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Smoking Cessation and Electronic Cigarettes
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Chris Bullen MBChB MPH PhD FAFPM FNZCP...
Smoking Cessation and Electronic Cigarettes
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Chris Bullen MBChB MPH PhD FAFPM FNZCP...
Breast Cancer: Two Years vs One of Adjuvant Rastuzumab
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Prof Aron Goldhirsch
Department...
Breast Cancer: Three vs Five Week Post-Operative Radiotherapy
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Prof John R Yarnold
Divi...
Pregnancy: Midwife vs Standard Maternity Care Study
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Prof Sally K Tracy DMid
Midwifery ...
Pregnancy: Midwife vs Standard Maternity Care Study
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Prof Sally K Tracy DMid
Midwifery ...
Pregnancy: Midwife vs Standard Maternity Care Study
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Prof Sally K Tracy DMid
Midwifery ...
Pregnancy: Midwife vs Standard Maternity Care Study
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Prof Sally K Tracy DMid
Midwifery ...
Sleep Apnea: CPAP Treatment and Golf Performance
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Marc L. Benton, MD, FCCP, FAASM
Morri...
Sleep Apnea: CPAP Treatment and Golf Performance
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Marc L. Benton, MD, FCCP, FAASM
Morri...
Parkinson’s Disease: Cognitive Impairment and Plasma Ceramides
MedicalResearch.com: Interview with:
Michelle M. Mielke, Ph...
Lung Cancer: New Plasma Biomarker for Non-Small Cell Cancer
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Jie He, PhD, MD
Director, ...
Cognitive Impairment and Hospital Readmissions
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Mark W. Ketterer, PhD, ABPP Senior Bios...
Cancer Screening Trials: Weighing the Harms
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Bruno Heleno, PhD fellow
Research Unit for...
Colon Cancer: Screening and Mortality
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Aasma Shaukat, M.D., M.P.H.
Dept. of Medicine
GI...
OCD: Adding Cognitive Therapy to SSIs
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
H. Blair Simpson, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Clini...
OCD: Adding Cognitive Therapy to SSIs
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
H. Blair Simpson, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Clini...
Addiction: Does Chronic Care Management Improve Outcomes?
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Richard Saitz, MD MPH
Profes...
Addiction: Does Chronic Care Management Improve Outcomes?
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Richard Saitz, MD MPH
Profes...
Spine Pain Patients: Prevalence of Fibromyalgia in Tertiary Pain Clinic
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Chad M. Brumme...
Urinary Catheter Infections: Clinical Assessment vs National Safety Network Definition
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:...
Urinary Catheter Infections: Clinical Assessment vs National Safety Network Definition
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:...
Urinary Catheter Infections: Clinical Assessment vs National Safety Network Definition
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:...
Unhealthy Aging and Chronic Inflammation
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Tasnime Akbaraly PhD
Institut National de la ...
Unhealthy Aging and Chronic Inflammation
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Tasnime Akbaraly PhD
Institut National de la ...
Unhealthy Aging and Chronic Inflammation
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Tasnime Akbaraly PhD
Institut National de la ...
Diabetes: Increased Mortality Risk in Regardless of Race or Ethnicity
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Yunsheng Ma ...
Diabetes: Increased Mortality Risk in Regardless of Race or Ethnicity
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Yunsheng Ma ...
Obesity: Low Childhood IQ Raises Risk of Midlife Obesity and Late-Life Dementia
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Daniel...
Obesity: Low Childhood IQ Raises Risk of Midlife Obesity and Late-Life Dementia
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Daniel...
MRIs of the Knee: How big a role is doctor’s financial stake?
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Matthew P. Lungren, MD
D...
MRIs of the Knee: How big a role is doctor’s financial stake?
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Matthew P. Lungren, MD
D...
Pediatrics: Psychosomatic Problems in Bullied Children
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Gianluca Gini, PhD and Tiziana ...
Pediatrics: Psychosomatic Problems in Bullied Children
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Gianluca Gini, PhD and Tiziana ...
Dementia: Lewy Body vs Parkinson’s Disease
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Rodolfo Savica, MD, MSc
Department of Neuro...
Dementia: Lewy Body vs Parkinson’s Disease
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Rodolfo Savica, MD, MSc
Department of Neuro...
Social Isolation Linked to Mortality
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Matthew S. Pantell, MD, MS
Department of Pediatri...
Social Isolation Linked to Mortality
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Matthew S. Pantell, MD, MS
Department of Pediatri...
Adolescents: Bending the Obesity Curve
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ronald J. Iannotti, PhD
Prevention Research Bra...
Adolescents: Bending the Obesity Curve
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ronald J. Iannotti, PhD
Prevention Research Bra...
Stroke Risk: Increased Risk with Intraplaque Carotid Artery Hemorrhage
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Tobias Saam, MD...
Stroke Risk: Increased Risk with Intraplaque Carotid Artery Hemorrhage
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Tobias Saam, MD...
Breast Cancer in Young Women: Decisions that Affect Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy
MedicalResearch.com Interview wi...
Breast Cancer in Young Women: Decisions that Affect Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy
MedicalResearch.com Interview wi...
Melanoma: PDK1 Kinase Required for Development and Metastasis
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ze’ev Ronai, Ph.D.
Profe...
Melanoma: PDK1 Kinase Required for Development and Metastasis
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ze’ev Ronai, Ph.D.
Profe...
Opiod Prescriptions: Marked Increase in 10 Year Period
Matthew Daubresse, MHS
Research Data Analyst
Center for Drug Safety...
Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: On-Pump vs Off-Pump Trends and Mortality
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Faisal G. Ba...
Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: On-Pump vs Off-Pump Trends and Mortality
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Faisal G. Ba...
Dental Caries and Head and Neck Cancer
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Mine Tezal, DDS, PhD
Oral Biology University at...
Dental Caries and Head and Neck Cancer
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Mine Tezal, DDS, PhD
Oral Biology University at...
Hypertension Control: Financial Incentives Effects
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Laura A. Petersen, MD, MPH
MEDVAMC ...
Hypertension Control: Financial Incentives Effects
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Laura A. Petersen, MD, MPH
MEDVAMC ...
Atrial fibrillation: Surgical and Transcatheter Ablation
MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Elisa Ebrille, MD
Department ...
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review
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MedicalResearch.com - Medical Research Interviews Week in Review

  1. 1. MedicalResearch.com Interviews on contemporary Medical Research with medical researchers from major and specialty medical journals. Editor: Marie Benz, MD info@medicalresearch.com September 25 2013 For Informational Purposes Only: Not for Specific Medical Advice.
