MedicalResearch.com                       Medical Research Author interviews                            Editor: Marie Benz...
Medical Disclaimer | Terms and Conditions•   The contents of the Hemodialysis.com Site, such as text, graphics, images, an...
Genome-wide reprogramming of the chromatin landscape underlies endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer              ...
Genome-wide reprogramming of the chromatin landscape underlies endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer              ...
Interpolated memory tests reduce mind wandering and improve learning of online lectures                        MedicalRese...
Interpolated memory tests reduce mind wandering and improve learning of online lectures                        MedicalRese...
Interpolated memory tests reduce mind wandering and improve learning of online lectures                         MedicalRes...
Pathway-based personalized analysis of cancer                                 MedicalResearch.com Author Interview:       ...
Pathway-based personalized analysis of cancer                             MedicalResearch.com Author Interview:           ...
Pathway-based personalized analysis of cancer                                 MedicalResearch.com Author Interview:       ...
Discontinuation of Statins in Routine Care Settings: A Cohort Study                  MedicalResearch.com Interview Dr. Ale...
Discontinuation of Statins in Routine Care Settings: A Cohort Study               MedicalResearch.com Interview Dr. Alexan...
Discontinuation of Statins in Routine Care Settings: A Cohort Study               MedicalResearch.com Interview Dr. Alexan...
Discontinuation of Statins in Routine Care Settings: A Cohort Study                  MedicalResearch.com Interview Dr. Ale...
Time to First Cigarette and 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanol (NNAL) Levels in Adult Smokers; National        ...
Time to First Cigarette and 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanol (NNAL) Levels in Adult Smokers; National        ...
Time to First Cigarette and 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanol (NNAL) Levels in Adult Smokers; National        ...
Time to First Cigarette and 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanol (NNAL) Levels in Adult Smokers; National        ...
Cancer Survivors in the United States: Prevalence across the Survivorship Trajectory                                      ...
Cancer Survivors in the United States: Prevalence across the Survivorship Trajectory                                      ...
Cancer Survivors in the United States: Prevalence across the Survivorship Trajectory                                      ...
The subjective–objective mismatch in sleep perception among those with insomnia and sleep apnea                           ...
The subjective–objective mismatch in sleep perception among those with insomnia and sleep apnea                           ...
The subjective–objective mismatch in sleep perception among those with insomnia and sleep apnea                           ...
Predictors of depression in breast cancer patients treated with radiation:                       Role of prior chemotherap...
Predictors of depression in breast cancer patients treated with radiation:                         Role of prior chemother...
Adipocyte Fatty Acid storage factors enhance subcutaneous fat storage in postmenopausal women                             ...
Adipocyte Fatty Acid storage factors enhance subcutaneous fat storage in postmenopausal women                             ...
Relationship of Early-Onset Baldness to Prostate Cancer in African-American Men                            MEDICALRESEARCH...
Relationship of Early-Onset Baldness to Prostate Cancer in African-American Men                                MEDICALRESE...
Relationship of Early-Onset Baldness to Prostate Cancer in African-American Men                              MEDICALRESEAR...
Genetic factors in evolution of sleep length – a longitudinal twin study in Finnish adults                              Me...
Genetic factors in evolution of sleep length – a longitudinal twin study in Finnish adults                              Me...
Genetic factors in evolution of sleep length – a longitudinal twin study in Finnish adults                              Me...
Genetic factors in evolution of sleep length – a longitudinal twin study in Finnish adults                              Me...
Independent associations between fatty acids and sleep quality among obese patients                               with obs...
Independent associations between fatty acids and sleep quality among obese patients                               with obs...
Independent associations between fatty acids and sleep quality among obese patients                               with obs...
Novel Susceptibility Variants at 10p12.31-12.2 for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia                                 ...
Novel Susceptibility Variants at 10p12.31-12.2 for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia                                 ...
Novel Susceptibility Variants at 10p12.31-12.2 for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia                                 ...
Coupled Cognitive and Functional Change in Alzheimer’s Disease and the Influence of Depressive Symptoms                   ...
Coupled Cognitive and Functional Change in Alzheimer’s Disease and the Influence of Depressive Symptoms                   ...
Coupled Cognitive and Functional Change in Alzheimer’s Disease and the Influence of Depressive Symptoms                   ...
MedicalResearch.com                       Medical Research Author interviews                            Editor: Marie Benz...
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Medical research.com slideshare april 3 2012

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MedicalResearch.com: Interviews with top medical researchers regarding their recently published medical research.

