose the instrument mixYou play, it fills in for missing musiciansFeatures key and tempo changewww.worshipbackingband.com © www.musicademy.co.uk
    5. 5. A culture of participation• Dr Ryan Bolger http://vimeo.com/33500507• Following Jesus in participatory culture: Faithful living in a world mediated by technology © www.musicademy.co.uk
    6. 6. A culture of participation• Post modern culture is now a participatory culture• People have shifted from consuming to participating• TV – we used to consume (watch) it, now we tweet about it and actively participate• “If we can’t facilitate that kind of participation [in our churches] they will be fans of something else as opposed to forming their lives around the things we would be convinced would most benefit them” © www.musicademy.co.uk
    7. 7. Web 1.0• Like a stone tablet – unalterable form, no interaction• Many church websites are an online form of church notieceboard• Churches still think like 1950s communication channels © www.musicademy.co.uk
    8. 8. Web 2.0• The Interactive Web – Move from static webpages to dynamic and shareable content – Human collaboration – Social networking, wikis, blogs etc – Marked by interactivity and participation (by you and me rather than just techs) © www.musicademy.co.uk
    9. 9. Just how big a force is the web?• 6,500 daily newspapers• 20,000 readers for a good paperback• 14,000 titles published in the US each year• 200,000 periodicals published in the world• 129M book titles published last 500 years• 156M active blogs © www.musicademy.co.uk
    10. 10. Just how big a force is the web? © www.musicademy.co.uk
    11. 11. Web 2.0© www.musicademy.co.uk
    12. 12. © Marie Page @ www.musicademy.com
    13. 13. 2013 Social Media Revolution• http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=QUCfFcchw1w 13
    14. 14. Social Media Revolution Parody• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fT- eXw7Xsjo 14
    15. 15. © Marie Page @ www.musicademy.com
    16. 16. What’s the point?• It’s gone beyond technologyHow are people using it:• Find out where we are• Stay in touch• Chatter, inform and opine – is Twitter trivial? Most chat is trivial• Share critical news and info• Show off pictures• Go shopping• Save the phone bill © www.musicademy.co.uk
    17. 17. Why does the church need to bother?• In the beginning was The Word – a communications identity• The Word was made flesh – our job is to make the word of God live to people in their lives where they are (incarnation)• We are the body of Christ• We should be interested in revolutions – Christianity turns the world upside down• The best sermons are lived not preached. Social media communicates the nitty gritty of real life• The church (Acts) was a chain reaction. People communicating with other people. © www.musicademy.co.uk
    18. 18. Why does the church need to bother?• You can opt in and out of conversations on the level you want.• It is free. Not paranoid, boxed in and anxious• It’s a mixed bag. It allows people to be themselves• Allows for serendipity (eg cartwheeling verger) Space to be spirit led (not scripted)• Power of the question, not the unwanted answer• Gives power to the questioner, not the institution © www.musicademy.co.uk
    19. 19. © Marie Page @ www.musicademy.com
    20. 20. Social Media Explained © Marie Page @ www.musicademy.com
    21. 21. People tend to stick to the same five or six sites that they know and trust. Within these small ‘villages’ the marketer is replacing the shopkeeper – offering the customer things they might not spot themselves….With people self-selecting the villages they inhabit, marketers need to ensure they have a presence in those places, rather than trying to drive customers to their own sites, which is increasingly a much harder proposition. Taken from CIM’s Shape The Agenda paper “What hasn’t happened yet. The shape of digital to come” March 2010
    22. 22. Neilsen’s 2011 Q3 State of Social Media Report• Nearly 4 in 5 active internet users visit social networks or blogs• Americans spend more time on Facebook than any other website• 53% of adult social networkers follow a brand• http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/social/
    23. 23. What is Content Marketing?• “A marketing technique of creating and distributing relevant and valuable content to attract, acquire and engage a clearly defined target audience” Pulizzi and Barrett (2009).