  2. 2. Medical Disclaimer | Terms and Conditions • • • The contents of the MedicalResearch.com Site, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on the MedicalResearch.comm Site ("Content") are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on the MedicalResearch.com Site! If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. MedicalResearch.com does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Site. Reliance on any information provided by MedicalResearch.comm or other Eminent Domains Inc (EDI) websites, EDI employees, others appearing on the Site at the invitation of MedicalResearch.com or EDI, or other visitors to the Site is solely at your own risk. The Site may contain health- or medical-related materials that are sexually explicit. If you find these materials offensive, you may not want to use our Site. The Site and the Content are provided on an "as is" basis. Read more interviews on Hemodialysis.com
  3. 3. Smoking Cessation and Electronic Cigarettes MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Chris Bullen MBChB MPH PhD FAFPM FNZCPHM Director School of Population Health, The University of Auckland • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Bullen: E-cigarettes, with or without nicotine, were modestly effective at helping smokers to quit, with similar levels of abstinence as with nicotine patches, and few adverse events. At 6 months, verified abstinence was 7·3% with nicotine e-cigarettes, 5·8% with patches, and 4·1% with placebo e-cigarettes. However, there was insufficient statistical power to conclude superiority of nicotine e-cigarettes to patches or to placebo e-cigarettes. No significant differences in rates of adverse events occurrence were found between the groups. E-cigarettes were very popular throughout the trial, with almost 90% of users stating they would recommend them to a friend trying to quit smoking. • • • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Bullen: Smoking abstinence rates were lower than expected, for e-cigarettes in particular, but also for those in the patches group. High levels of continued use of e-cigarettes were found at 6 months, in participants allocated to ecigarette and those allocated to patches . Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  4. 4. Smoking Cessation and Electronic Cigarettes MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Chris Bullen MBChB MPH PhD FAFPM FNZCPHM Director School of Population Health, The University of Auckland • • • • • • • • • • • • • Dr. Bullen: E cigarettes are about as effective as nicotine patches for quitting, when used with minimal behavioural support. In the short term (3 to 6 months use) using e-cigarettes appears to be no more harmful than using nicotine patches. We have very limited data on longer term use of e-cigarettes, but such data as exists suggests the levels of toxins are far lower than in tobacco smoke (the only alternative to using e-cigarettes for many people) so there is little doubt they are a less harmful option than continuing to smoke. They may be considered as an option for some people, who want to quit and stay abstinent, who have tried and failed to do so after trying standard NRTs and other evidence-based cessation medications. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Bullen: Long term follow up of users who use e-cigarettes for more than 6 months, to monitor adverse effects of long-term use and concurrent use of tobacco products. Further cessation and reduction trials of newer models of e-cigarettes that deliver nicotine more reliably and efficiently Studies of youth uptake of e-cigarettes as a pathway to tobacco use or nicotine dependence. Citation: Electronic cigarettes for smoking cessation: a randomised controlled trial Dr Christopher Bullen MBChB, Colin Howe PhD, Murray Laugesen MBChB, Hayden McRobbie ,MBChB, Varsha Parag MSc, Jonathan Williman PhD, Natalie Walker PhD, The Lancet, Early Online Publication, 9 September 2013 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  5. 5. Breast Cancer: Two Years vs One of Adjuvant Rastuzumab MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof Aron Goldhirsch Department of Medicine European Institute of Oncology Via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan, Italy • • • • • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Prof. Goldhirsch: Two years of adjuvant trastuzumab after standard chemotherapy is not more effective than is 1 year of treatment with the drug for patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Prof. Goldhirsch: Hypothetically, the longer duration exposure to adjuvant trastuzumab was expected to yield a longer DFS, similarly to other targeted therapies, like endocrine therapy. MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Prof. Goldhirsch: 1 year of treatment provides a significant disease-free and overall survival benefit compared with observation (after adjuvant chemotherapy) and remains the standard of care. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Prof. Goldhirsch: There are several new efficacious drugs for HER2 disease, (TRASTUZUMAB EMTANSINE and PERTUZUMAB). An intelligent investigation of their role in the adjuvant setting, for the duration of one year, is a relevant task for clinical research in the field. Citation: 2 years versus 1 year of adjuvant trastuzumab for HER2-positive breast cancer (HERA): an open-label, randomised controlled trial Goldhirsch A, Gelber RD, Piccart-Gebhart MJ, de Azambuja E, Procter M, Suter TM, Jackisch C, Cameron D, Weber HA, Heinzmann D, Lago LD, McFadden E, Dowsett M, Untch M, Gianni L, Bell R, Köhne CH, Vindevoghel A, Andersson M, Brunt AM, Otero-Reyes D, Song S, Smith I, Leyland-Jones B, Baselga J; for the Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) Trial Study Team. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  6. 6. Breast Cancer: Three vs Five Week Post-Operative Radiotherapy MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof John R Yarnold Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT, UK • • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Prof. Yarnold: A 3-week schedule of curative post-operative radiotherapy for women with breast cancer involving 15 treatments (fractions) delivered Monday to Friday each week, is at least as safe and effective as historical schedules given over 5 or 6 weeks. In fact the 3-week schedule is gentler on the healthy tissues than earlier standard regimens. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Prof. Yarnold: The results were not unexpected, but confirm that the relationships between test and control schedules do not alter between 5 & 10yr. The larger number of events also make the conclusions more robust, statistically speaking. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Prof. Yarnold: We are testing 2 dose levels of a 1-week schedule against the 3-week schedule in a phase 3 trial in UK (FAST Forward Trial), and have entered about 2500 of the accrual target of 4000 patients. Citation: The UK Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy (START) Trial A of radiotherapy hypofractionation for treatment of early breast cancer: a randomised trial. START Trialists’ Group, Bentzen SM, Agrawal RK, Aird EG, Barrett JM, Barrett-Lee PJ, Bliss JM, Brown J, Dewar JA, Dobbs HJ, Haviland JS, Hoskin PJ, Hopwood P, Lawton PA, Magee BJ, Mills J, Morgan DA, Owen JR, Simmons S, Sumo G, Sydenham MA, Venables K, Yarnold JR. Lancet Oncol. 2008 Apr;9(4):331-41. doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(08)70077-9. Epub 2008 Mar 19. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  7. 7. Pregnancy: Midwife vs Standard Maternity Care Study MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof Sally K Tracy DMid Midwifery and Women’s Health Research Unit University of Sydney, Royal Hospital for Women Randwick, NSW, Australia • • • • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Prof. Tracy: We recruited 1748 pregnant women, of all risk types, from two tertiary teaching hospitals in different states in Australia and allocated them to receive either caseload midwifery care (871) or standard maternity care (877). The study found more women in caseload midwifery experienced an unassisted vaginal birth without pharmacological analgesia, and fewer women experienced an elective caesarean. While the trial findings did not show a statistically significant difference in the rate of caesarean sections between either group, the overall rate fell by more than 20 percent from pre-trial levels. Newborn infants in both groups achieved similar physical assessment scores (Apgar scores). A slightly lower number of preterm births and neonatal intensive care admissions among the midwifery caseload group was not statistically significant. Important secondary findings of the study include: 30 percent more spontaneous onset of labour less induction of labour less severe blood loss, and stronger likelihood of breastfeeding at discharge from hospital. These small differences accounted for an overall difference of AU$566.74 less with caseload midwifery than with standard care. Caseload midwifery appeared to alter some of the pathways that recurrently contribute to increased obstetric intervention. Having this level of continuity of care works on the assumption that women will labour more effectively, need to stay in hospital less time and feel a stronger sense of satisfaction and personal control if they have the opportunity to get to know their midwife at the beginning of pregnancy. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  8. 8. Pregnancy: Midwife vs Standard Maternity Care Study MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof Sally K Tracy DMid Midwifery and Women’s Health Research Unit University of Sydney, Royal Hospital for Women Randwick, NSW, Australia • • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Prof. Tracy: This was the first randomised trial confirming that caseload midwifery care is feasible for women of all risk and cost effective at all levels of care. Given the limited information available about the cost of maternity services in Australia, it’s significant to find that caseload midwifery produces a saving of $566.74 for each woman who gave birth in the public hospital. It refutes the common misconception that one-to-one caseload midwifery care was expensive. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  9. 9. Pregnancy: Midwife vs Standard Maternity Care Study MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof Sally K Tracy DMid Midwifery and Women’s Health Research Unit University of Sydney, Royal Hospital for Women Randwick, NSW, Australia • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Prof. Tracy: The study found that continued care from a named midwife throughout pregnancy, birth, and after the baby is born (caseload midwifery) is just as safe as standard maternity care (shared between rostered midwives, and medical practitioners in discrete wards or clinics) for all women irrespective of risk, and is significantly cheaper. Caseload midwifery care has been largely overlooked because of the incorrect belief that the service will be too expensive and that the model is not safe for complex pregnancies. Our randomised trial showed that caseload care can achieve similar outcomes to standard care – and it costs the public purse significantly less. The perception that this is a ‘boutique’ service that will cost far too much is incorrect. The midwife is making much better use of her time in responding to the needs of each woman as she is needed – rather than clocking up her 40 hours rostered in a ward or clinic regardless of whether there are women coming though the system at that time. Baby’s have a habit of arriving unexpectedly – and if a woman is booked with a caseload midwife in a small Midwifery group practice – her midwife will be ready to be with her in labour whenever she begins the labour process. In addition to this the study should dispel the confusion around the notion that having a caseload midwife means that women will not necessarily get to see a doctor if they need to. Having a caseload midwife means that a woman with a complex pregnancy not only has individualised midwifery care with a midwife whom she has grown to trust, but the collaboration between her midwife and an obstetrician who is also part of the team or formally connected as a consultant to the small group practice, means that the lines of communication between midwives and obstetricians have the potential to be further enhanced. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  10. 