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Medical research.com slideshare april 3 2012

  1. 1. MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Author interviews Editor: Marie Benz, MD info@hemodialysis.com April 3 2013 For Informational Purposes Only: Not for Specific Medical Advice. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 1 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  2. 2. Medical Disclaimer | Terms and Conditions• The contents of the Hemodialysis.com Site, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on the Hemodialysis.com Site ("Content") are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on the Hemodialysis.com Site!• If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Hemodialysis.com does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Site. Reliance on any information provided by Hemodialysis.com or other Eminent Domains Inc (EDI) websites, EDI employees, others appearing on the Site at the invitation of Hemodialysis.com or EDI, or other visitors to the Site is solely at your own risk.• The Site may contain health- or medical-related materials that are sexually explicit. If you find these materials offensive, you may not want to use our Site. The Site and the Content are provided on an "as is" basis. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 2 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  3. 3. Genome-wide reprogramming of the chromatin landscape underlies endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer MedicalResearch.com eInterview with Dr. Mathieu Lupien PhD Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network Ontario Cancer Institute (OCI) Assistant Professor Department of Medical Biophysics University of Toronto• MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. Lupien: Approximately 50% of breast cancer patients fail to respond to the standard of care based on endocrine (hormonal) therapy. Our research identifies a mechanism that accounts for this resistance. Drugs against this mechanism are already tested for other diseases. Hence, our discovery should rapidly help reposition these drugs against endocrine therapy resistant breast cancer. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?• Dr. Lupien: The key scientific discovery is that our findings came from interrogating the epigenome of breast cancer cells, the cosmetic layer of information on top of the DNA. This allowed us to understand how regions outside of genes differed in endocrine therapy responsive versus resistant breast cancer cells. These non- genic regions harbor a wealth of functional information that we are just starting to explore for cancer research. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 3 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  4. 4. Genome-wide reprogramming of the chromatin landscape underlies endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer MedicalResearch.com eInterview with Dr. Mathieu Lupien PhD Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network Ontario Cancer Institute (OCI) Assistant Professor Department of Medical Biophysics University of Toronto (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. Lupien: Understanding the mechanisms that lead to drug response or resistance can help identify alternatives. Our work identifies a mechanism of resistance and also provides the companion test to identify endocrine therapy resistant patient. Taken together, our work should be of significant benefit as we move forward in validating our discoveries in the clinic.• MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Dr. Lupien: The field of epigenetic is just starting to reveal its immense potential to help understand the mechanism underlying cancer development and progression. We need to increase funding in this field of research.• Citation:• Genome-wide reprogramming of the chromatin landscape underlies endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer• Luca Magnani, Alexander Stoeck, Xiaoyang Zhang, András Lánczky, Anne C. Mirabella, Tian-Li Wang, Balázs Gyorffy, and Mathieu Lupien• PNAS 2013 ; published ahead of print April 1, 2013, doi:10.1073/pnas.1219992110 For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 4 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  5. 5. Interpolated memory tests reduce mind wandering and improve learning of online lectures MedicalResearch.com Interview with Karl K. Szpunar PhD Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138• edicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. Szpunar: The results of our experiments demonstrate that students can have difficulty paying attention to online lectures, and that including brief quizzes during lectures can help to alleviate this problem. Specifically, we found that students who were tested throughout a 21-minute long Statistics lecture were half as likely to mind wander during the lecture, three times as likely to take additional notes, and much better able to retain the contents of the lecture at a later time. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 5 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  6. 6. Interpolated memory tests reduce mind wandering and improve learning of online lectures MedicalResearch.com Interview with Karl K. Szpunar PhD Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected:• Dr. Szpunar: Perhaps the most unanticipated finding in our experiments was the extent to which students mind wandered during lectures in the absence of intermittent testing. Throughout the lecture, we would ask students whether or not they were paying attention to the lecture at that moment or whether their mind’s had wandered to another topic or concern (e.g., what will I be doing later today, what are my weekend plans, etc.).• Students who never received tests during the lecture reported mind wandering 40% of the time. That is, they were not paying attention to the lecture almost every other time we probed them. This number is quite high considering that we conducted our experiments in a controlled experimental setting. In fact, this number may be higher when considering the various distractions that are present when students learn from online lectures in the comfort of their own homes or in actual classrooms. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 6 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  7. 7. Interpolated memory tests reduce mind wandering and improve learning of online lectures MedicalResearch.com Interview with Karl K. Szpunar PhD Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. Szpunar: The results of our studies may have important implications for teaching and learning practices associated with people who have heightened difficult paying attention to their immediate surroundings, such as those diagnosed with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.• MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Dr. Szpunar: The primary purpose of the present study was to attempt to identify methods of teaching that can help students make better use of their study time. Along these lines, we would recommend that tightly controlled experimental studies can be a strong source of information in helping to develop online learning platforms.• Citation:• Interpolated memory tests reduce mind wandering and improve learning of online lectures• Karl K. Szpunar, Novall Y. Khan, and Daniel L. Schacter PNAS 2013 ; published ahead of print April 1, 2013, doi:10.1073/pnas.1221764110 For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 7 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  8. 