    24. 24. The Guru’s Speak:• "Content is the only marketing left” Seth Godin• “No one cares about your products. Far better is for companies to start viewing themselves as sources of information” Brian Kardon, Eloqua• “The one who has the more engaging content wins, because frequent and regular contact builds a relationship” Joe Pulizzi, CMI• “Content is now a marketing cornerstone because: - Interruption marketing doesn’t work anymore - Customer behaviour and expectations are changing - Everyone is a publisher” Ann Handley, Marketing Profs
    25. 25. Why Content Marketing?• Interesting content is a top 3 reason people follow brands on social media (GetSatisfaction, 2011).• 3 in 4 marketers cite compelling content as a factor in closing sales, 70% of consumers prefer getting to know a company via articles rather than advertisements and 60% feel more positive about a company after reading content on its site. ContentPlus (2012)
    26. 26. Image: gapingvoid.com Think like a PUBLISHER not an advertiser• Not interruptive marketing that just sends messages• Engage with them• Create exceptional (great) content that people will want to share
    27. 27. 4 key Goals for content marketing• The ultimate goal of content marketing is to be so engaging that your customers will eventually buy, but before that you need to achieve one of these 4 foundational objectives to attract interest, increase page views and maintain reader loyalty.1. Educate• This type of content is often prefaced by a headline that starts with “How” . People’s thirst for knowing how to start a blog, market their business or solve a problem2. Inform• Keeping people up to date with the latest news was the domain of the newspaper, trade magazines or TV. Today the blog or social network is the source.3. Entertain• It doesn’t have to be a video and entertainment can also be a media type that informs and entertains. Infographics can also be included in this category. Humour is one of the vital components here.4. Inspire• This can be a challenge but inspiring people to be better, to push their limits or to be successful should be woven into your content. This content can be examples of other successful people that have overcome adversity people or creative examples that showcase others achievements. Thanks to Geraint Holliman of HPS Group for this and a couple of other slides
    28. 28. tsBlog Central – integrating social s e et retwe wemedia t re ts ee ret w •Industry news ted •Product know-how ee •Insights e In tw m om ts k ed •Features Lin Daily/weekly posts C n k n ar e c so •Top 10s ba eet /tw sts ts s •Humour Po pag e Other link s Po post/ •Videos (YouTube?) me om s •Content from other C t e n k k pag blogs ba c aceboo into F •Guest posts •Ask the Expert Blog Posts s& Li k e n t me com •Great links s Comme Posts b •Interviews nts e come e -newsle tters •Do’s & Don’ts back Comme Ot •Stories nts he Tec back DIG oratii, •Lists rs ite hn G, •Vodcasts s co The upshot: Lin EO Stu elicio •How-to articles py ks S •Great SEO mb D & & •Polls •Fresh new conten t leU s etc link Lin O •Integrated social media SE •Controversy ks pon •Multiple platf u •Multiple interacti orms & , •Intrigue •Your content whon points ere Yo •Etc Etc customers what it ur •Feedback©Marie Page 2010www.usingconversationalmedia.com
    29. 29. © Marie Page @ www.musicademy.com
    30. 30. Social Media - Facebook• 1 in 9 people in the world are on FB• Members of your congregation – Visitors – Teenagers – College Age – Seniors © www.musicademy.co.uk
    31. 31. Why is Facebook so effective?Dr BJ Fogg, of the Stanford University Persuasive Technology Lab has researched three reasons for its probable success:  Facebook helps us express identity - we join groups to express who we are, where we are from and what we like  Facebook helps us show support for other people or causes  Facebook is a place for us to have fun - groups with crazy titles, campaigns for ridiculous achievements (Rage Against the Machine for Christmas Number 1 anyone?)(cited in Perks & Sedley, Winners & Losers in a Troubled Economy, p 49)
    32. 32. Churches on Facebook• Facebook pages• Events• 2-way conversation• Q&A• Videos, polls• Sermons• Snippets• Scriptures being studied• Music• Discussions• Opportunity to “Share” © www.musicademy.co.uk
    33. 33. Churches on Facebook• Get your congregation involved• Give them posts to share• Link via your website and on your other communications• Use photos well• Books to read• Quotes from the pastor• Look forward too…• Prepare your hearts, read…• In depth reading• Book quotes © www.musicademy.co.uk
    34. 34. Basics• Set up a church FB page• If your current page is a group or private profile, convert it to an organization page• Set a vanity url “facebook.com/mychurch”• Make the graphics on your Facebook match the design on your website• Begin posting consistently