10. Pregnancy: Midwife vs Standard Maternity Care Study MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof Sally K Tracy DMid Midwifery and Women’s Health Research Unit University of Sydney, Royal Hospital for Women Randwick, NSW, Australia • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Prof. Tracy: Further study should examine the interface between the ‘core’ rostered midwives employed by the hospital and the caseload midwife coming in and out of the hospital and community to ascertain how to achieve optimum continuity? We should also look at what is the optimal time for going home and receiving postnatal care – how many visits – of for how many weeks after giving birth? And there could be further work in ascertaining what a sustainable caseload is – 35- 40 women per year? Although we have survey data from 36 weeks during pregnancy and up to 6 months post birth recording the self assessed health status and the experience of the women, it would be very useful to have long term data on the infant and mother wellbeing. Also, given the success of the collaborative effort between obstetricians and midwives in this study it would be useful to research new ways of sharing education and training within this caseload model of care. Citation: Caseload midwifery care versus standard maternity care for women of any risk: M@NGO, a randomised controlled trial Prof Sally K Tracy DMid,Donna L Hartz PhD,Mark B Tracy FRACP,Jyai Allen BMid,Amanda Forti RM,Bev Hall MIPH,Jan White RM,Anne Lainchbury MMid,Helen Stapleton PhD,Michael Beckmann FRANZCOG,Andrew Bisits FRANZCOG,Prof Caroline Homer PhD,Prof Maralyn Foureur PhD,Alec Welsh FRANZCOG,Prof Sue Kildea PhD The Lancet – 17 September 2013 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)61406-3 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  11. 11. Sleep Apnea: CPAP Treatment and Golf Performance MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Marc L. Benton, MD, FCCP, FAASM Morristown Medical Center and Atlantic Sleep & Pulmonary Associates, Madison, NJ 07940 • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Benton: When compared to a group of matched controls, 12 male golfers who had moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) demonstrated statistically significant improvement in their ability to play golf (as measured by changes in the Handicap Index, the standardized indicator of golfing performance) after undergoing CPAP treatment for their condition. Treatment adherence among the group placed on CPAP was unusually high. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Benton: The degree of improvement was most substantial in the better (and usually older) golfers. We originally expected to see the largest improvement among those who were younger with the highest handicaps (and therefore the most room for improvement). In retrospect, however, the better golfers have done a better job of managing the technical and mechanical aspects of golf, and with the cognitive enhancement afforded by successful treatment of their OSAS, they saw measurable improvement early and more significantly than those who were less-skilled. Additionally, we did not expect that the golfers whom we enrolled with OSAS to be essentially fully compliant with their CPAP. Improvement in golf performance appeared to be a strong motivator for our treatment group, many of whom had already failed attempts to use CPAP and in a few cases to even get them to undergo diagnostic sleep studies. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  12. 12. Sleep Apnea: CPAP Treatment and Golf Performance MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Marc L. Benton, MD, FCCP, FAASM Morristown Medical Center and Atlantic Sleep & Pulmonary Associates, Madison, NJ 07940 • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Benton: Improvement in a number of medical conditions has been well-documented when CPAP has been successfully offered to selected patients. Similarly, reduced accident rates are noted in commercial drivers with OSAS once treatment has been provided. Improvement in isolated psychometric performance tests also occurs in treated sleep apnea. Golf is a commonly-played sport that incorporates many levels of integrated cognitive and physical functions. If CPAP treatment of OSAS results in measurable improvement in the ability of golfers to perform, it is possible that golf can be seen as a surrogate for other forms of activity where we cannot accurately measure performance improvement – such as our jobs and our day-to-day activities in our social and family environments. Making this connection might help motivate selected patients to seek and/or be compliant with treatment who might otherwise not be interested (especially given the mediocre levels of treatment adherence commonly observed in the treatment of OSAS). Furthermore, the concept that mainstream and beneficial medical therapy (not just for OSAS) can secondarily improve performance in golf and possibly other sports/recreational activities further expands the opportunities for healthcare providers to be successful in our efforts to engage our patients in efforts to improve their health proactively. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Benton: A study similar to this pilot needs to be done with more participants and better-defined control groups to more clearly define the impact that treating sleep apnea has on golf performance. My expectations, based on a number of factors, is that the impact of treatment is underestimated in this study. It would then be interesting to design future studies to look at the treatment of OSAS and possibly other common medical conditions (asthma probably being the easiest one) and the impact on other sports, activities, and behaviors where performance can be assessed. Citation: Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome with Nasal Positive Airway Pressure Improves Golf Performance. The Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine Marc L. Benton, MD, FCCP, FAASM; Neil S. Friedman, RN, RPSGT Accepted: 9/9/2013 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  13. 13. Parkinson’s Disease: Cognitive Impairment and Plasma Ceramides MedicalResearch.com: Interview with: Michelle M. Mielke, Ph.D. Associate Professor Department of Health Sciences Research Division of Epidemiology Mayo Clinic 200 First Street SW Rochester, MN 55905 • • • • • • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Mielke: Among Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients, plasma levels of ceramides and monohexylceramides were higher in patients with cognitive impairment or dementia compared to patients who were cognitively normal. Levels of these lipids were also higher in the combined group of PD patients compared to non-PD controls but the number of controls were small. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Mielke: Previous studies have not examined plasma levels of ceramides and glucosylceramides in PD patients. We hypothesized that plasma levels of ceramides and monohexylceramides would be altered in PD patients and associated with worse cognition, but we did not expect some of the associations to be as strong as they were. MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Mielke: There are currently no biomarkers to predict who will develop sporadic PD, or cognitive impairment in patients with PD. The present findings suggest that plasma ceramide and monohexylceramides could be indicators of who will develop cognitive impairment. This pathway should be examined as a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of, or slowing of, Parkinson’s disease progression. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Mielke: As this is really the first look at these plasma lipids, there is a lot of work to be done. Future studies will use additional mass spectrometry techniques to separate monohexylceramides into glucosylceramides and galactosylceramides. This is important as the findings are likely driven by glucosylceramides and could be an even stronger predictor when quantified separately. Longitudinal studies of PD patients are also ongoing to determine whether these lipids can predict who will develop dementia and the rate of cognitive decline. Citation: Plasma Ceramide and Glucosylceramide Metabolism Is Altered in Sporadic Parkinson’s Disease and Associated with Cognitive Impairment: A Pilot Study Michelle M. Mielke, Walter Maetzler, Norman J. Haughey, Veera V. R. Bandaru, Rodolfo Savica, Christian Deuschle, Thomas Gasser, Ann-Kathrin Hauser, Susanne Gräber-Sultan, Erwin Schleicher, Daniela Berg, Inga Liepelt-Scarfone Research Article | published 18 Sep 2013 | PLOS ONE 10.1371/journal.pone.0073094 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  14. 14. Lung Cancer: New Plasma Biomarker for Non-Small Cell Cancer MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jie He, PhD, MD Director, Laboratory of Thoracic Surgery President, Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100021 • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Jie He: The main findings of the study is that we have identified IDH1 as an effective plasma biomarker for the diagnosis of NSCLCs, particularly with high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma. • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Jie He: Yes, we feel a little surprised to see the results can be validated so good. So we are planning to conduct multicenter screenings to further validate the results. MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Jie He: We have identified IDH1 as a new diagnositc marker for lung cancer, with a good proteintial to be used for noninvasive early diagnosis of lung cancer. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Jie He: We are planning to conduct an independent cohort of patients for further validation. And it is necessary to determine whether plasma IDH1 can be used as a specific biomarker for NSCLCs against other cancers. Moreover, it is also necessary to study the molecular mechanism and clinical implications of IDH1 up regulation. Citation: Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 Is a Novel Plasma Biomarker for the Diagnosis of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Nan Sun, Zhaoli Chen, Fengwei Tan, Baihua Zhang, Ran Yao, Chengcheng Zhou, Jiagen Li, Yibo Gao, Ziyuan Liu, Xiaogang Tan, Fang Zhou, Max Y.f He, Kang Shao, Ning Li, Bin Qiu, Jian Sun, Yue Yu, Suya Wang, Yuda Zhao, Xuejiao Shi, and Jie He. Dehydrogenase 1 Is a Novel Plasma Biomarker for the Diagnosis of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer. Clinical Cancer Research, September 2013 DOI: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-004 • • • • • • • Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  15. 15. Cognitive Impairment and Hospital Readmissions MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Mark W. Ketterer, PhD, ABPP Senior Bioscientific Staff Henry Ford Hospital/A2 Detroit, MI 48202 Clinical Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Neurosciences Department of Psychiatry Wayne State University • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study: Dr. Ketterer: A survey of 84 patients admitted to Henry Ford Hospital found 54% to have Moderate-Severe Cognitive Impairment (CI). • • MedicalResearch.com: Where any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Ketterer: The prevalence rate of CI in this sample was approximately three times higher than anticipated, and was the most potent predictor of readmission within 30 days. Discussion of the causes of readmission rarely mention CI despite the fact that it interferes with pill-taking, dietary restrictions, early symptom concern/reaction and prescription renewal. A history of treatment for emotional distress was also a predictor of 30 day readmissions. MedicalResearch.com: What should patients and providers take away from this report? Dr. Ketterer: CI has been found to affect not only healthcare utilization, but also Mortality. Greater awareness and education of cohabiting family, and more reliable med supervision may avoid recurrent medical crises causing readmission and deaths. MedicalResearch.com: What further research do you recommend as a result of your report? Dr. Ketterer: Intervention studies need to test the hypothesis that family behavior can be altered to improve adherence. Some innovative technologies may also be available to improve med adherence. Citation: Behavioral Factors and Hospital Admissions/Readmissions in Patients With CHF Mark W. Ketterer, Ph.D., Cathy Draus, R.N., James McCord, M.D., Usamah Mossallam, M.D., Michael Hudson, M.D. Psychosomatics, Available online 7 September 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2013.06.019 Available online 7 September 2013 • • • • • • • • Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  16. 16. Cancer Screening Trials: Weighing the Harms MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Bruno Heleno, PhD fellow Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, PO Box 2099, 1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark • • • MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Bruno Heleno, PhD fellow Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, PO Box 2099, 1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: In a literature review of cancer screening trials of a wide range of screening interventions, we found that trials seldom report the information necessary to weigh benefits against harms. • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Answer: Overdiagnosis was reported in 7% of 57 cancer screening trials. False-positives were reported for both trial arms in 4% of the trials, and they were reported for at least the screened arms in 18% of the trials. These are the harms more directly related with screening; yet, according to our criteria, they were reported in a minority of trials. MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Answer: We found that the harms of screening were poorly reported in randomized trials, the study design that can provide the best quality evidence of the effects of screenings. Healthcare decision makers, healthcare practitioners, and, ultimately, patients therefore cannot make informed choices about cancer screening as the information about benefits is more readily available and likely to be of higher quality than the information about harms. This is problematic as many cancer screening programs have important associated harms. