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TM PLUS Preparing Presentations

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BPAP Training in the University of Makati

BPAP Training in the University of Makati

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  • 1. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 1 of 7Developed by: BPAP Revision # Information Sheet Preparing for Presentations Learning Objectives: After reading this Information Sheet, you should be able to: 1. identify key areas to prepare for in presentations, 2. properly prepare for presentations. Preparing for Presentations “Before everything else, getting ready is the secret of success” – Henry Ford A wise trainer would know that failing to prepare is preparing to fail. Even if you have excellent communication skills and know your topic like the back of your hands, without preparation, the whole presentation could come crashing down. Preparation is not just about the content of what you want to say, but everything else that is involved in the presentation from the structure of your topic, to your audience, and down to the environment. Listed below are ways and areas to properly prepare for in a presentation. A. Structure Prepare the structure of your talks carefully and logically, just as you would for a written report. Define what are:  The objectives of the talk – The objective of your presentation is the outcome you want to accomplish after the presentation. It drives the development of your presentation and helps in determining the main points you want to have in your succeeding slides. A well-defined objective will help you organize your presentation and make the session a smooth ride for your audience—not a bumpy one where information is scattered all around and your audience is left guessing on how to piece the information together.  The main points you want to make – write a draft of your presentation like that of a written report. Read and review the draft and you will find important things that you want the audience to catch. Doing this will aid you say the right things at the right time.  The irrelevant points on the subject that could be deleted – making a draft of your presentation will also help you eliminate some of the empty information that will only make your presentation longer but not add info needed…
  • 2. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 2 of 7Developed by: BPAP Revision #  The inconsistencies that need to be adjusted – When you review your presentation, you may notice some parts that need to be adjusted. These may be as simple as misplaced slides, wordy slides, or information that doesn’t match your objective.  Time frame allotted – This is a very important aspect of a presentation that most trainers and presenters fail to consider. When presenting, make sure that you know the time limit given for the talk so you can match it with your material. You do not want to rush your presentation when running out of time as this might cause you to lose important parts that you want to highlight or your audience may not absorb your message the way you want them to, all because you did not consider the time allotted. B. Audience Knowing the audience to which you will speak is an important factor in the success of your presentation. Since presentations are dialogues between you and your audience, the more you understand them, the better you can customize your presentation. Prepare for your audience by trying to determine your learner’s levels of knowledge. Effective trainers have different versions of their cases for different trainees. C. Environment The training environment can have a major effect on the amount of learning achieved. Even the best content delivered by the best trainers can fail if the environment doesn’t support the instruction Requirements vary with different training locations. Ensure that you have a complete and up to date checklist of items to be included in the preparation of the training event  Factors that might work against effectiveness include:  Too large and grand a room  Too small a room for division of the group into subgroups.  Inaccessibility of the training location for all learners  Failure to inform security of visiting learners or guest speakers  Basic Considerations in a Training Environment  Air Conditioning Temperature control  Rest Room availability  Comfortable seating  Note taking facilities
  • 3. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 3 of 7Developed by: BPAP Revision #  A visible clock  Telephones  Place for Visual Aid Equipment  The shape of the room and its relevance to seating and training techniques  Location and suitability of electrical outlets  Windows with coverings that can be shielded against glare D. Practice Rehearsing your presentation is a crucial step in a successful delivery. Rehearse your presentation—to yourself at first and then in front of some colleagues. The initial rehearsal should consider how the words and the sequence of visual aids go together. The act of coordinating audio-visual material and equipment with verbal act of instructing is difficult and challenging. Be sure that you rehearse as much of the presentation each time. If you don’t, specific parts will be smooth; while other parts may be delivered unevenly. Never read from a script or your manual. It is also unwise to have the talk written out in detail as a prompt sheet - the chances are you will not locate the thing you want to say amongst all the other text. You should know most of what you want to say - if you don't then you should not be giving the presentation! So prepare cue cards or note cards, which have key words and phrases (and possibly sketches) on them to remind you of major sections. Don't forget to number the cards in case you drop them. Remember to mark on your cards and the visual aids that go with them so that the right slide is shown at the right time. Ways to Rehearse  In Front of the mirror  Correct parts of the presentation that you noticed need work.  Make sure that you’re putting stress on the right words and sentences. Make sure your gestures serve to emphasize your message. See if you’re comfortable with what you see.  Tape-record speech  Used to test timing.
  • 4. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 4 of 7Developed by: BPAP Revision #  Where do you need to pause for emphasis? Which words were hard to pronounce? Which sentences were too long to say in one breath?  Videotape  Similar to tape, recording, and mirror. Quickest way to improve.  Deliver to a single person  Try to get someone to give an honest opinion.  Rehearse for a small group  Simulate speaking conditions.  Pay careful attention to how they react to you.  Practice at the site or arrive early  Get the lay of the land; find out what is needed for preparation.  Practice with using all the visual aids  How to best incorporate your visual aids in the presentation.  Practice with background noise  Turn on TV or radio to get used to distractions. E. Working with Nervousness/Stage Fright Stage fright is a good set of signals, but we don’t want anybody else to notice that we’re going through it. There are a lot of ways to control the outward manifestations. Being well prepared can help but you also have to consider controlling your Body, your Environment and your Material.  Controlling your body  Smile – nobody can tell you are trembling  Keep your hands out of your pockets – jingling coins or keys is a giveaway  If you are using notes, put them down on a table or podium. (if your hands are shaking)  Anchor yourself – stand still. Pacing or shifting from one foot to another makes it worse  Drop the fig leaf – let your hands hang comfortably at your sides  Use your hands to express yourself
  • 5. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 5 of 7Developed by: BPAP Revision #  Shift the spotlight to the group. Open with a question. Give you something to do- listen, write down responses. Gets you in the swing of things while the audience members focus on one another.  Owning the space  You need to realize that you have Power in a training situation.  You are the expert; people have come to work with you so that they can learn.  Even resistant members of the group will give you the benefit of the doubt for a while.  Try interacting with the group members as if they were in your living room at home. They are your guests.  It is your space, and you can set it up to your advantage.  Build a space –with seating arrangement, music, peripheral information, handouts and so on - that puts you at ease and the learners will no doubt relax as well.  Your material  The better you know your material, the more relaxed you will be.  Be sure to know the material backward and forward.
  • 6. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 6 of 7Developed by: BPAP Revision # Self-Check Enumeration: A. Enumerate three key areas to prepare for in presentations and explain the relevance of each area to the presentation. 1. 2. 3. B. Enumerate five ways to practice your presentation. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
  • 7. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 7 of 7Developed by: BPAP Revision # Answer Key Enumeration: A. 1. Structure – since you are the presenter, the audience expect that you know a lot about your material. Preparing the structure of your presentation will show mastery of the subject and will let you anticipate questions that might be asked by your audience. 2. Audience – understanding who your audience would be is key in adjusting and fitting your material to the group. Instead of providing general scenarios or examples, you can provide more specific ones to the target group having them relate to your topic more. 3. Environment – if you know the environment or venue of your presentation such as the layout of the room, materials and equipment provided, you can strategize your approach in presenting, vary your techniques or you can arrange the environment, such as the seats and tables to complement your presentation. B. 1. In front of the mirror 2. Tape-record speech 3. Videotape 4. Deliver to a single person 5. Rehearse for a small group 6. Practice at the site or arrive early 7. Practice with using all the visual aids 8. Practice with background noise

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