    35. 35. Facebook “Fan” Pages Cover image Admin “Favicon” Timeline Number of fans PTAT Check-ins About Apps/Tabs Posts by others Sponsored Story ad options
    36. 36. Facebook “Fan” Pages Posts “Favicon” Recommendation s Reach Pages we likePromoted Post
    37. 37. The Admin Panel Messages from fansNotifications New FansInsights data
    38. 38. Facebook Glossary•• Fan - a Facebook user who signs up to follow Fan - a Facebook user who signs up to follow •• News feed ––the content posted on your News feed the content posted on your your page by clicking “like” on it your page by clicking “like” on it wall which includes the aggregation of wall which includes the aggregation of your friends individual newsfeeds too your friends individual newsfeeds too•• Friend – someone you are connected to on Friend – someone you are connected to on Facebook via your personal Profiles. Also used Facebook via your personal Profiles. Also used as a verb when you add someone as a Friend •• Page ––the place where organisations (or Page the place where organisations (or as a verb when you add someone as a Friend (to Friend) (to Friend) celebrities) “live” on Facebook. The Page celebrities) “live” on Facebook. The Page is the organisation’s equivalent of aa is the organisation’s equivalent of• Profile. This is where you share Profile. This is where you share• Friend List – an organised grouping of friends – Friend List – an organised grouping of friends – you might segment your friends into lists information and interact with fans information and interact with fans you might segment your friends into lists perhaps by work, family, real friends(!) etc perhaps by work, family, real friends(!) etc •• Profile ––the place where individuals Profile the place where individuals•• Group – a collection of Facebook users that Group – a collection of Facebook users that “live” on Facebook. This is where you “live” on Facebook. This is where you have a common interest – any Facebook user have a common interest – any Facebook user share information and interact with share information and interact with can create a Group can create a Group friends. friends.•• Network – a collection of Facebook users Network – a collection of Facebook users •• Wall ––the main element of your profile Wall the main element of your profile identifying with a particular region, school or identifying with a particular region, school or workplace – you can join up to 5 networks on or page that shows new content, or page that shows new content, workplace – you can join up to 5 networks on Facebook Facebook comment and recent actions comment and recent actions
    39. 39. Simple content ideas - Polls
    40. 40. Simple content ideas – Video clips Video uploaded directly to Facebook
    41. 41. Simple content ideas – Ask the Expert (Questions)
    42. 42. Simple content ideas – Friday Facebook Question
    43. 43. Simple content ideas – Freebies / Try before you buy
    44. 44. Simple content ideas – Links to other relevant sites
    45. 45. Simple content ideas – Links to blog posts
    46. 46. Simple content ideas – Top 10s / Do’s and Don’t’s
    47. 47. Simple content ideas – Asking Opinions
    48. 48. Asking advice “Wow, Marie, I am completely overwhelmed by all the posts, amazing! I am going to sit down with my boy and well go through them all in detail! Love the suggestions also about him composing his own stuff. Many, many thanks.” Liz
    49. 49. Simple content ideas – Tags and Check-ins
    50. 50. Simple content ideas – Product profiles/launches
    51. 51. Simple content ideas – Happenings in the office
    52. 52. Simple content ideas – Controversy
    53. 53. Simple content ideas – Humour
    54. 54. How to find fans – prominent links on your website & emails Helping Marketers Succ eed Online
    55. 55. The Facebook Edgerank Algorithm• Every bit of FB content is known as an “edge”- status update, a like, a photo, a change in relationship status• The newsfeed isn’t really a feed of news, instead it’s a chart of the most ‘important’ Edges which are determined by the EdgeRank Algorithm.Traditionally 3 elements: What about the new “Spam” – Affinity score? – Edge weight – Recency
    56. 56. EdgeRank is now based on four things:• Yours and other peoples relationship with a brand (affinity): the more you and other people engage with a post, the more likely you are to see it• The type of post: simple status updates seem to trump other content now• Time: the older a post is, the less likely it is to be viewed...with a catch (which I will explain below).• EdgeRank is now also ranked based on the level of negative feedback a brand and posts receives.• In short, engagement and the type of post improves your EdgeRank score, while the time decay and the negative feedback makes it worse. These four factors combined is what determines the success of your post.• http://www.baekdal.com
    57. 57. They may be fans but do they see your updates? 203% PTAT!