8. Pathway-based personalized analysis of cancer MedicalResearch.com Author Interview: Prof. Eytan Domany Department of Physics of Complex Systems and Department of Biological Regulation Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 76100, Israel• MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Prof. Domany: The findings are two-fold: methodological and clinical. A novel method was introduced for personalized analysis of cancer, and was applied on large colon cancer and glioblastoma datasets.• The method uses high throughput (gene expression) data to infer a pathway deregulation score (PDS) for individual tumors, for hundreds of pathways and biological processes. The method is knowledge-based in that it uses well known information about the assignment of genes to biologically relevant pathways. No detailed knowledge of the underlying networks of interactions and activations is necessary. Each tumor is represented by a few hundred of these PDSs, and further analysis uses this representation.• One of the clinically relevant findings is the discovery that the reported relatively longer survival of subjects with neural and proneural glioblastoma is due to a new subtype of these tumors – when these are excluded, the neural/proneural patients do not survive longer than the other subgroups. For both diseases, pathways whose deregulation level is indicative of prognosis were discovered and validated on independent datasets. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 8 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  9. 9. Pathway-based personalized analysis of cancer MedicalResearch.com Author Interview: Prof. Eytan Domany Department of Physics of Complex Systems and Department of Biological Regulation Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 76100, Israel (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Prof. Domany: This is a new and promising way to use high- throughput genomic data for prognosis, and hopefully also for personalized prediction of response to therapy. Even though there is still a long way to go till direct clinical applicability of the method, some of the findings are very promising. The reported sub-stratification of glioblastoma patients provides a robust prognostic predictor. In colon cancer two pathways were found with deregulation scores that exhibit very significant correlation with survival: CXCR3-mediated signaling and oxidative phosphorylation – both may find their way into the clinic as prognostic tools. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 9 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  10. 10. Pathway-based personalized analysis of cancer MedicalResearch.com Author Interview: Prof. Eytan Domany Department of Physics of Complex Systems and Department of Biological Regulation Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 76100, Israel (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Prof. Domany: On the methodological side, this study demonstrates how tumors can be represented by individual “higher level” biologically relevant scores. On a more fundamental level, the study proves the strengths and advantages of a phenomenological approach, taking a golden path between ignorance-based machine learning approaches and the overkill of requiring full knowledge of every mechanistic detail. As to resulting clinical research, once the clinical relevance of the deregulation score of a pathway is substantiated, its level of deregulation in a particular tumor sample may be assessed directly, with no need for measurement of expression. Such direct measurements of pathway activity can then be used as a reliable and robust personalized prognostic biomarker.• Citation:• Pathway-based personalized analysis of cancer• Yotam Drier, Michal Sheffer, and Eytan Domany PNAS 2013 ; published ahead of print April 1, 2013, doi:10.1073/pnas.1219651110 For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 10 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  11. 11. Discontinuation of Statins in Routine Care Settings: A Cohort Study MedicalResearch.com Interview Dr. Alexander Turchin M.D.,M.S. Director of Informatics Research, Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension Brigham and Women’s Hospital Boston, MA• MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. Turchi: A large number of patients – 17% of individuals included in our study – report side effects to statins in routine care settings. Nearly 60% of these patients stopped the statin at least temporarily. However, overwhelming majority of patients who stopped taking a statin after experiencing a possible side effect, could tolerate a statin long-term if they tried taking one again. In other words, it appears that many statin-related events are tolerable, specific to individual statins or have other causes. These findings are consistent with the current guidelines that urge a conservative approach to statin discontinuation. They are particularly important because statins have been convincingly shown to save lives – they decrease all-cause mortality, and also cardiovascular mortality and incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic heart disease and / or elevated cholesterol levels. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 11 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  12. 12. Discontinuation of Statins in Routine Care Settings: A Cohort Study MedicalResearch.com Interview Dr. Alexander Turchin M.D.,M.S. Director of Informatics Research, Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension Brigham and Women’s Hospital Boston, MA (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?• Dr. Turchi: Based on our clinical experience, we expected to see some degree of tolerability of statins in patients who previously stopped them because of possible side effects. However, the sheer magnitude – more than 90% of patients who tried a statin again were able to take it long-term – was a surprise. These results underscore how important it is to consider another trial of a statin – possibly a different statin or the same statin at a lower dose – for patients who have stopped a statin because of a possible adverse reaction. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 12 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  13. 13. Discontinuation of Statins in Routine Care Settings: A Cohort Study MedicalResearch.com Interview Dr. Alexander Turchin M.D.,M.S. Director of Informatics Research, Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension Brigham and Women’s Hospital Boston, MA (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. Turchi: Both clinicians and patients should note that a re-trial of a statin should be considered in individuals who have experienced mild to moderate symptoms that were thought to be due to a statin. Not everyone would be a candidate; restarting a statin would not be appropriate, for example, in someone who had a life-threatening reaction, such as rhabdomyolysis. Therefore the findings of our study should not lead to a hard and fast rule but rather be a factor taken into consideration when evaluating the whole patient and their particular circumstances. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 13 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  14. 