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Answer: Researchers, ethical committees with responsibility about trials, and funders need to reflect and agree on which is the minimal information about harms that should be reported for every upcoming trial of cancer screening. This will bring transparency and will help provide the evidence required for informed decision making. Citation: Quantification of harms in cancer screening trials: literature review Heleno B ,Thomsen MF ,Rodrigues DS ,Jørgensen KJ ,Brodersen J. Quantification of harms in cancer screening trials: literature review. BMJ 2013;347:f5334 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  17. 17. Colon Cancer: Screening and Mortality MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Aasma Shaukat, M.D., M.P.H. Dept. of Medicine GI Division, MMC 36 University of Minnesota Minneapolis, MN 55455 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Shaukat: The study showed that screening for colon cancer using stool cards consistently reduces risk of death from colon cancer by one-third through thirty years. The benefit of screening in larger in men compared to women, and for women the benefit seems to start at age 60. However, screening did not make people live longer. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Shaukat: The continued reduction in risk of death from colon cancer out to 30 years is remarkable, and suggests that taking out benign polyps may provide long lasting protection against colon cancer. MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Shaukat: Screening for colon cancer reduces risk of death from colon cancer. Our study emphasizes the importance of screening for colon cancer. The best screening test is not known at this time. In the meantime, every clinician and patient should be having a conversation about which test is best for them, based on risks and benefits. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Shaukat: We are participating in an ongoing study comparing colonoscopy versus stool cards through the Veterans Affairs Medical center that might tell us which test is best. Results will be available in 10 years. We also need to study the benefit of screening in women 50-60 more closely. Citation: Long-Term Mortality after Screening for Colorectal Cancer Aasma Shaukat, M.D., M.P.H., Steven J. Mongin, M.S., Mindy S. Geisser, M.S., Frank A. Lederle, M.D., John H. Bond, M.D., Jack S. Mandel, Ph.D., M.P.H., and Timothy R. Church, Ph.D. N Engl J Med 2013; 369:1106-1114 September 19, 2013 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1300720 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  18. 18. OCD: Adding Cognitive Therapy to SSIs MedicalResearch.com Interview with: H. Blair Simpson, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University Director of the Anxiety Disorders Clinic and the Center for OCD and Related Disorders at the New York State Psychiatric Institute New York, NY 10032 • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Simpson: This is the first RCT to compare two recommended SRI augmentation strategies for adults with OCD. Adding EX/RP to SRIs was superior to risperidone and to pill placebo in reducing OCD symptoms and improving insight, functioning, and quality of life. Risperidone was not superior to placebo on any outcome. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Simpson: Contrary to our expectations, adding EX/RP (a type of cognitive-behavioral therapy called Exposure and Response Prevention) to SRIs was superior to adding risperidone on every outcome. These findings are important because antipsychotics are increasingly prescribed to OCD outpatients, and risperidone is recommended as the medication of first choice to augment SRI response. Our results call for increased use of EX/RP for augmenting unsatisfactory SRI effects. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  19. 19. OCD: Adding Cognitive Therapy to SSIs MedicalResearch.com Interview with: H. Blair Simpson, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University Director of the Anxiety Disorders Clinic and the Center for OCD and Related Disorders at the New York State Psychiatric Institute New York, NY 10032 • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Simpson: OCD patients on SRIs should be offered EX/RP before antipsychotics given EX/RP’s superior efficacy and less negative side effect profile. Identifying who achieves minimal OCD symptoms from adding EX/RP to SRIs and whether such patients can then successfully discontinue their SRI warrants future research. Whether OCD patients on SRIs who fail to respond to EX/RP (or are unwilling to try it) can benefit from risperidone augmentation remains an unanswered question. Alternative medication augmentation strategies for OCD patients on SRIs are needed. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Simpson: We are now funded by NIMH to study whether patients who become well after the combination of SRIs and EX/RP can maintain their wellness if the SRI is discontinued. The study is described in more detail at www.ocdtreatmentstudy.com We are also developing novel treatment strategies for patients who do not become well from the combination of SRIs and EX/RP. Our current work is described on our website at www.columbiaocd.org Citation: Simpson H, Foa EB, Liebowitz MR, et al. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy vs Risperidone for Augmenting Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2013;():-. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.1932. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  20. 20. Addiction: Does Chronic Care Management Improve Outcomes? MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Richard Saitz, MD MPH Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Saitz: Chronic care management in primary care did not improve health outcomes (abstinence from cocaine, opioids or heavy drinking; or any other clinical outcomes, like addiction consequences, emergency or hospital use, health-related quality of life, addiction severity) for people with alcohol or other drug dependence. • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Saitz: Yes. Since addiction is a chronic disease, chronic care management (CCM), that has been successful for other chronic medical (like asthma, heart failure, diabetes) and chronic mental health conditions (tobacco dependence, depression) should have improved outcomes. The surprising findings have several possible explanations. It may be that addiction treatments are just not effective enough across the spectrum of disease (even though for some specific subgroups they may be very effective, like pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence in people who want treatment). Another possibility is that there could be other ways of implementing disease management. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  21. 21. Addiction: Does Chronic Care Management Improve Outcomes? MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Richard Saitz, MD MPH Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Saitz: The take home message is that although addiction needs to be addressed in primary care setting and it has to be addressed in a multidisciplinary way and longitudinally, just applying CCM may not result in the improved outcomes one might expect. The concept of CCM is likely sound but needs more work to make sure it will be effective for people with addictions. In general the big take home is that CCM, which has been looked to improve quality and outcomes and reduce cost of care, should not be assumed to be effective without testing it. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Saitz: Research should test CCM for more specific substance use disorders (just as CCM doesn’t get applied to the vast spectrum of “heart disease,” rather it gets applied, successfully, to patients with symptomatic heart failure of a particular severity level). For example, CCM might be tested for patients with opioid dependence interested in pharmacotherapy treatment. In addition, it would make sense to test different ways of implementing CCM (like more specific care pathways or less specific; or more integration with primary care clinician teams or less; enrolling more or less severe patients) as some features may be more critical to success than others. Citation: Saitz R, Cheng DM, Winter M, et al. Chronic Care Management for Dependence on Alcohol and Other Drugs: The AHEAD Randomized Trial. JAMA. 2013;310(11):1156-1167. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.277609. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  22. 22. Spine Pain Patients: Prevalence of Fibromyalgia in Tertiary Pain Clinic MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Chad M. Brummett, M.D. Assistant Professor, University of Michigan Health System Department of Anesthesiology Division of Pain Medicine Ann Arbor, MI 48109 • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Brummett: The study found that 42% of new patients presenting to a tertiary care pain clinic with a primary spine pain diagnosis met the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) survey criteria for fibromyalgia, which is a measure of widespread body pain and comorbid symptoms (e.g. trouble thinking, fatigue, mood symptoms, etc.). Patients categorized as fibromyalgia-positive using the survey measure were distinctly different from those not meeting criteria. In a multivariate regression model, independent predictors of being categorized as fibromyalgia-positive were female sex, higher neuropathic pain scores, anxiety, and lower physical function. • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Brummett: The high percentage (42%) of people meeting the predefined cut point for fibromyalgia-positive was surprising. These patients all had primary diagnoses of a spine disorder, not fibromyalgia. Hence, the specific spine disorder may in fact be a broader problem characterized by the widespread body pain and comorbid symptoms commonly associated with fibromyalgia. MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Brummett: Whereas this does not “diagnose” the patient with fibromyalgia, it suggests that there is a portion of a spine pain cohort that has pain that may be more fibromyalgia-like, rather than having pure spine pain. This type of presentation has been termed “centralized pain” by some experts due to the observed changes in central nervous system pain processing that occurs in fibromyalgia. Given that many spine pain interventions/injections target peripheral structures, the presence of fibromyalgia-like phenotype may explain some of the variance and failures seen in procedures like facet/medial branch interventions and epidural steroid injections. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Brummett: Future research is needed to better understand whether the distinct differences in characteristics in the fibromyalgialike cohort of spine patients is truly associated with altered neurophysiology or pain processing and whether these differences predict outcomes. Citation: Prevalence of the fibromyalgia phenotype in spine pain patients presenting to a tertiary care pain clinic and the potential treatment implications Chad M. Brummett, Jenna Goesling, Alex Tsodikov, Taha S. Meraj, Ronald A. Wasserman, Daniel J. Clauw and Afton L. Hassett • • • • • • • Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  23. 23. Urinary Catheter Infections: Clinical Assessment vs National Safety Network Definition MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Mohamad Fakih, MD, MPH Medical Director, Infection Prevention and Control St John Hospital and Medical Center • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Fakih: Urinary catheters are commonly used in the hospital. Although they help in the management of the sickest patients, they also present a risk for infection and other harms to the patient. The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) have made catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) publicly reportable, and no longer reimburse hospitals for these infections if they occur in hospital setting. The definition of CAUTI is based on the surveillance definition of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We looked at clinician practice, including the Infectious Diseases specialist’s impression and compared them to the NHSN definition. We found a significant difference between what clinicians think is a urinary catheter infection and give antibiotics for it compared to the NHSN definition. The NHSN definition predicted clinical infection by the Infectious Diseases specialist in only about a third of the cases. We also found that Infectious Disease specialists considered patients to have true CAUTI in only half of what clinicians treated as CAUTI. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  24. 24. Urinary Catheter Infections: Clinical Assessment vs National Safety Network Definition MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Mohamad Fakih, MD, MPH Medical Director, Infection Prevention and Control St John Hospital and Medical Center • • • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Fakih: The NHSN definition is heavily influenced by the presence of a positive urine culture of more than a 100,000 colony forming units and the presence of a fever (temperature > 38 degrees celsius). Patients may have asymptomatic bacteriuria and a fever from another source and still be identified as CAUTI using the NHSN definition. A very important result from our study is that the NHSN CAUTI definition does not reflect well the clinical practice of neither the clinicians nor the Infectious Diseases specialists, although it is used for public reporting of CAUTI by hospitals. MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Fakih: When approached by infection prevention or other members from quality, the clinician may not agree with the diagnosis based on the NHSN definition because it does not mirror the clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, patients may be viewing data that do not accurately reflect the clinical disease related to CAUTI. They would need to be cognizant that the CDC NHSN definition is a surveillance definition and not a clinical definition, and that it has its limitations. Finally, clinicians overtreat patients for CAUTI. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  25. 25. Urinary Catheter Infections: Clinical Assessment vs National Safety Network Definition MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Mohamad Fakih, MD, MPH Medical Director, Infection Prevention and Control St John Hospital and Medical Center • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Fakih: These findings have significant policy implications that potentially will impact both quality improvement efforts and financial reimbursements by CMS. Other hospitals are encouraged to evaluate whether our findings are generalizable to their settings. Related to policy implications, we suggest to consider additional measures to evaluate patient harm related to the urinary catheter, including urinary catheter utilization based on the different intensive care or non-intensive care units involved. Check out how to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections: www.catheterout.org Citation: Clinician practice and the National Healthcare Safety Network definition for the diagnosis of catheter-associated urinary tract infection Fadi Al-Qas Hanna, Oksana Sambirska, Sugantha Iyer, Susanna Szpunar, Mohamad G. Fakih AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control – 09 September 2013 (10.1016/j.ajic.2013.05.024) Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  26. 26. Unhealthy Aging and Chronic Inflammation MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Tasnime Akbaraly PhD Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale Montpellier, France • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Akbaraly: The aim of this study was to examine the association between chronic inflammation and a range of aging phenotypes, assessed approximately 10 years later in a large British population of men and women -The Whitehall II Study-. As inflammation characterises a wide range of pathological processes, we considered several aging phenotypes, including cardiovascular disease (fatal and non-fatal), non-cardiovascular mortality and successful aging which encompasses optimal functioning across different physical, mental, and cognitive domains We found that chronic inflammation characterized by high levels of interleukin-6 (>2 pg/mL) twice over the 5-year exposure period nearly halved the odds of successful aging after 10– years of follow-up compared to maintaining low levels of interleukin-6 (<1pg/mL twice over the exposure period). Chronic inflammation was also associated with increased odds of future cardiovascular disease and non-cardiovascular mortality in a dose-response fashion. These associations were found to be independent of socio-economic factors, health behaviours (smoking, physical activity), and conditions such as obesity as well as the use of anti-inflammatory drugs and acute inflammation. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  27. 27. Unhealthy Aging and Chronic Inflammation MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Tasnime Akbaraly PhD Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale Montpellier, France • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Akbaraly: Our study indicates that high interleukin-6 levels at baseline were inversely associated with most of the components that characterise successful aging; good cardiovascular, respiratory, and musculoskeletal functioning, good mental wellbeing and the absence of diabetes and disability. Exceptions were components related to good cognitive function and cancer. Regarding cognition, a more robust association with inflammation was expected according to available epidemiological literature which provides support for an inflammation-cognitive decline relationship. MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Akbaraly: Clinicians: The present results shed new light on the importance of assessing long-term chronic inflammation in geriatric clinical practice to target individuals at risk to develop unhealthy aging. Patients: To promote ideal health our study suggests managing long-term chronic inflammation. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  28. 28. Unhealthy Aging and Chronic Inflammation MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Tasnime Akbaraly PhD Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale Montpellier, France • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Akbaraly: 1. Our analyses have to be replicated in other population and other countries to extend the generalisability of the present finding. 2. We reported that the predictive ability of the aging phenotype is significantly better when inflammation is assessed with measures repeated at two time points rather than one, we recommend to assess chronic inflammation using multiple assessments of inflammatory markers to be able to distinct the short (acute) and long-term (chronic) impact of the inflammatory process on disease outcomes. Citation: Chronic inflammation as a determinant of future aging phenotypes Tasnime N. Akbaraly, Mark Hamer, Jane E. Ferrie, Gordon Lowe, G. David Batty, Gareth Hagger-Johnson, Archana Singh-Manoux, Martin J. Shipley, and Mika Kävimäki CMAJ cmaj.122072; published ahead of print September 16, 2013, doi:10.1503/cmaj.122072 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  29. 29. Diabetes: Increased Mortality Risk in Regardless of Race or Ethnicity MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Yunsheng Ma MD, PHD, MPH Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine Department of Medicine University of Massachusetts Medical School 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655 • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Ma: Regardless of race/ethnicity, diabetes increases the risk of mortality the same compared to non-diabetes among different race/ethnicity. However, since there are higher prevalence of diabetes in Black and Hispanic, death rate due to diabetes is much higher in Black and Hispanic, this is because the diabetes prevalence rates are much higher in these population. Therefore, diabetes prevention is key to reduce diabetes related mortality disparities among racial/ethnic groups. • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Ma: The rate at which women die of diabetes-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer is the same for all postmenopausal women, regardless of race or ethnicity. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  30. 30. Diabetes: Increased Mortality Risk in Regardless of Race or Ethnicity MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Yunsheng Ma MD, PHD, MPH Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine Department of Medicine University of Massachusetts Medical School 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655 • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Ma: Clinical providers should discuss with women about diabetes prevention strategies including healthy diet and exercise, especially among Black and Hispanic women. When choosing anti-diabetic medications, an evaluation of woman’s physical state and comorbidities is necessary in addition to the age. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Ma: Previous research indicate diabetes treatment may be different, White may have better access to anti-diabetic medications, but that may not be helpful for mortality among postmenopausal women. We should evaluate how geriatric syndromes and age mediate the cardiovascular-morbidity and mortality related to all classes of anti-diabetic medications in aging women. Citation: All-Cause, Cardiovascular, and Cancer Mortality Rates in Postmenopausal White, Black, Hispanic, and Asian Women With and Without Diabetes in the United States The Women’s Health Initiative, 1993–200 Yunsheng Ma, James R. Hébert, Raji Balasubramanian, Nicole M. Wedick, Barbara V. Howard, Milagros C. Rosal, Simin Liu, Chloe E. Bird, Barbara C. Olendzki, Judith K. Ockene, Jean Wactawski-Wende, Lawrence S. Phillips, Michael J. LaMonte, Kristin L. Schneider, Lorena Garcia, Ira S. Ockene, Philip A. Merriam, Deidre M. Sepavich, Rachel H. Mackey, Karen C. Johnson, and JoAnn E. Manson Am. J. Epidemiol. first published online September 17, 2013 doi:10.1093/aje/kwt177 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  31. 31. Obesity: Low Childhood IQ Raises Risk of Midlife Obesity and Late-Life Dementia MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Daniel Belsky, PhD NIA Postdoctoral Fellow Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development Duke University Box 104410 Durham, NC 27708 • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Belsky: Midlife obesity is linked with increased risk for dementia later in life. Recently, studies have reported that obese children and teens also have lower IQs. These studies have led scientists to speculate that obesity may harm the brain already in early life. We followed a cohort of 1000 children from birth through midlife (age 38 years) to understand how becoming obese might affect intellectual functioning. We measured children’s IQs when they were ages 7-11. We measured the IQs of those same children three decades later (at age 38). We found that, as expected, the children who became obesity between age 11 and age 38 years had lower IQs. But they had lower IQs already at age 11, before they became obese. We found no evidence that developing obesity contributed to decline in IQ from childhood to adulthood. This remained true when we accounted for childhood obesity preceding the first IQ measurement and when we focused on cases who developed severe obesity, with metabolic and or inflammatory abnormalities. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Belsky: These findings were not unexpected–previous longitudinal studies have shown that children with low IQs are at increased risk for obesity--but they do call for new consideration of findings linking obesity with cognitive decline. Low childhood IQ is a risk factor for both midlife obesity and late-life dementia. Therefore, studies linking obesity with dementia may need to consider premorbid IQ lest they overestimate the effects of obesity on cognitive decline. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  32. 32. Obesity: Low Childhood IQ Raises Risk of Midlife Obesity and Late-Life Dementia MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Daniel Belsky, PhD NIA Postdoctoral Fellow Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development Duke University Box 104410 Durham, NC 27708 • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Belsky: Obesity is unlikely to damage the brain during the first half of the life course. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Belsky: Future studies should investigate whether associations between midlife obesity and later life cognitive decline can be explained by premorbid differences in IQ between obese cases and lean controls. Citation: Is Obesity Associated With a Decline in Intelligence Quotient During the First Half of the Life Course? Daniel W. Belsky, Avshalom Caspi, Sidra Goldman-Mellor, Madeline H. Meier, Sandhya Ramrakha, Richie Poulton, and Terrie E. Moffitt Am. J. Epidemiol. first published online September 12, 2013 doi:10.1093/aje/kwt135 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  33. 