    58. 58. Photos vs status updates Photos vs status updates Lessons for Lessons for understanding understanding Edgerank: Edgerank: Plain text status updates have Plain text status updates have more weight than photos so drive more weight than photos so drive more reach. more reach. Likes: 64 Likes: 64 Comments: 7 Comments: 7 Shares: 1 Shares: 1 Reach: 1444 Reach: 1444Likes: 59Likes: 59Comments: 8Comments: 8Shares: 0Shares: 0Reach: 853Reach: 853
    59. 59. Likes: 64 Likes: 64 Comments: 7 Comments: 7 Likes: 15 Likes: 15 Shares: 1 Shares: 1 Comments: 19 Comments: 19 Reach: 1444 Reach: 1444 Shares: 1 Shares: 1Likes: 16Likes: 16 Reach: 1419 Reach: 1419Comments: 2Comments: 2Shares: 0Shares: 0Reach: 1171Reach: 1171 Plain text updates Plain text updates Lessons for understanding Lessons for understanding Edgerank: Edgerank: Reach is driven by engagement. The Reach is driven by engagement. The more engagement, the higher the more engagement, the higher the reach. reach. Comments drive reach more than likes Comments drive reach more than likes Likes: 3 Likes: 3 Comments: Comments: 56 56 Shares: 1 Shares: 1 Reach: 2294 Reach: 2294 Likes: 39 Likes: 39 Comments: 6 Comments: 6 Shares: 1 Shares: 1 Reach: 1507 Reach: 1507
    60. 60. Photos Photos Lessons for Lessons for understanding understanding Edgerank: Edgerank: High numbers of Likes and High numbers of Likes and Comments will drive more reach Comments will drive more reachLikes: 12Likes: 12Comments: 0Comments: 0Shares: 4Shares: 4Reach: 525Reach: 525 Likes: 59 Likes: 59 Comments: 8 Comments: 8 Shares: 0 Shares: 0 Reach: 853 Reach: 853 Likes: 11 Likes: 11 Comments: 2 Comments: 2 Shares: 2 Shares: 2 Reach: 581 Reach: 581
    61. 61. Blogging• Write a list of all the questions you are asked about your church/business on a regular basis:• How do I…?• Should I…?• What do you think about…?• How do I know if…?• Is it worth spending money on…?• Do you know where…?• What would you recommend for…?• What do you predict will happen to…? 63
    62. 62. What is a blog?• Musicademy business blog: www.musicademy.com/blog• Top 200 church blogs here :http://churchrelevance.com/resources/top -church-blogs/• Youth leader blog: http://beccaislearning.com/ © www.musicademy.co.uk
    63. 63. Benefits of a Company or Church blog1. Help you sharpen your pitch to prospective customers / congregants2. Show that your company/church is full of real people with opinions3. Build backlinks (great for SEO)4. Show that youre more competent than the competition / show your distinctive culture and personality5. Good place to store and chronicle information6. Enables conversations7. Encourages regular traffic8. Shows you are in touch (with communication technology and your sector)9. Allows people to “try before they buy”10. Allows you to respond in an emergency
    64. 64. Content ideas - Devotionals © www.musicademy.co.uk
    65. 65. Content ideas – Stuff from the media © www.musicademy.co.uk
    66. 66. Content ideas – your videos © www.musicademy.co.uk
    67. 67. Content ideas – promoting events © www.musicademy.co.uk
    68. 68. Content ideas – funny videos © www.musicademy.co.uk
    69. 69. Content ideas – “curated” content © www.musicademy.co.uk
    70. 70. Content ideas – meaty issues/controversy © www.musicademy.co.uk
    71. 71. Content ideas – useful resources © www.musicademy.co.uk
    72. 72. Content ideas - freebies © www.musicademy.co.uk
    73. 73. Content ideas – Ask the Expert © www.musicademy.co.uk
    74. 74. Content ideas – series/theology/opinion © www.musicademy.co.uk
    75. 75. Content ideas - articles © www.musicademy.co.uk
    76. 76. Content ideas – sharing homegrown resources © www.musicademy.co.uk
    77. 77. Content ideas – songs/music © www.musicademy.co.uk
    78. 78. Content ideas – sharing best practice © www.musicademy.co.uk
    79. 79. Content ideas – Plugging products © www.musicademy.co.uk
    80. 80. E-newslettersBlog content:=>Newsletter articles=>Facebook content=>LinkedIn content=>Twitter status=>Incoming links © www.musicademy.co.uk
    81. 81. Email & newsletter platforms - Mailchimp © www.musicademy.co.uk
    82. 82. Split testing subject lines © www.musicademy.co.uk
    83. 83. Which articles get the most clicks? © www.musicademy.co.uk
    84. 84. Mailchimp tracking © www.musicademy.co.uk
    85. 85. Mailchimp Tracking © www.musicademy.co.uk
    86. 86. Customer Insights © www.musicademy.co.uk
    87. 87. Twitter© www.musicademy.co.uk