14. Discontinuation of Statins in Routine Care Settings: A Cohort Study MedicalResearch.com Interview Dr. Alexander Turchin M.D.,M.S. Director of Informatics Research, Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension Brigham and Women’s Hospital Boston, MA (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Dr. Turchi: Our study was based on observational data. Its results should be confirmed with an interventional clinical trial aimed to determine whether rechallenging patients who stopped their statins after a possible side effect improves important clinical outcomes, such as incidence of cardiovascular events and / or death. It is also important to continue to look into other reasons why statins may be stopped by patients and their clinicians, and how unnecessary discontinuation of statins can be prevented or minimized.• Citation:• Discontinuation of Statins in Routine Care Settings: A Cohort Study• Huabing Zhang, MD; Jorge Plutzky, MD; Stephen Skentzos, BA, BS; Fritha Morrison, MPH; Perry Mar, PhD; Maria Shubina, ScD; and Alexander Turchin, MD, MS Ann Intern Med 2 April 2013: Vol. 158, No. 158, pp. I-40 For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 14 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  15. 15. Time to First Cigarette and 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanol (NNAL) Levels in Adult Smokers; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007–2010 MedicalResearch.com Author Interview: Dr. Steven A. Branstetter, PhD The Pennsylvania State University, 315 E. HHD, University Park, PA 16810.• MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. Branstetter: This study demonstrated that the time to the first cigarette of the day after waking is associated with increased levels of a NNAL, a metabolite of a powerful tobacco-specific carcinogen, NNK — even after controlling for the total number of cigarettes smoked per day.• For years, the time to the first cigarette of the day after waking was one of several questions assessing nicotine dependence on the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND), the gold standard questionnaire int he field. Over time, it was found that much of the predictive validity of the FTND was due to the time to first cigarette item. Researchers have found that single time to first cigarette item was highly correlated with other measures of nicotine dependence, and was predictive of more difficulty quitting smoking and increased intake of nicotine. Our current study demonstrates that this behavioral measure, is predictive of exposure to the cancer-causing components of cigarettes, regardless of the total number of cigarettes smoked per day. The results suggest that researchers, clinicians and smokers can assess the level of nicotine dependence and potential cancer risk by looking at the time to the first cigarette of the day after waking. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 15 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  16. 16. Time to First Cigarette and 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanol (NNAL) Levels in Adult Smokers; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007–2010 MedicalResearch.com Author Interview: Dr. Steven A. Branstetter, PhD The Pennsylvania State University, 315 E. HHD, University Park, PA 16810. (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?• Dr. Branstetter: Given our previous work, we did expect that time to first cigarette of the day after waking would relate to levels of NNAL among these smokers. However, the fact that time to first cigarette continued to predict NNAL levels even after controlling for a number of other potential explanatory factors, including the number of cigarettes smoker per day, number of years as a regular smoker, and having other smokers in the home, was somewhat surprising. The emerging evidence suggests that this single behavioral measure may be among the best at predicting nicotine dependence, risk exposure, and difficulty quitting. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 16 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  17. 17. Time to First Cigarette and 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanol (NNAL) Levels in Adult Smokers; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007–2010 MedicalResearch.com Author Interview: Dr. Steven A. Branstetter, PhD The Pennsylvania State University, 315 E. HHD, University Park, PA 16810. (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. Branstetter: The take home message is that how soon after waking up a smoker reaches for a cigarette is a very strong indicator of dependence and risk. Traditionally, clinicians have asked about the number of cigarettes smoked per day, which is still an important factor. However, the total number of cigarettes smoked may not always be the best question to ask to assess dependence or risk: for example, there is a non-linear relationship between cigarettes per day and blood levels of cotinine (the metabolite of nicotine). At some level after about 20 cigarettes per day, nicotine levels plateau such that someone smoking 25 cigarettes may have similar blood cotinine levels as someone smoking 40 cigarettes per day. Therefore, asking about the time to the first cigarette of the day after waking may tell clinicians (and patients) about the level of addiction, how difficult it may be to quit, and perhaps even the risk of lung cancer. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 17 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  18. 18. Time to First Cigarette and 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanol (NNAL) Levels in Adult Smokers; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007–2010 MedicalResearch.com Author Interview: Dr. Steven A. Branstetter, PhD The Pennsylvania State University, 315 E. HHD, University Park, PA 16810. (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Dr. Branstetter: The biggest question that we are looking into is what exactly the time to first cigarette is telling us. Our best guess is that time to first cigarette reflects how smokers are going about smoking their cigarettes. They are likely inhaling more deeply, holding their smoke longer, and taking more puffs per cigarette. Unfortunately, we don’t yet fully understand why time to first cigarette is so strongly related to these outcomes. Our future studies will be providing smokers with a small topography device that measures exactly how each cigarette, especially the first cigarette of the day, is smoked.• Citation:• Time to First Cigarette and 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanol (NNAL) Levels in Adult Smokers; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007–2010• S. A. Branstetter, J. E. Muscat. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 2013; 22 (4): 615 DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-0842 For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 18 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  19. 19. Cancer Survivors in the United States: Prevalence across the Survivorship Trajectory and Implications for Care MedicalResearch.com Interview with Janet S. de Moor, PhD, MPH Program Director, Office of Cancer Survivorship Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD 20891-8336• MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. de Moor: The number of people who have been diagnosed with cancer during their lifetime has been steadily increasing. As of January 1, 2012, approximately 13.7 million cancer survivors were living in the United States with projected prevalence to approach 18 million by 2022. Women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer represent the two largest groups of cancer survivors, accounting for 22% and 20% of the population respectively. Sixty- four percent of cancer survivors have survived 5 years or more; 40% have survived 10 years or more; and 15% have survived 20 years or more after diagnosis. Over the next decade, the number of people who have lived 5 years or more after their cancer diagnosis is projected to increase approximately 37% to 11.9 million. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 19 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  20. 20. Cancer Survivors in the United States: Prevalence across the Survivorship Trajectory and Implications for Care MedicalResearch.com Interview with Janet S. de Moor, PhD, MPH Program Director, Office of Cancer Survivorship Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD 20891-8336 (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. de Moor: Over the next decade, the number of cancer survivors is projected to increase as a result of increasing cancer incidence rates associated with the aging of the population and improvements in long-term survival rates. The largest group of survivors, currently and moving forward, are those who are 5 years are more from diagnosis. This growing cohort of cancer survivors presents a significant challenge to the health care system. This is especially true given that most survivors can now expect to live longer after diagnosis and often have complex needs stemming from chronic and late effects of treatment as well as co-morbid diseases. Over the next decade, a coordinated agenda for research and practice is needed to better understand and address the medical, psychosocial, and practical needs of cancer survivors from the point of diagnosis forward. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 20 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  21. 21. Cancer Survivors in the United States: Prevalence across the Survivorship Trajectory and Implications for Care MedicalResearch.com Interview with Janet S. de Moor, PhD, MPH Program Director, Office of Cancer Survivorship Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD 20891-8336 (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Dr. de Moor: A multi-pronged approach is essential to address the diverse and evolving needs of cancer survivors. Efforts are needed to identify effective and efficient models for delivering long-term follow-up care; develop infrastructure to collect long-term clinical and patient-reported outcome data from survivors; harness health IT and other technologies that facilitate care coordination and improvement in survivors’ long-term health outcomes; address important knowledge gaps about long-term survivors; and improve integrative palliative care. Progress in these areas is critical to optimize the health and quality of life of all people diagnosed with cancer.• Citation:• Cancer Survivors in the United States: Prevalence across the Survivorship Trajectory and Implications for Care• Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Mar 27. [Epub ahead of print]• de Moor JS, Mariotto AB, Parry C, Alfano CM, Padgett L, Kent EE, Forsythe L, Scoppa S, Hachey M, Rowland JH. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 21 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  22. 22. The subjective–objective mismatch in sleep perception among those with insomnia and sleep apnea MedicalResearch.com Interview with Matt T. Bianchi MD PhD MMSc Assistant Professor Department of Neurology Director, Sleep Division Massachusetts General Hospital• MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. Bianchi: We showed that patients reporting symptoms of insomnia tend to under-estimate the amount of time they slept during overnight sleep testing in our clinical sleep laboratory. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?• Dr. Bianchi: It has been known for decades that many patients with insomnia exhibit so-called “misperception” of sleep: that is, they feel awake despite objective evidence by electro-encephalogram that they are in fact asleep. What was surprising in our study was that this tendency was not related to the quality of sleep. We expected that patients with very light or interrupted sleep would tend to show this misperception, but this was not the case. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 22 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  23. 23. The subjective–objective mismatch in sleep perception among those with insomnia and sleep apnea MedicalResearch.com Interview with Matt T. Bianchi MD PhD MMSc Assistant Professor Department of Neurology Director, Sleep Division Massachusetts General Hospital (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. Bianchi: There is much to be learned about sleep misperception. Knowing whether we are awake or asleep during the night seems so natural and obvious that few patients (or clinicians) might question the reliability of that subjective sense.• However, misperception turns out to be common, and difficult to predict (there were in fact no predictors found in our study, despite extensive efforts). Where a patient with insomnia stands on the spectrum of (mis)perception of their own sleep is an important component of assessing the risk-benefit balance when it comes to insomnia drug therapy for example. Some patients may be reassured to know they are sleeping better than they think. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 23 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  24. 24. The subjective–objective mismatch in sleep perception among those with insomnia and sleep apnea MedicalResearch.com Interview with Matt T. Bianchi MD PhD MMSc Assistant Professor Department of Neurology Director, Sleep Division Massachusetts General Hospital (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Dr. Bianchi: There is an urgent need to understand misperception, and how this common finding impacts individual medical decisions (for example, about the need for medication for sleep). Also, much of what is written in the epidemiology literature is based on self-reported sleep durations – our study adds to the growing evidence that self-reported sleep durations may not match with objective data. Currently, in an epidemiology study linking short sleep durations to adverse health outcomes, the group who reports sleeping less than, say, 6 hours per night consists of individuals who have objectively short sleep, and those who have longer sleep but perceive it to be less. These subgroups should be teased apart in future studies, to improve our understanding of sleep-duration correlations in the literature.• Citation:• The subjective–objective mismatch in sleep perception among those with insomnia and sleep apnea• Bianchi MT, Williams KL, McKinney S, Ellenbogen JM.• Sleep Division, Neurology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.• J Sleep Res. 2013 Mar 25. doi: 10.1111/jsr.12046. [Epub ahead of print] For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 24 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  25. 