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TM PLUS Presentation Delivery Techniques

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BPAP Training in the University of Makati

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TM PLUS Presentation Delivery Techniques

  1. 1. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 1 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision # Information Sheet Delivering Presentations Learning Objectives: After reading this Information Sheet you should be able to: 1. explain the recommended principles on helping people to learn; 2. open a training session with greatest impact and make a structured closing; and 3. identify the needed elements in delivering presentations Delivering Presentations Most presentations will consist of an introduction, the body of the talk and a conclusion. The introduction prepares the audience for what you will say in the body of the talk and the conclusion reminds them of your key points. Good presentations raise questions in the listeners' mind. Good speakers encourage questions both during and after the presentation and are prepared to answer them. A recommended principle of helping people to learn is:  Tell them what you are going to tell them (Introduction).  Tell them (Body).  Tell them what you have told them (Conclusion).  Tell them what you are going to tell them (Introduction). A good introduction does four things:  Attracts and focuses the attention of the audience  Puts the speaker and audience at ease  Explains the purpose of the talk and what you would like to achieve  Gives an overview of the key points of your presentation  Tell them (Body). The body of a presentation must be presented in a logical order that is easy for the audience to follow and natural to your topic. Divide your content into sections and make sure that the audience knows where they are at any time during your talk. It is often a good idea to pause between main sections of your talk. You can ask for questions, sum up the point or explain what the next point will be. If you have a visual with an outline of your talk on it, you can put this on the projector briefly and point to the next section.
  2. 2. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 2 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision # Examples, details and visual aids add interest to a presentation and help you get your message through. Here are some questions you can ask yourself about the examples you include:  Are they relevant to the experience of the audience?  Are they concrete?  Will the audience find them interesting?  Are they varied?  Are they memorable?  Tell them what you have told them. A good conclusion does two things:  Reminds the audience of your key points  Reinforces your message Your conclusion should end the presentation on a positive note and make your audience feel that they have used their time well listening to you. A. Openings At the start, the initial “tell them” is a short statement of the main items of the content of the session, the objectives, and any special aspects of this content. Introductions or openings should accomplish the following tasks:  Forge a bond with the audience  Establish credibility and goodwill  Create Interest in the subject  Preview the presentation by introducing your main points  Relate the topic to the audience  “Hook” the audience by grabbing their attention. Warm up, breathe deeply, stretch, so you are relaxed and ready to begin with a bang. Otherwise you are likely to start with something ordinary, such as “I’m here today to teach you about….” The following are proven grabbers for opening a stimulating session:  A visual aid with impact, an audio or video presentation  A model or example of the subject about which you are to talk
  3. 3. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 3 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision #  An unexpected entry or gimmicky introduction to the subject (something that attracts attention, perhaps give them a laugh, but does not turn them off with what they think is going to be a comedy act)  Show a funny, topic-related cartoon, picture or video clip that can be grasped visually in a few seconds. Pretest your opener  Begin with a startling fact, graphic or touching story  Quote someone well respected and well known  Review events leading to the need for training  Challenge participants to learn something new  Involve the participants with you in some way, such as answering a question.  Convey your enthusiasm for the topic  Be passionate about participants learning from you Focus on Results from the Start  Right from the start reassure training participants by your words and actions that their time will be well spent.  Within the first few minutes show them that they will receive important information that will be delivered effectively.  Promise participants that they will leave knowing 3 new tips or having 2 crucial skills- and then be sure to deliver See what fits your style. B. Delivery Focus on making yourself understood. Aim to express not to impress. Be careful of the tone of your voice. Your tone should display confidence, professionalism, politeness, sincerity and friendliness. You may want to use simple words. Never assume that your audience will see the connections that you see between arguments, facts and anecdotes. Reflection Questions: What effective openings have you used recently? Try to provide a sample statement to the following types of opening statements: Examples: Sample Dramatic Statement: “Good morning. Today I would like to direct our attention to a situation that, if left unattended, will have a direct and long lasting effect on every one present.” Sample Lead In Question: “Before I start my presentation, let me ask you a question. By a show of hands, how many of you saw the interview of the chief executive last night?