33. MRIs of the Knee: How big a role is doctor’s financial stake? MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Matthew P. Lungren, MD Duke University Medical Center • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Lungren: We certainly were curious enough to ask the question, and that is the motivation for the study in the first place, whether or not there would be a significant difference. But we were surprised that it was such a drastic difference, particularly when you take into account how we designed the study to reduce potential confounding influences. Its important to note that this difference occurred despite otherwise highly similar pathology, demographics and referring physician characteristics between the two groups. Again, these findings suggest that there is a different threshold for ordering MRI examinations which may be due to financial incentive MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Lungren: There’s a great quote by Michael Novack that I think says it all: “Our capacity for self-deception has no known limits.” Basically this study does raise legitimate questions: Are these studies being performed unnecessarily? Are these machines being over utilized because of an unconscious bias? Patients may not want to second guess their doctor’s decision to order a scan, but it makes sense to ask whether they’re being referred to an imaging center where the doctor has a financial interest. Basically, the goal here is to be more transparent, which should be the default anytime there could be potential for violating the trust of the doctor patient relationship. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  34. 34. MRIs of the Knee: How big a role is doctor’s financial stake? MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Matthew P. Lungren, MD Duke University Medical Center • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Lungren: We hope that this and other studies like this will capture the attention of the payors, including the government as we move toward cutting costs and eliminating waste from the health care system. Our group supports legislative and payer driven restriction of advanced imaging equipment (CT and MRI) self-referral by clinicians, as well as mandatory formal disclosure of all financial relationships between individual ordering physicians and imaging equipment their patients are referred to, documentation of patient referral source by imaging facilities, and registration of equipment to allow payment data collection. Citation: Lungren MP, et al “Physician self-referral: Frequency of negative findings at MR imaging of the knee as a marker of appropriate utilization” Radiology 2013; DOI: 10.1148/radiol.13130281. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  35. 35. Pediatrics: Psychosomatic Problems in Bullied Children MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gianluca Gini, PhD and Tiziana Pozzoli, PhD Department of Developmental and Social Psychology University of Padua, Padua, Italy • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: Results of this meta-analysis show that bullied children are twice as likely as non-bullied children to experience psychosomatic symptoms (e.g., headache, stomachache, backache, abdominal pain, dizziness, sleeping problems, poor appetite, bedwetting, skin problems, vomiting), especially in samples that included an higher proportion of boys. Importantly, the same result was found not only with cross-sectional studies but also in a meta-analysis of six studies that employed a longitudinal design. • • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Answer: Not really. This meta-analysis confirmed the findings of former studies with a much larger sample of studies and participants from several countries around the world. MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? It is very important that adults be ready to identify children who are at risk of being bullied. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that any recurrent and unexplained somatic symptom can be a warning sign of bullying victimization. Because children do not easily talk about their bullying experiences, adults could approach the issue of bullying through general questions, for example by inquiring about the child’s experience and friends in school. If the child seems to be withdrawn from peers, the adult should ask for the reason and check if teasing, name calling or deliberate exclusion may be involved. Asking if the child feels safe at school can further allow the adult to gain insight into the level of concern that the child is experiencing. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  36. 36. Pediatrics: Psychosomatic Problems in Bullied Children MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gianluca Gini, PhD and Tiziana Pozzoli, PhD Department of Developmental and Social Psychology University of Padua, Padua, Italy • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Answer: We call for new research efforts aimed at elucidating the mechanisms through which bullying affects children’s health over time. Moreover, there is need for research that investigates how other environmental factors interact with peer victimization experiences to determine health risk. Longitudinal studies that address the mediating role of environmental factors on the peer victimization-health problems link are much needed. Citation: Bullied Children and Psychosomatic Problems: A Meta-analysis Gianluca Gini and Tiziana Pozzoli Pediatrics peds.2013-0614; published ahead of print September 16, 2013, doi:10.1542/peds.2013-0614 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  37. 37. Dementia: Lewy Body vs Parkinson’s Disease MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Rodolfo Savica, MD, MSc Department of Neurology, College of Medicine Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of this study? Dr. Savica: This study is the first in North America to explore the incidence of DLB and PDD in a population based sample. We found that the overall incidence of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), considered the second leading cause of neurodegenerative dementia after Alzheimer`s disease, is lower than that of Parkinson`s disease (PD), increases steeply with age, and is markedly higher in men than in women. • We used the unique population-based medical records linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, in Olmsted County, MN. In particular, the overall incidence of Parkinson Disease Dementia (PDD) was 2.5 cases per 100,000 person-years; whereas the incidence of Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) was 3.5 cases per 100,000 person-years. At, the incidence of Parkinson Disease (14.2 cases per 100,000 person-years) was 4-fold higher than DLB and 2.4 times higher than the incidence of DLB and PDD combined. In addition we found that the incidence of DLB was higher in men than in women; whereas PDD was similar across sexes. Furthermore we identified a series of differences in the clinical symptoms between DLB and PDD: DLB cases presented more hallucinations (62.5% vs 20.0%; p˂. 001), more cognitive fluctuations (25% vs 8.9%; p.03) and, although not statistically significant, more myoclonus (12.5% vs 4.4%; p=.15). • • • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Savica: We were somehow surprised that PDD is less common that expected. PDD is also less common than DLB. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  38. 38. Dementia: Lewy Body vs Parkinson’s Disease MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Rodolfo Savica, MD, MSc Department of Neurology, College of Medicine Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Savica: The differences in the clinical features may be extremely important to differentiate between DLB and PDD. This information will be extremely helpful to clarify the correct diagnosis and to guide therapeutic interventions that may be different diseases and sexes. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Savica: This study is a starting point to highlight and expand the research on DLB and PDD. We have a number of studies already in completion that will provide further help to patients, clinicians and scientist that are involved in DLB and PDD care. Citation: Incidence of Dementia With Lewy Bodies and Parkinson Disease Dementia Savica R, Grossardt BR, Bower JH, Boeve BF, Ahlskog J, Rocca WA. Incidence of Dementia With Lewy Bodies and Parkinson Disease Dementia. JAMA Neurol. 2013;():-. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.3579. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  39. 39. Social Isolation Linked to Mortality MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Matthew S. Pantell, MD, MS Department of Pediatrics University of California, San Francisco • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Pantell: First of all, our study confirms the strong association between social isolation and mortality in a nationally representative sample from the US. Furthermore, it shows that, within the same national sample, social isolation is a similarly strong predictor of mortality as compared to smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Examining individual components of social isolation, our study shows that, among both women and men, not living with a partner and not participating in religious activities frequently are strong individual predictors of mortality. Finally, our work shows that infrequent social contact is associated with mortality among women, and not participating in social clubs/organizations is associated with mortality among men. • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Pantell: It was a little surprising that obesity and cholesterol were not stronger predictors of mortality. But clinicians are used to monitoring for these risk factors and intervening, which may explain why they did not predict mortality that well. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  40. 40. Social Isolation Linked to Mortality MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Matthew S. Pantell, MD, MS Department of Pediatrics University of California, San Francisco • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Pantell: Clinicians and patients should take away that it is important to be aware of and explore patients’ social situation. Social support is something that is not necessarily discussed in health care visits, but our study suggests that it is something that is just as predictive of death as traditional clinical risk factors. Knowing the amount of social support patients have can potentially help clinicians determine who might benefit from more health care surveillance. If two patients come in with the same medical problems and the only difference is that one is socially isolated and the other is very socially integrated, I would be more worried about the former. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Pantell: The next step would be to determine what to do with this information. Future studies should determine the possible benefits of screening for social isolation in clinical settings, as well as what interventions should be carried out once someone is identified as being socially isolated. These interventions may come in the form of increasing social support for that person, or, they may also be directed at more medical surveillance of that person. Finally, future studies should aim to understand the mechanisms through which social isolation increases mortality risk. Citation: Social Isolation: A Predictor of Mortality Comparable to Traditional Clinical Risk Factors Matthew Pantell, David Rehkopf, Douglas Jutte, S. Leonard Syme, John Balmes, and Nancy Adler. (2013). Social Isolation: A Predictor of Mortality Comparable to Traditional Clinical Risk Factors. American Journal of Public Health. e-View Ahead of Print. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  41. 41. Adolescents: Bending the Obesity Curve MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ronald J. Iannotti, PhD Prevention Research Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Iannotti: Although average BMI percentile increased from 2001 to 2005 it did not increase from 2005 to 2009. This is consistent with some recent studies that suggest the increase in overweight and obesity may be leveling off. We suggest that we may be ‘bending the curve’. During the same period, physical activity and consumption of fruits and vegetables increased while television watching and consumption of sweets and sweetened beverages decreased. We cannot say whether television watching was replaced with more time spent on computers but we did not find an increase in computer use from 2005 to 2009. • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Iannotti: YES! . Over the past four or five decades adolescent overweight and obesity have steadily increased along with television watching and consumption of foods high in sugar, while physical activity and the relative consumption of fruits and vegetables has decreased. These results are very encouraging. This would be the first decade in a long time where overweight did not increase substantially and where healthful behaviors increased. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  42. 