25. Predictors of depression in breast cancer patients treated with radiation: Role of prior chemotherapy and nuclear factor kappa B MedicalResearch.com Interview with Mylin A. Torres, M.D. Assistant Professor Department of Radiation Oncology Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, GA 30322• MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. Torres: Radiation treatment for breast cancer is not associated with increased depressive symptoms, but of disease and treatment- related factors, prior chemotherapy treatment is a significant predictor of depression before and after radiation treatment. Prior chemotherapy treatment was associated with inflammatory mediators, including nuclear factor-kappa B DNA binding, soluble tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor 2, and interleukin-6, which predicted for depressive symptoms after radiation on univariate analysis.• MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?• Dr. Torres: It was surprising to find that radiation had no significant effect on depressive symptoms or fatigue. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 25 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  26. 26. Predictors of depression in breast cancer patients treated with radiation: Role of prior chemotherapy and nuclear factor kappa B MedicalResearch.com Interview with Mylin A. Torres, M.D. Assistant Professor Department of Radiation Oncology Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, GA 30322 (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. Torres: Breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy are at higher risk for developing depression and fatigue during and after treatment.• MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Dr. Torres: Longitudinal studies are warranted to investigate the relationship among prior chemotherapy, inflammation, and persistent depression after breast cancer treatment.• Citation:• Predictors of depression in breast cancer patients treated with radiation: Role of prior chemotherapy and nuclear factor kappa B• Torres MA, Pace TW, Liu T, Felger JC, Mister D, Doho GH, Kohn JN, Barsevick AM, Long Q, Miller AH.• Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.• Cancer. 2013 Mar 19. doi: 10.1002/cncr.28003. [Epub ahead of print] For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 26 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  27. 27. Adipocyte Fatty Acid storage factors enhance subcutaneous fat storage in postmenopausal women Dr. Sylvia Santosa, PhD Department of Exercise Science Concordia University Department of Exercise Science Montreal, Quebec, Canada H4B 1R6• MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. Santosa: Our results show that postmenopausal women burn less fat making more available to be stored. Our results also suggest that greater fat storage in postmenopausal women are likely to be attributed to changes in the pathways our fat cells use to store fat. We found that some of the proteins that help our fat cells store fat were more active and this greater activity corresponded with the amount of fat stored from our circulation. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?• Dr. Santosa: We thought that one of the main enzymes involved in breaking down fat for storage, lipoprotein lipase, would be a greater contributor to fat storage in postmenopausal women. Our results show that though lipoprotein lipase plays a role, it’s not as big a role as we thought. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 27 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  28. 28. Adipocyte Fatty Acid storage factors enhance subcutaneous fat storage in postmenopausal women Dr. Sylvia Santosa, PhD Department of Exercise Science Concordia University Department of Exercise Science Montreal, Quebec, Canada H4B 1R6 (cont)• MedicalResearch.com What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. Santosa: Our results indicate that female sex hormones have important effects on fat tissue storage and oxidation that likely promote fat gain after menopause.• MedicalResearch.com What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• We hope that future research is able to build on our results by delving further into the mechanisms by which sex steriods affect how and where we store fat.• Citation:• Adipocyte Fatty Acid storage factors enhance subcutaneous fat storage in postmenopausal women.• Santosa S, Jensen MD. Diabetes. 2013 Mar;62(3):775-82. doi: 10.2337/db12-0912. Epub 2012 Dec 3. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 28 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  29. 29. Relationship of Early-Onset Baldness to Prostate Cancer in African-American Men MEDICALRESEARCH.COM INTERVIEW WITH Charnita Zeigler-Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H. Research Assistant Professor CCEB University of Pennsylvania• MEDICALRESEARCH.COM: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. Zeigler-Johnson: The main findings of the study are:• Younger African-American men diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer at an early age (under the age of 60) are more likely to have had a personal history of early-onset baldness (baldness by age 30.)• For older patients, this is not necessarily the case, and future studies will need to focus on which factors place men in this age group at risk for prostate cancer. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 29 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  30. 30. Relationship of Early-Onset Baldness to Prostate Cancer in African-American Men MEDICALRESEARCH.COM INTERVIEW WITH Charnita Zeigler-Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H. Research Assistant Professor CCEB University of Pennsylvania (cont)• MEDICALRESEARCH.COM: Were any of the findings unexpected?• Dr. Zeigler-Johnson: We were surprised to find the association of early onset baldness and prostate cancer only in younger prostate cancer cases and in more advanced cases. Other studies have not typically considered the age at diagnosis or the stage and grade of disease in the outcome.• Frontal baldness rather than vertex (crown) balding was associated most strongly with advanced prostate cancer among younger African-American men. This is different from the vertex baldness association that has been reported among other studies with very few African-Americans.• MEDICALRESEARCH.COM: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. Zeigler-Johnson: Our study findings suggest to clinicians and patients that early baldness may one day be a clinical indicator of increased risk for prostate cancer. In other words, men that experience baldness at an early age may also have a predisposition for developing prostate cancer because of certain male hormones that are common in both baldness and prostate cancer progression. However, these findings need to be confirmed by other studies so that we can be certain of the relationship that we observed in this study which was the first study to focus exclusively on this relationship in African-American men. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 30 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  31. 31. Relationship of Early-Onset Baldness to Prostate Cancer in African-American Men MEDICALRESEARCH.COM INTERVIEW WITH Charnita Zeigler-Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H. Research Assistant Professor CCEB University of Pennsylvania (cont)• MEDICALRESEARCH.COM: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Dr. Zeigler-Johnson: Recommendations for future research include confirming these results with other populations of high risk patients (including other populations of African descent), determining if early onset baldness is associated with other prostate cancer outcomes, and understanding more about the biological link between baldness and prostate cancer.