  4. 4. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 4 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision # (1) Transitions One of the best ways to make it easy for your audience to follow your points is to include transitions. Transitions are words and phrases that signal ideas which are connected. It is a training element that trainers must make between activities in order to ensure that participants are fully conscious of what they are doing and why they are doing it. Transitions serve the following purposes:  Clarify the purpose of an activity  Connect one activity with what has gone before and what is happening next  Help participants know where they are at all times in the program’s flow  Give the trainer the opportunity to summarize and reinforce key points Types and Examples of Transitions TRANSITIONS TO EMPHASIZE A POINT again another key point first thing to remember for this reason frequently important to realize Indeed in fact key point most compelling evidence most important information must be remembered on the negative side on the positive side point often overlooked significant that surprising surprisingly enough to emphasize to point out to repeat truly with this in mind TRANSITIONS TO SHOW LOCATION above across against along alongside amid among around away from back of behind below beneath beside between beyond by down in front of in the center of in the middle of inside into near off on top of outside over throughout to the left to the right under up
  5. 5. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 5 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision # TRANSITIONS TO COMPARE ITEMS accordingly also as comparable to in the same way in the same manner in conjunction with this just as like likewise similarly sometimes TRANSITIONS TO CONTRAST ITEMS although as opposed to but conversely counter to even so even though however in spite of this in the meantime nevertheless on the contrary on the other hand otherwise sometimes still yet TRANSITIONS TO SHOW TIME about after afterward as soon as at at the same time before during finally first immediately in the meantime later last meanwhile next next week next time next year prior to second next soon then third till today tomorrow until when yesterday TRANSITIONS TO CLARIFY for example for instance in other words put another way seems clear from this simply stated stated differently that is to clarify to illustrate the point TRANSITIONS TO ADD INFORMATION additionally again along with also and another as well besides equally important finally for example for instance further furthermore in addition likewise moreover next together with
  6. 6. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 6 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision # TRANSITIONS TO CONCLUDE OR SUMMARIZE accordingly all in all as a result consequently due to finally in closing in conclusion in short in summary in the last analysis lastly logical conclusion is therefore thus to conclude TRANSITIONS TO ENUMERATE These transitions are to be used as sets; More transitions can be added to each set as needed. First Second Third One important Equally important Most important A significant Another significant Of greatest significance First Next Last In the beginning Toward the middle At the end One Also In addition (2) Timeline Keep to the time allotted. If you can, keep it short. It's better to under- run than over-run. Stick to the plan for the presentation, don't be tempted to digress as you will eat up time and could end up in a dead-end! (3) Energizing the Sessions What is stimulating to one person may be irrelevant to another, so presenters must expect to “lose” everyone at some time during the training. Participants will be distracted by personal issues, unreturned phone calls and unfinished tasks. People do tune out. Be prepared and prevent participants from staying tuned out for long by applying the following techniques:  Elaborate and give examples related to what participants are seeing on the slides rather than just reading them aloud  Illustrate with interesting analogies and memorable stories  Capture attention by teaching once concept from one corner of the room and another from a different spot  Create games, contests and word puzzles to reinforce terms
  7. 7. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 7 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision #  Discuss future applications and possible obstacles with participants, so they are thinking about the present and the future Infuse the session with your own energy. (4) Humor Humor can do much to communicate messages of "humanness." Use it in ways that are natural and comfortable expressions of your individuality. Most important of all, don't be afraid to laugh at yourself. If you make a slip in pronunciation or drop 3 pens in a row, and your behavior makes students smile or even laugh, join them. Some tips in using humor in your presentations:  It is not essential. It is an aid for those who know how to use it  Let humor inject itself into material  Humor must fit audience and material  Humor should be kind  Go easy with jokes on religion and race (politics)  Be careful with dialect stories  The best jokes are about yourself (5) Discussions and Questions Unless explicitly told not to, leave time for discussion – enough time to sufficiently allow clarification of points. Find opportunities to find out if your audience is getting your message correctly. Clarify, illustrate, give examples or summarize in order to drive your point. See things from their point of view. If there are any questions avoid being tense when you do this as the audience may find it intimidating (i. e. it may come across as any questions? - if there are, it shows you were not paying attention). If questions are slow in coming, you can start things off by asking a question of the audience - so have one prepared. Tips in Fielding Questions:  Stay in control  Give the questioner full attention  Be prepared with answers to possible difficult questions  Repeat or paraphrase a question
  8. 8. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 8 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision #  Don’t’ guess the answer  Recognize different adversarial questions and practice techniques for answering them C. Closing You will usually summarize main points, and often draw conclusions from facts presented in the presentation. But you may also:  Make recommendations  Call for action or challenge the audience to act  Use a quotation  Make a prediction or forecast  Use a prop, visual aid or demonstration to emphasize the major point The main objectives of your closing should be:  To signal the end of your speech  To summarize the material  To leave the audience with something memorable and worthwhile
  9. 9. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 9 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision # Self-Check True or False. Identify whether the statements are True or False. Write your answers on the space provided for. _______1. Openings should attract the attention of the audience. _______2. It is important to provide an overview of the key points of your topic at the end of the presentation. _______3. One of the three principles of helping people learn through presentations is, “Ask them what you told them.” _______4. The body of the presentation must follow a logical flow of ideas. _______5. You should end your presentation on a positive note to make them feel that it was worth listening to you. Enumeration. Provide what is being asked for. 1. Give the purposes of using transitions in your presentations. 2. Enumerate the techniques for energizing your sessions. 3. List the main objectives of your Closing. 4. List the things that an Opening should accomplish.