    88. 88. LinkedIn (Groups) © www.musicademy.co.uk
    89. 89. LinkedIn (Groups) © www.musicademy.co.uk
    90. 90. Response Ability• Are you engaging others?• Can you respond to criticism well?• How long does it take you to respond?• Are you listening? © www.musicademy.co.uk
    91. 91. Need extra help?• DIY www.usingconversationalmedia.com To download Marie’s ebook “The Art of Conversation” – a practical how-to guide to using social media• Outsource some help Eg from IceCream Social Experts © www.musicademy.co.uk
    92. 92. Websites and Google AnlayticsYou’ve got a website, but do you know howwell it’s working?Learn to improve the design content andnavigation of your website using Google Analytics.Plus:Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) © www.musicademy.co.uk
    93. 93. This part of the seminarToday we will cover:• How to create a Google Analytics account• Advantages of Google Analytics• Metrics jargon• The dashboard• Live demonstration of drilling down into a real website’s metrics• Further help• Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) basics 96
    94. 94. Google Analytics• An amazing set of free tools from Google – See how many people access your site, from where and how long they stay – Monitor your paid and organic search traffic – Track goal conversion – Monitor campaign return on investment – See how customers navigate your site – Discover how customers find you – Find out which pages turn your customers off – Learn which keywords people use to find you
    95. 95. Creating an Analytics Account• Google Analytics will not affect: – The performance – The appearance of your website and – There are no extra files to host – Also, it’s a set of results – you can’t break it!• Head to http://google.com/analytics/• Create an account• Log in, read through and input data to the settings page
    96. 96. Code Installation• To install, paste the Google Analytics Tracking Code anywhere in to your pages HTML code.• Place the code at the bottom of your pages code (directly before the closing </body> tag) to avoid any possible issues with your page loading at a slower rate.
    97. 97. Advantages of Google Analytics• Easy to use• Documentation and help• Integration with AdWords• Its free!But:• No individual customer journeys• No retrospective goals/funnels/filters• No access to the underlying data
    98. 98. Metrics JargonMetric MeaningUnique Visitor The number of individuals who visit a website in a fixed time periodVisit One visit by a single customer. Visit ends after no activity for 30 minutesPage impression One person viewing one web pageHit Request serviced by a web server. Not a measure of numbers of people viewing the pageConversion User achieves a defined goal
    99. 99. Logging in
    100. 100. The Google Analytics Dashboard
    101. 101. Google Analytics – Reports• Audience (visitors)• Advertising• Traffic Sources• Content• Conversions
    102. 102. Google Analytics – Reports
    103. 103. Visitor Flow© Marie Page @ www.musicademy.com
    104. 104. Further Help• Google Analytics Conversion University• Advanced Web Analytics with GA – Brian Clifton• Avinash Kaushik’s blog• Web Analytics Demystified BooksConsultancy and bespoke training• Lynchpin (Andrew Hood)
    105. 105. Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) © Marie Page @ www.musicademy.com
    106. 106. Cutting through the jargon © Marie Page @ www.musicademy.com
    107. 107. How do search engines work?• http://www.google.com/howgoogleworks/• http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=h0xUHykOPtY• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_search_e ngine 110
    108. 108. Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)The ingredients that make a site likely to be found:• A great website• Keywords• Unique fresh content• Site map• Page optimisation• Back links• Paid for links• Likes, reviews, comments• Languages, geography, Google Earth, Google Maps and local search priming• Tracking and tuning 111
    109. 109. Helping Google crawl your pages• Submit your URL• Get other sites to link to yours• Sign up for Google Webmaster Tools, verify your site and submit a sitemapSite Structure – the cascade(breadcrumb trail)• Home page• Section pages• Category pages• Content pages
    110. 110. SEO Tricks
    111. 111. “Backing vocals” in• url• H1 Page title• H2Unique contentMissing:•Alt text•Backlinks•Multi-media•Social mediamentions © Marie Page @ www.musicademy.com