• Citation:• Relationship of Early-Onset Baldness to Prostate Cancer in African- American Men• Charnita Zeigler-Johnson, Knashawn H. Morales, Elaine Spangler, Bao-Li Chang, and Timothy R. Rebbeck Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers PrevPublished OnlineFirst March 26, 2013; doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-0944 For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 31 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  32. 32. Genetic factors in evolution of sleep length – a longitudinal twin study in Finnish adults MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Christer Hublin – Assistant Chief Medical Officer, Docent (Adjunct Professor) in Neurology (Helsinki University) Sleep medicine specialist (NOSMAC/ESRS) Finnish Institute of Occupational Health FIN-00250 Helsinki Finland• MedicalResearch.com What are the main findings of the study?• Answer: We found in an adult twin cohort (the Finnish Twin Cohort) that the proportion of variance in sleep length accounted for by genetic effects was relatively low (about one third) but stable (correlation 0.76 over a period of 15 years.). In contrast, the proportion of variance accounted for by environmental effects was high (about 0.7) and these effects were less stable (correlation over the time period 0.18). The proportion of short sleepers was more than doubled in both genders, whereas in the proportion of long sleepers no major change was seen during the follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal study providing data on the contribution of genetic factors to stability and change of sleep length over time. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 32 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  33. 33. Genetic factors in evolution of sleep length – a longitudinal twin study in Finnish adults MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Christer Hublin – Assistant Chief Medical Officer, Docent (Adjunct Professor) in Neurology (Helsinki University) Sleep medicine specialist (NOSMAC/ESRS) Finnish Institute of Occupational Health FIN-00250 Helsinki Finland (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?• Answer: There was considerable change in sleep length over the 15 year period as indicated by the relatively low correlation of sleep length (0.34) between 1975 and 1990. During the last decades, many studies have been published showing a significant (in many cases U-shaped) association between sleep length and several health outcomes, usually with the smallest risk in those sleeping around 7 hours. It is interesting to speculate what other possible factors are reflected in the association between sleep length and the health outcomes, as the stability of sleep length seems to be quite low. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 33 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  34. 34. Genetic factors in evolution of sleep length – a longitudinal twin study in Finnish adults MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Christer Hublin – Assistant Chief Medical Officer, Docent (Adjunct Professor) in Neurology (Helsinki University) Sleep medicine specialist (NOSMAC/ESRS) Finnish Institute of Occupational Health FIN-00250 Helsinki Finland (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Answer: Environmental factors have relative high effects with low stability over time, which would suggest that there are major external effects on sleep length. In clinical a context this would indicate that there are good possibilities for effective treatments for those suffering from short sleep, for example insomnia – one major subgroup among short sleepers. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 34 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  35. 35. Genetic factors in evolution of sleep length – a longitudinal twin study in Finnish adults MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Christer Hublin – Assistant Chief Medical Officer, Docent (Adjunct Professor) in Neurology (Helsinki University) Sleep medicine specialist (NOSMAC/ESRS) Finnish Institute of Occupational Health FIN-00250 Helsinki Finland (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Answer: Multiple measures are a more robust basis for genetic analyses than a single cross-sectional measure when studying the evolution of sleep length. It would be of interest to investigate whether stable or variable sleep length is important in predicting different health outcomes given that genetic factors underlie much of the stability. It is possible that the genetic factor underlying sleep length stability may also be of importance in the outcomes of interest.• Citation:• Genetic factors in evolution of sleep length – a longitudinal twin study in Finnish adults.• Hublin C, Partinen M, Koskenvuo M, Kaprio J. Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. J Sleep Res. 2013 Mar 20. doi: 10.1111/jsr.12051. [Epub ahead of print] For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 35 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  36. 36. Independent associations between fatty acids and sleep quality among obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. MedicalResearch.com Interview with Dr. Christopher Papandreou Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Medical School University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.• MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. Papandreou: Certain adipose tissue fatty acids measured in the gluteal site were found to be associated with sleep quality parameters in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome after controlling for possible confounders.• More specifically:• Saturated fatty acids were positively related to total sleep time, sleep efficiency and rapid eye movement in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.• Polyunsaturated fatty acids were positively associated with sleep efficiency and rapid eye movement.• N-3 fatty acids were positively associated with sleep efficiency, slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 36 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  37. 37. Independent associations between fatty acids and sleep quality among obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. MedicalResearch.com Interview with Dr. Christopher Papandreou Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Medical School University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece. (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. Papandreou First of all, the clinical application of the study’s data may be valid only for patients with similar characteristics to those in the population studied.• The aforementioned adipose tissue fatty acids measured in the gluteal site would have acted as precursors for sleep-inducing substances that in turn may have signaled in the brain to impact sleep quality. Clinicians should take into consideration the importance of these fatty acids in sleep quality beyond the syndrome itself and depression that is often diagnosed in these patients. Since gluteal adipose tissue is considered a reliable measure of long-term dietary fat intake it would be important to provide this information to the patients in order to change their dietary fatty acids intake in the frame of a healthy diet. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 37 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  38. 