  10. 10. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 10 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision # Answer Key True or False 1. True 2. False 3. False 4. True 5. True Enumeration 1. Give the purposes of using transitions in your presentations. o Clarify the purpose of an activity o Connect one activity with what has gone before and what is happening next o Help participants know where they are at all times in the program’s flow o Give the trainer the opportunity to summarize and reinforce key points 2. Enumerate the techniques for energizing your sessions. o Elaborate and give examples related to what participants are seeing on the slides rather than just reading them aloud o Illustrate with interesting analogies and memorable stories o Capture attention by teaching once concept from one corner of the room and another from a different spot o Create games, contests and word puzzles to reinforce terms o Discuss future applications and possible obstacles with participants, so they are thinking about the present and the future 3. List the main objectives of your Closing. o To signal the end of your speech o To summarize the material o To leave the audience with something memorable and worthwhile 4. List the things that an Opening should accomplish. o Forge a bond with the audience
  11. 11. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 11 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision # o Establish credibility and goodwill o Create interest in the subject o Preview the presentation by introducing your main points o Relate the topic to the audience o “Hook” the audience by grabbing their attention
  12. 12. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 12 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision # Job Sheet Title: Delivering an Effective Presentation Performance Objective: Given an audience and evaluators, the participant should be able demonstrate the required skills in effectively delivering presentations. Supplies/Materials: Equipment: Steps/Procedures: 1. Decide on a topic you can present in 10 minutes. 2. Formulate your objectives. 3. Outline the main points and sub points you will be presenting. 4. Review your outline and check for alignment with your objectives. 5. Gather and validate the facts you need for your main and sub points. Decide on which facts you will include in your presentation. 6. Assign how much time you will spend on each of the main points. 7. Refer to Information Sheet (Delivering Presentations) for the different methods you can use for your Opening and Closing. Create an appropriate hook and impactful closing. 8. Create your visual aids. It is recommended that you use MS Powerpoint. 9. Practice presenting. You may refer to Information Sheet 2.3-4 (Preparing for Presentations) for your practice methods and Information Sheet (Delivering Presentations) for your transitions and ways to energize your sessions. 10. Advise your trainer that you are ready to present. Your trainer will provide you with the next steps. Assessment Method: Demonstration
  13. 13. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 13 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision # Performance Criteria Checklist CRITERIA Yes No Did the presenter’s opening achieve the following:  Attract and focus attention of the audience  Put the speaker and audience at ease  Explain the purpose of the presentation and objectives  Give an overview of the presentation Did the presenter display the following:  Expertise of the subject matter  Communication of concepts with clarity (organized, coherent, and concise)  Use of strong transitions  Use of appropriate humor  Effective management of time  Use of appropriate gestures  Use of appropriate vocal dynamics  Effective management of visual aids Did the presenter wear appropriate attire? Did the presenter’s closing achieve the following:  Signal the end of the presentation  Summarize the material
  14. 14. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 14 of 14Developed by: BPAP Revision # Other Observations Comments/suggestions about the performance of the trainer:  Leave the audience with something memorable and worthwhile

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