42. Adolescents: Bending the Obesity Curve MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ronald J. Iannotti, PhD Prevention Research Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland • • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Iannotti: There is still lots of room for improvement. Most adolescents are not getting 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity and day and the consumption of fruits and vegetables is not even close to the recommended 5 servings per day. Because of gender differences, clinicians might focus on increasing physical activity in girls and decreasing their consumption of sweets. For boys, the focus might be on diet and television, decreasing television watching and increasing fruits and vegetables. For parents, they should continue to encourage their children to get more exercise and to eat fruits and vegetables. Some types would be to demonstrate the behaviors they want their children to adopt. For example, they could take a walk after dinner with the entire family. When their children do watch television, they could make sure that healthful snacks (for example, cut up fruits and vegetables) are easily available. We tend to be lazy and having good choices easily available makes it more likely that we will make those choices. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Iannotti: We need to continue to monitor these trends and identify whether the changes in health behaviors are causing this change in the rate of growth in the obesity epidemic. Citation: Trends in Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, Diet, and BMI Among US Adolescents, 2001–2009 Ronald J. Iannotti and Jing Wang Pediatrics peds.2013-1488; published ahead of print September 16, 2013, doi:10.1542/peds.2013-1488 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  43. 43. Stroke Risk: Increased Risk with Intraplaque Carotid Artery Hemorrhage MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Tobias Saam, MD Institute of Clinical Radiology Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ Hosp Munich, Germany • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Saam: The results of our meta-analysis suggest that despite a large degree of detected heterogeneity of the published studies, the presence of intraplaque hemorrhage by MRI in patients with carotid artery disease is associated with an approximately 5.6-fold higher risk for cerebrovascular events, such as TIA or stroke, as compared to subjects without intraplaque hemorrhage. • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Saam: Most of our findings were expected, as several previous studies have shown an association of carotid intraplaque hemorrhage with ischemic results. We confirmed theses previous studies and were able to provide more precisely risk estimates due to the effect that we were able to include data of 8 separate studies with almost 700 patients and 108 events. However, we were surprised that the annualized event rate in subjects with detectable IPH was really high in subjects with intraplaque hemorrhage compared to subjects without intraplaque hemorrhage (17.7% vs 2.4%). Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  44. 44. Stroke Risk: Increased Risk with Intraplaque Carotid Artery Hemorrhage MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Tobias Saam, MD Institute of Clinical Radiology Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ Hosp Munich, Germany • • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Saam: While this result does not necessarily justify the widespread clinical use of carotid MRI in patients it provides a strong rationale for larger clinical trials to determine whether specific MRI plaque findings in the carotid arteries might be able to risk stratify patients into those who benefit from conservative versus interventional therapy. Furthermore, we showed that symptomatic patients with carotid stenosis and IPH have a particularly high risk of a recurrent event and, as a consequence, might benefit from early interventions. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Saam: We were not able to analyze the event rates of symptomatic patients with IPH and <50% stenosis, given the very limited data, although there is increasing evidence that such lesions might play a role in the pathogenesis of symptoms in patients with cryptogenic stroke. Several ongoing prospective MRI trials, such as the CAPIAS trial (Carotid Plaque Imaging in Acute Stroke, NCT01284933), are investigating the consequences of such lesions on the occurrence of cerebrovascular events in patients with acute ischemic stroke and without significant carotid artery stenosis. Citation: Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review of the Predictive Value of Carotid Plaque Hemorrhage on Cerebrovascular Events by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tobias Saam; Holger Hetterich; Verena Hoffmann; Chun Yuan; Marcus Treitl; Martin Dichgans; Holger Poppert; Maximilian Reiser; Fabian Bamberg Abstract Session Title: Vascular Medicine (Noncoronary): Molecules, Mechanisms and Physiology Abstract 12997: Circulation. 2012; 126: A12997 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  45. 45. Breast Cancer in Young Women: Decisions that Affect Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Shoshana M. Rosenberg, ScD, MPH Researcher, Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers Dana-Farber Cancer Institute • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: Rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) have been increasing among all breast cancer patients, however this trend has been most pronounced among the youngest women with breast cancer. Because of this trend, we sought to better understand why the youngest women – those diagnosed at age 40 or younger – were deciding to have this surgery. Many women not considered “high-risk”, e.g., those without a cancer pre-disposing mutation, cited a desire to prevent the breast cancer from spreading as well as a desire to improve survival as reasons for undergoing the procedure, indicating they overestimate the benefit of having this surgery, as CPM does not affect these outcomes. While CPM does reduce the risk of developing breast cancer in the unaffected breast, in women who are not considered “high-risk”, this risk is relatively low, however many women overestimated this risk as well. MedicalResearch.com: 
Were any of the findings unexpected? Answer: One of the interesting findings was that most women understood that survival does not depend on what type of surgery is chosen however many women cited improved survival as a reason to have CPM. We think that anxiety and fear of recurrence is likely leading some women to choose CPM (almost all women also cited peace of mind as a reason to have CPM) despite knowing objectively that it does not improve survival. In future work, we hope to more comprehensively investigate this discordance. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  46. 46. Breast Cancer in Young Women: Decisions that Affect Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Shoshana M. Rosenberg, ScD, MPH Researcher, Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers Dana-Farber Cancer Institute • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Answer: In addition to more effective risk communication, there is a need to better support women during the decisionmaking process by addressing anxiety, fears, and concerns, as our findings suggest that under-attention to these important issues might lead women to choose more surgery than is actually needed. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Answer: Correcting misperceptions and misunderstandings is important however our findings suggest that this needs to be done in combination with better psychosocial support during the decision-making process. In addition, women should be informed of the potential that certain health and quality of life outcomes might be adversely impacted. In our study, onethird of women said the number of surgeries needed was worse than they had expected and 42% said their sense of sexuality was worse than expected. Citation: Perceptions, Knowledge, and Satisfaction With Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Among Young Women With Breast Cancer: A Cross-sectional Survey Shoshana M. Rosenberg, ScD, MPH; Michaela S. Tracy, BA; Meghan E. Meyer, BS; Karen Sepucha, PhD; Shari Gelber, MS, MSW; Judi Hirshfield-Bartek, MS; Susan Troyan, MD; Monica Morrow, MD; Lidia Schapira, MD; Steven E. Come, MD; Eric P. Winer, MD; and Ann H. Partridge, MD, MPH Ann Intern Med. 2013;159(6):373-381. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-159-6-201309170-00003 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  47. 47. Melanoma: PDK1 Kinase Required for Development and Metastasis MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ze’ev Ronai, Ph.D. Professor and scientific director of Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute La Jolla San Diego, Calif. • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: This study provides the first direct evidence of the importance of the PDK1 enzyme in the development of melanoma and in the metastasis of this aggressive tumor type. We demonstrate, with a genetic mouse melanoma model (harboring the Braf/Pten mutations commonly seen in human melanomas) and/or pharmacological inhibitors against PDK1, that melanoma requires this enzyme for its development, and more so – for its ability to metastasize. Since PDK1 is key kinase that regulates a number of protein kinases, which are currently being assessed in clinical trials (including AKT), our finding points to a new set of targets that could be more amenable for effective combination therapy in melanoma. • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Answer: We were surprised by the degree of inhibition seen in melanoma metastasis using the genetic model, and even more so by how much of the PDK1 activity was AKTindependent, thereby pointing to kinases other than AKT that are regulated by PDK1 as mediators of melanoma development. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  48. 48. Melanoma: PDK1 Kinase Required for Development and Metastasis MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ze’ev Ronai, Ph.D. Professor and scientific director of Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute La Jolla San Diego, Calif. • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take awayfrom your report? Answer: These findings point to a possible new tangible therapeutic target for melanoma therapy. Since PDK1 inhibitors arecurrently in clinical trials, and others are at advance stages of development, they should be considered for combination therapy with Braf inhibitors, MEK inhibitors or immunotherapies (PD1 inhibitors). MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Answer: We are excited about these findings and plan to extend them to better understand which of the >20 kinases regulated by PDK1 is required for the development and metastasis of melanoma, and which of the melanoma patient tumors are more amenable for treatment with PDK1 inhibitors. Validation of our findings in other laboratories, including some of the pharmaceutical companies that have PDK1 inhibitors would be a logical step forward in further assessing PDK1 as melanoma target for therapy. Citation: Genetic inactivation or pharmacological inhibition of Pdk1 delays development and inhibits metastasis of BrafV600E::Pten–/– melanoma M Scortegagna, C Ruller, Y Feng, R Lazova, H Kluger, J-L Li, S K De, R Rickert, M Pellecchia, M Bosenberg and Z A Ronai Oncogene , (16 September 2013) | doi:10.1038/onc.2013.383 Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  49. 49. Opiod Prescriptions: Marked Increase in 10 Year Period Matthew Daubresse, MHS Research Data Analyst Center for Drug Safety and Effectiveness Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Baltimore, MD 21205 • • • • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Answer: Over the past decade, prescriptions for non-opioid medications remained stable or declined among ambulatory pain visits in the United States. In visits for new-onset musculoskeletal pain, non-opioid prescribing decreased from 38% of visits in 2000 to 29% of visits in 2010. During this time, opioid prescriptions nearly doubled. Few patient, provider, and visit characteristics were associated with the likelihood of opioid receipt, suggesting increases in opioid prescribing have occurred generally across different groups of patients. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Answer: We were surprised to discover prescriptions for non-opioid medications remained stable or declined, especially given no significant change in the proportion of doctor’s office visits with pain or in the proportion of pain visits treated with pain relievers. MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Answer: Clinicians and patients should be fully aware of the trade-offs between different pain-relievers. Efforts to improve the identification and treatment of pain may have contributed to an over-reliance on prescription opioids and reductions in the use of safer alternatives to opioids like ibuprofen and acetaminophen. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Answer: Future work should examine the large proportion of pain visits that did not result in the receipt of an analgesic. This type of work would assist in determining whether current levels of pain treatment in the United States are sufficient. With more detailed information related to indication and dosage, future studies could also assist in determining the appropriateness of pain prescriptions. Citation: Ambulatory Diagnosis and Treatment of Nonmalignant Pain in the United States, 2000–2010 M. Daubresse, H.Y. Chang, S. Viswanathan, Y. Yu, N. Shah, R.S. Stafford, S. Kruszewski, G.C. Alexander Value in Health – May 2013 (Vol. 16, Issue 3, Page A127, DOI: 10.1016/j.jval.2013.03.615) Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  50. 50. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: On-Pump vs Off-Pump Trends and Mortality MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Faisal G. Bakaeen, MD FACS Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TexasThe Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, The Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, Texas • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Bakaeen: The relative use of off-pump CABG peaked at 24% in 2003, followed by a slow decline after that to about 19%. In addition, the conversion rate from off- to on-pump decreased with time and has stayed below 3.5% in recent years. Perioperative mortality rates decreased over time for both on- and off-pump CABG and have stayed below 2% since 2006. The mortality associated with converted cases was high regardless of the surgery year. • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Bakaeen: No, we speculated that after an initial hype associated with off-pump surgery, enthusiasm has dampened and that the utilization rate declined in recent years. Our current study served to confirm and document this trend. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  51. 51. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: On-Pump vs Off-Pump Trends and Mortality MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Faisal G. Bakaeen, MD FACS Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TexasThe Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, The Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, Texas • • • • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Bakaeen: Taken into context and in conjunction with reports from recent randomized trials that show no real advantage to off-pump over on-pump CABG, one can expect an even “tougher sell” for off-pump in the future. In fact, there are concerns relating to a higher risk of incomplete revascularization and the need for subsequent revascularization when CABG is performed off-pump. In a separate study that is based on the same database analyzed here, our group has demonstrated that off-pump CABG may be associated with decreased long-term survival. Having said that, the off-pump CABG is useful in select anatomic and physiologic scenarios, such as in patients with porcelain aortas, those with advanced liver or pulmonary disease. In addition, there are surgeons at high volume off-pump centers with necessary infrastructure and resources that have reported matching (or even improving upon) on-pump outcomes. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Bakaeen: I think follow-up studies from the ROOBY, CORONARY, and GOCABE trials will shed interesting light on longerterm outcomes of the two revascularization strategies. Could off-pump CABG compromise long-term survival? I don’t think that there will be any new large scale randomized trials comparing on- and off-pump CABG in the future, but I do think that there is a real need for studies to evaluate how to best teach off-pump techniques to future generations in the face of declining off- (and on-) pump CABG volumes. It is undeniable that the off-pump technique is a useful skill in the armamentarium of cardiac surgeons. Citation: Trends Over Time in the Relative Use and Associated Mortality of On-Pump and Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in the Veterans Affairs System Bakaeen FG, Kelly RF, Chu D, Jessen ME, Ward HB, Holman WL. Trends Over Time in the Relative Use and Associated Mortality of On-Pump and Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in the Veterans Affairs System. JAMA Surg. 2013;():. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2013.3580. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  52. 52. Dental Caries and Head and Neck Cancer MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Mine Tezal, DDS, PhD Oral Biology University at Buffalo NYS Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Tezal: We observed an inverse association between dental caries and head and neck cancer (HNSCC), which persisted among never smokers and never drinkers. Besides untreated caries, two other objective measures of long-standing caries history (endodontic treatments and crowns) were also inversely associated with HNSCC with similar effect sizes, supporting the validity of the association. Missing teeth was associated with increased risk of HNSCC in univariate analyses, but after adjustment for potential confounders, its effect was attenuated and was no longer statistically significant. MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Tezal: Yes, an inverse association between dental caries and HNSCC was an unexpected finding since dental caries has been considered a sign of poor oral health along with periodontal disease. Periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory disease, was associated with an increased risk of HNSCC, which explains the lack of association with missing teeth since more than half of the teeth are lost due to periodontal disease. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  53. 53. Dental Caries and Head and Neck Cancer MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Mine Tezal, DDS, PhD Oral Biology University at Buffalo NYS Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Tezal: The message, of course, is not to get caries to prevent cancer. Dental caries is the demineralization of tooth structures by lactic acid from fermentation of carbohydrates by commensal bacteria, including streptococci, lactobacilli, actinomyces, and bifidobacteria, the same kinds of bacteria used in yogurt production. These commensal bacteria have important roles in local mucosal and systemic immunity, and their reduction has been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases, allergies and cancer. They produce antitumorigenic and antimutagenic compounds, favor an anti-inflammatory response, and inhibit adhesion and growth of pathogenic bacteria. • It is important to understand that cariogenic bacteria are part of the normal flora, and their presence is not sufficient to cause dental caries in the absence of the other risk factors, such as dental plaque, frequent consumption of sugars, and reduced saliva. In addition, caries is a dental plaque-related disease. Lactic acid bacteria cause demineralization (caries) only when they are in dental plaque at immediate contact with the tooth surface. The presence of these otherwise beneficial bacteria in saliva or on mucosal surfaces may protect the host against chronic inflammatory diseases and HNSCC. We could think of dental caries as a collateral damage, and develop strategies to reduce its risk while preserving the beneficial effects of the lactic acid bacteria. For example, antimicrobial treatment, vaccination or gene therapy against cariogenic bacteria may lead to more harm than benefit in the long run, including a shift in microbial ecology towards pathogenic bacteria, and increased risks of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Instead, strategies preserving microbial ecology beneficial to the host such as mechanical plaque control (brushing and flossing), preservation of saliva, fluoride use, and refraining from frequent intake of sugars, antimicrobials, and smoking may be wiser. MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Tezal: This study provides insights for prospective studies to assess potential beneficial effects of lactic acid bacteria and the associated immune responses on HNSCC. Citation: Tezal M, Scannapieco FA, Wactawski-Wende J, et al. Dental Caries and Head and Neck Cancers. JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013;():-. doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2013.4569. • • • • Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  54. 54. Hypertension Control: Financial Incentives Effects MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Laura A. Petersen, MD, MPH MEDVAMC Associate Chief of Staff, Research Director, VA HSR&D Center of Excellence (152) Houston TX 77030 Professor of Medicine Chief, Section of Health Services Research Baylor College of Medicine • • MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Petersen: VA physicians randomized to the individual incentive group were more likely than controls to improve their treatment of hypertension. The adjusted changes over the study period in Veterans meeting the combined BP/appropriate response measure were 8.8 percentage points for the individuallevel, 3.7 for the practice-level, 5.5 for the combined, and 0.47 for the control groups. Therefore, a physician in the individual group caring for 1000 patients with hypertension would have about 84 additional patients achieving blood pressure control or appropriate response after 1 year. The effect of the incentive was not sustained after the washout period. Although performance did not decline to preintervention levels, the decline was significant. None of the incentives resulted in increased incidence of hypotension compared with controls. While the use of guideline-recommended medications increased significantly over the course of the study in the intervention groups, there was no significant change compared to the control group. The mean individual incentive earnings over the study represented approximately 1.6% of a physician’s salary, assuming a mean salary of $168,000. • • MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? Dr. Petersen: I thought the change would be sustained after the intervention stopped. It was a long intervention and I thought people’s practices would change over time. However, it shows that the incentives were working. If their performance had not fallen off after the incentives were stopped, then we might question whether the incentives caused the effect in the first place. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  55. 55. Hypertension Control: Financial Incentives Effects MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Laura A. Petersen, MD, MPH MEDVAMC Associate Chief of Staff, Research Director, VA HSR&D Center of Excellence (152) Houston TX 77030 Professor of Medicine Chief, Section of Health Services Research Baylor College of Medicine • • • • • • MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Dr. Petersen: These results do show that financial incentives can be an important tool in positively impacting patient care. As similar types of pay for performance initiatives are instituted by the Affordable Care Act, more research into the way that providers and patients respond will be important to guide health care policy MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? Dr. Petersen: Future research should explore who system-level changes to promote sustained changes in physician behavior can be incentivized Citation: Petersen LA, Simpson K, Pietz K, et al. Effects of Individual Physician-Level and Practice-Level Financial Incentives on Hypertension Care: A Randomized Trial. JAMA. 2013;310(10):10421050. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.276303. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com
  56. 56. Atrial fibrillation: Surgical and Transcatheter Ablation MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Elisa Ebrille, MD Department of Cardiology, School of Medicine Fiorenzo Gaita, M.D. Director Division of Cardiology Department of Medical Sciences University of Turin, Turin, Italy • • • • MedicalResearch.com What are the main findings of the study? Answer: We evaluated 33 patients with long-standing atrial fibrillation and valvular heart disease who underwent valve surgery and concomitant cryoablation (pulmonary veins isolation, mitral isthmus and roof line lesions) from 2000 to 2002. The surgically created ablation lesion was validated with electroanatomic mapping. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation was performed in cases with lesion incompleteness and these patients were followed for over 10 years. A hybrid approach, combining surgical ablation procedure consisting of pulmonary veins isolation and creation of left atrial linear lesions (mitral isthmus and roof lines), along with endocardial ablation, when necessary, led to a significant clinical improvement in patients with long-standing atrial fibrillation and valvular heart disease during a long-term follow-up (> 10 years). With the hybrid approach, pulmonary veins isolation and transmural left atrial linear lesions were obtained in a high percentage of patients (79%). When achieved and electrophysiologically demonstrated, the complete ablation scheme was effective in more than 80% of patients in maintaining sinus rhythm throughout follow-up. Read the rest of the interview on MedicalResearch.com

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