38. Independent associations between fatty acids and sleep quality among obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. MedicalResearch.com Interview with Dr. Christopher Papandreou Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Medical School University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece. (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Dr. Papandreou A randomized controlled trial causing a change in the fatty acid content of the gluteal adipose tissue via a modification in the dietary fat intake would be examined in relation to sleep quality in order to shed more light on this issue.• Citation:• Independent associations between fatty acids and sleep quality among obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.• Papandreou C. Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece. J Sleep Res. 2013 Feb 25. doi: 10.1111/jsr.12043. [Epub ahead of print] For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 38 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  39. 39. Novel Susceptibility Variants at 10p12.31-12.2 for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Ethnically Diverse Populations MedicalResearch.com Author Interview: Jun J. Yang, Ph.D. Assistant Member Dept. of Pharm. Sci. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital 262 Danny Thomas Pl., MS313 Memphis, TN 38105• MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. Yang: We performed a comprehensive survey of inherited genetic variations for their contribution to the susceptibility of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common cancer in children. This is by far the largest study of its kind (in terms of the number of subjects involved), and also the first one to include multi-ethnic populations. We identified 4 genomic loci related to the predisposition to ALL, 2 of which contributed to racial differences in the incidence of ALL. This study provided unequivocal evidence for inherited susceptibility of childhood ALL and pointed to novel biology of the pathogenesis of this disease. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 39 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  40. 40. Novel Susceptibility Variants at 10p12.31-12.2 for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Ethnically Diverse Populations MedicalResearch.com Author Interview: Jun J. Yang, Ph.D. Assistant Member Dept. of Pharm. Sci. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital 262 Danny Thomas Pl., MS313 Memphis, TN 38105 (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?• Dr. Yang: The racial differences in ALL susceptibility variants are somewhat surprising. But this was the first GWAS to include non- European populations, so we didn’t quite know what to expect.• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. Yang: To recognize the contribution of inherited risk of childhood ALL. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 40 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  41. 41. Novel Susceptibility Variants at 10p12.31-12.2 for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Ethnically Diverse Populations MedicalResearch.com Author Interview: Jun J. Yang, Ph.D. Assistant Member Dept. of Pharm. Sci. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital 262 Danny Thomas Pl., MS313 Memphis, TN 38105 (cont)• Dr. Yang: First of all, the role of inherited genetic variation is substantial in cancer pathogenesis and the interactions between germline and tumor genetic variations can be an very exciting new direction for cancer research.• Secondly, future genomic studies should strive to include more non-European subjects, not only to reduce the stark racial disparities but also to gain novel knowledge of cancer etiology in general..• Citation:• Novel Susceptibility Variants at 10p12.31-12.2 for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Ethnically Diverse Populations• J Natl Cancer Inst. 2013 Mar 19. [Epub ahead of print] For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 41 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  42. 42. Coupled Cognitive and Functional Change in Alzheimer’s Disease and the Influence of Depressive Symptoms MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Laura B. Zahodne, PhD Postdoctoral fellow in the cognitive neuroscience division in the Department of Neurology and the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain Columbia University Medical Center.• MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?• Dr. Zahodne: Having more depressive symptoms early on in Alzheimer’s disease was associated with more rapid declines in the ability to handle tasks of everyday living, and this relationship was independent of cognitive decline.• MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?• Dr. Zahodne: Previous studies have shown that depressive symptoms are associated with more difficulties with thinking and daily activities. This study additionally shows that depressive symptoms herald not only more rapid declines in thinking, but also daily functioning, over time. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 42 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  43. 43. Coupled Cognitive and Functional Change in Alzheimer’s Disease and the Influence of Depressive Symptoms MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Laura B. Zahodne, PhD Postdoctoral fellow in the cognitive neuroscience division in the Department of Neurology and the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain Columbia University Medical Center. (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?• Dr. Zahodne: Although these findings are observational, they could suggest that providing mental health treatment for people with Alzheimer’s disease might slow the loss of independence.• Additionally, when making a prognosis for an Alzheimer’s patient, clinicians should consider not only memory and thinking abilities, but also levels of depression, anxiety, and other psychological symptoms. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 43 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  44. 44. Coupled Cognitive and Functional Change in Alzheimer’s Disease and the Influence of Depressive Symptoms MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Laura B. Zahodne, PhD Postdoctoral fellow in the cognitive neuroscience division in the Department of Neurology and the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain Columbia University Medical Center. (cont)• MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?• Dr. Zahodne: Based on these findings, a question that should be explored in future research is whether intervention for depression can be demonstrated to slow cognitive decline, functional decline, and/or the progression of pathological changes in the brain.• Citation:• Coupled Cognitive and Functional Change in Alzheimer’s Disease and the Influence of Depressive Symptoms.• Zahodne LB, Devanand D, Stern Y.• Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Department of Neurology and Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and The Aging Brain, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. J Alzheimers Dis. 2013 Jan 8. [Epub ahead of print] For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 44 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  45. 45. MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Author interviews Editor: Marie Benz, MD info@hemodialysis.com April 3 2013 For Informational Purposes Only: Not for Specific Medical Advice. For Informational Purposes Only.4/3/13 45 Not for Specific Medical Advice.
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