Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
TM PLUS Characteristics of an Effective Facilitator
TM PLUS Characteristics of an Effective Facilitator
TM PLUS Characteristics of an Effective Facilitator
TM PLUS Characteristics of an Effective Facilitator
TM PLUS Characteristics of an Effective Facilitator
TM PLUS Characteristics of an Effective Facilitator
TM PLUS Characteristics of an Effective Facilitator
TM PLUS Characteristics of an Effective Facilitator
TM PLUS Characteristics of an Effective Facilitator
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

TM PLUS Characteristics of an Effective Facilitator

71

Published on

BPAP Training in the University of Makati

BPAP Training in the University of Makati

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
71
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 1 of 9 Developed by: BPAP Revision # Information Sheet Characteristics of an Effective Facilitator Learning Objectives: After reading this Information Sheet, you should be able to: 1. describe the characteristics of an effective facilitator 2. describe the elements of quality communication 3. explain the five-step process of providing clear and complete instructions 4. identify the elements of effective questioning 5. explain how to provide feedback in various situations In facilitation, the learners are at the center of the learning experience. As the facilitator, your attitude in class should inspire energy, collaboration, and creativity. Even if the group is made up of individuals with different personalities and backgrounds, you should be able to relate to each one in a manner that makes them feel appreciated and successful in their learning endeavor. Characteristics of a Facilitator To make the most out of any learning event, a facilitator should have the following characteristics: Informed - Effective facilitators make it a point to gather data about their participants. They collect information that would clue them in on the learner’s background, current knowledge and skills, learning styles, and learning needs. Optimistic – Effective facilitators are not intimidated by displays of negative behavior such as pessimism, disinterest, timidity, and antagonism. They try to get the best out of each participant by focusing on the learning objectives and expected outcomes. Consensual – Effective facilitators help the participants reach a common ground when conflict arises. They strive to produce results that equally reflect the ideas supplied by all participants. Flexible – Effective facilitators can make last-minute adjustments to the lesson/session plan to accommodate the participants’ individual learning needs. Facilitators have a good grasp of different instructional strategies which they can use in place of what is planned. Understanding – Pressures in the workplace or at home may cause increased stress levels in class. Effective facilitators acknowledge this reality and know to not take negative behaviors personally.
  • 2. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 2 of 9 Developed by: BPAP Revision # Alert – Effective facilitators exhibit awareness to the group dynamics and the participants’ behaviors during group activities. They are attuned to how well the class is performing. Firm – Effective facilitators confidently assert themselves if the group’s discussion is diverted to a less relevant topic and needs to be placed back on track. Unobtrusive – Effective facilitators recognize that there are instances when they have to step back and let the participants test and try out the newly acquired knowledge and skills on their own (Bens, 2005). Using Quality Communication An effective facilitator exhibits and promotes quality communication. Quality communication keeps the learning climate positive and collaborative. It has four characteristics: 1. Interactive and Balanced Facilitators make it a point to engage all participants in a discussion. They do this by providing participants opportunities to ask questions, share their ideas and clarify other learners’ contributions. Facilitators are careful not to let one or two persons dominate the discussion. 2. Respectful Communication becomes effective when respect is maintained throughout the interaction or exchange of ideas. It is the facilitators’ responsibility to ensure that this happens. Respectful communication means that all ideas shared are duly acknowledged and are perceived as potentially useful. Participants should also avoid interrupting, ignoring, or putting down others. 3. Concrete An effective facilitator takes an input that is vague or too general and asks participants to make it more concrete. For example, if someone shares that “trainers should communicate well,” the facilitator should ask follow up questions to help the contributor develop the thought to a more precise idea. 4. Relevant Keeping communication relevant means that the participants’ contributions should help the group advance towards the learning outcome. This helps the group avoid getting sidetracked and wasting valuable time. However, it is not uncommon for participants to bring up a previous topic or a topic that has not yet been discussed. Facilitators should acknowledge and record these inputs and ask for the group’s agreement to take them up some other time (Kinlaw, 1996).
  • 3. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 3 of 9 Developed by: BPAP Revision # Providing Instructions The quality of the instructions provided by the facilitator may dictate how well participants perform and enjoy learning activities. You can provide clear and complete instructions by following a simple five-step process. 1. Explain the purpose or usefulness of the activity. 2. Provide directions verbally and visually. 3. Give an example so that the participants can better understand how to carry out the activity. 4. State exceptions or anything that may be out of scope (optional). 