    112. 112. SEO Tricks• Back links• Unique content• URL using keywords• H1, H2, H3, Alt text• Multimedia• Use the SEO add-in• Comments/UGC• Social media mentions
    113. 113. Back Links• The most important element• Links from high PageRank sites are best• Active linking (submitting or requesting a link)• Passive linking (link baiting) – creating attractive content for others to link back to• 250-750 unique links ideal with key phrases in the anchor text• Main links and deep links
    114. 114. The Google AlgorithmGoogle’s algorithm combines:• Relative importance• Relevance• ReliabilityTo determine the overall significance of a page for any given search• The PageRank algorithm determines the relative importance of all pages using link quality and source importance• The TrustRank algorithm determines source reliability mainly using age• The Text Matching algorithm determines the relevance of both site and source using link quality and other related factors
    115. 115. • Page Optimisation Heading Tags• <h1>Heading text here</h1>• <h2>First subheading text here</h2>Image alt tag• Labels for images so that search engines and partically sighted users can “see” the images• Good opportunity for keywordsURLs• Again, make keyword denseDocuments• Recode the meta data in all documents, and pdfs to add meaningful titles and add keywordsVideo• Code your titles with keywords• Load to Youtube, Google Video, Vimeo etc
    116. 116. Page Optimisation• Page title - the <title> tag which appears in the <head> section – Ideally truncates at 66 and 75 characters – Each page should be different – Begin with the name of your business and in the form of a breadcrumb trail – Try to incorporate something to incentivise the user to click on the link – Make it keyword dense - keywords in the title tag should be repeated in the URL, the meta keyword tag, headings tags and page body text
    117. 117. Page Optimisation• Meta Description tag – placed between the <head> tags• Provides a brief description of page content building on the headline in the title tags• <meta name=“description” content=“your description here.”/>• 24-26 words of max 180 characters (for good snippet use)• Keyword tag – placed between the <head> tags• Provides a brief description of page content building on the headline in the title tags• <meta name=“keywords” content=“keyword1,keyword2,key phrase1”/>• 35-50 words max
    118. 118. Page OptimisationBody Text• Keep pages as short as you can (450-600 words)• Have more sections, categories and pages if you need more• Less pages mean for better keyword proximity and density• Use bold to pick out keywords sparingly• Don’t use underline unless it’s a link• Divide into short paragraphs• Scatter keyword chains throughout• Call to action or summary at the end (see snippets section)
    119. 119. Page OptimisationInternal Links• Tests show people prefer split-menu navigation (tabs across the top and left side)• Use keywords in these links• Link words within the text to relevant pages• Mailto: links either to you for feedback or to recommend a friend• Add to favourites link for bookmarking
    120. 120. Page OptimisationOutbound Links• Google uses your outbound links to identify “related sites”• Ask.com looks at outbound links when allocating page rank• Link to websites with a higher page rank than yours• Avoid links on “money pages” – you don’t want to lose customers that would otherwise have bought• Consider No Follow links so you don’t lose the search robots from your site as quickly
    121. 121. For Further Information The Smarter Facebook Marketing Guide Written by Marie Page. Published by Smart Insights, one of the UK’s leading digital marketing websites and edited by all round digital guru Dr Dave Chaffey. How will this guide help me? 23,000 word, 90 page A4 page PDF Ebook To buy: $15 at the Musicademy booth or paid to Marie after the seminars or go to: http://www.musicademy.com/store/uk/sale/smart er-facebook-marketing-guide.html or http://goo.gl/TQb4W © www.musicademy.co.uk
    122. 122. For Further Information• www.musicademy.com• Sign up for free resources and to receive our weekly e-newsletter packed with useful articles and special offers• Sign up on our mailing list at the Musicademy booth or via the clipboard to receive these teaching notes by email © www.musicademy.co.uk

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