5. Ask participants if they have any questions. Example: “Our next activity will help us differentiate between Filipino and American communication styles. By understanding the differences, we’ll be able to effectively interact with our American customers [purpose]. We will divide the class into groups of five. Each group will be given two flipchart papers. You will be given ten minutes to list the Filipino communication style on one flipchart and the American communication style on the other [directions]. For example, you may write that Americans are frank and straightforward and Filipinos are more reserved [example]. If during your brainstorming you come up with cultural differences not related to communication such as “Americans are independent while Filipinos are family-oriented,” please write those down on a piece of paper. We’ll be taking them up at a later time [exception]. Do you have any questions before we begin [questions]?” Asking Effective Questions Effective questioning is an essential facilitation technique. By asking questions, the facilitator can gather information, verify an idea, check for understanding, relate ideas together, and encourage learners to participate. Effective questioning includes asking the right questions and asking the right person/s (Bens, 2005). 1. Asking the right question There are different question formats. ASK… IF YOU WANT TO… EXAMPLES
  • 4. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 4 of 9 Developed by: BPAP Revision # Fact-finding questions gather verifiable information such as who, what, when, where and how much. “What are the differences between presentation and facilitation?” Feeling-finding questions target the participants’ feelings, beliefs, values, and opinions. These have words like think and feel. “How do you feel about the hiring standards in the BPO industry?” Tell-me-more questions encourage the participant to give more information “Tell me more.” “Can you elaborate on that?” “Can you be more specific?” Best/least questions assess the extent of the participants’ needs and wants “What is the best thing about being a call center agent?” Third-party questions unmask the participants’ thoughts indirectly “Some people find that the hiring process is too time consuming. Can you relate to that concern?” “Magic wand” questions delve into people’s true desires by taking out obstacles from people’s minds “If money and time are no obstacle, where would you travel and why?” 2. Asking the right person/s IF YOU WANT TO… THEN… Stimulate everyone’s thinking Direct the question to the group Allow people to respond voluntarily or avoid putting an individual on the spot Ask a question such as “What experiences have any of you had with difficult customers?” Stimulate one person to think and respond Direct the question to that individual such as “How do you think should we handle this situation, Kathy?”
  • 5. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 5 of 9 Developed by: BPAP Revision # Tap the known resources of an “expert” in the group Direct the question to that person. “Mark, you have had a lot of experience in sales. What would you do to in this case?” Providing Appropriate Feedback Providing feedback is an integral part of facilitating learning events. This allows the facilitators to show learners that their contributions are valued and to provide guidance as well. One opportunity to provide feedback is during a guided discussion. In a guided discussion, you, the facilitator, throw a pre-defined question to the group, the group responds, and you provides supplementary information. When a participant shares his ideas, it’s important that you validate or affirm this. The facilitator can say “Thank you for sharing” or “That’s good” or “Great! Anyone else have a comment?” At times, the participant may give a simple or vague answer and the facilitator wants a more concrete answer. In cases like this, you can say affirming statements followed by another question to stimulate more thought. For example, you can say “Great start. Can you tell me more?” or “Yes, can you elaborate on that?” In situations when the participant’s response is incorrect, you may be tempted to agree with the wrong answer to remain supportive of the learner and to avoid conflict. Agreeing with an incorrect response is doing disservice to everyone involved. The recommended tactic is to affirm the participant but make it clear that the response provided is not accepted. You can say something like “I understand where you’re coming from. Let me rephrase the question…” or “I see what you mean. However, that relates more to…” (McCain & Tobey, 2004).
  • 6. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 6 of 9 Developed by: BPAP Revision # Self-Check Enumeration: Enumerate the characteristics of quality communication. 1. 2. 3. 4. Enumerate the steps in providing instructions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Enumerate the elements of effective questioning. 1. 2.
  • 7. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 7 of 9 Developed by: BPAP Revision # Answer Key Four characteristics of quality communication 1. Interactive and balanced 2. Respectful 3. Concrete 4. Relevant Steps in providing instructions 1. Explain the purpose 2. Provide directions 3. Give an example 4. State any exceptions 5. Ask participants if they have any questions Elements of effective questioning 1. Asking the right question 2. Asking the right person
  • 8. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 8 of 9 Developed by: BPAP Revision # Job Sheet Title: Demonstrate Facilitation Techniques Performance Objective: Given trainees and a learning activity relevant to your field of expertise, you should be able to facilitate this activity and demonstrate the characteristics of an effective facilitator and facilitation techniques. Supplies/Materials: Equipment: Steps/Procedures: 1. Select a learning activity that is related to your field of expertise 2. Prepare materials and resources to be used during the activity 3. Provide trainees instructions on how to execute the learning activity 4. Facilitate the activity 5. Facilitate a debriefing session/guided discussion to wrap up the activity Assessment Method: Demonstration using the Performance Criteria Checklist
  • 9. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 9 of 9 Developed by: BPAP Revision # Performance Criteria Checklist CRITERIA Yes No Was the facilitator  Informed?  Optimistic?  Consensual?  Flexible?  Understanding?  Alert?  Firm?  Unobtrusive? Was communication  Interactive and balanced?  Respectful?  Concrete?  Relevant? Did the facilitator provide clear and complete instructions? Did the facilitator ask effective questions? Did the facilitator provide appropriate feedback?

×