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Learner's Profile as we Manage

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BPAP Training in the University of Makati

BPAP Training in the University of Makati

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  • 1. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 1 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # Information Sheet Learner’s Profile as We Manage Learning Objectives: After reading this Information Sheet, you should be able to: 1. identify the different learner’s profiles through their characteristics, learning styles and thinking styles; 2. identify difficult learners; and 3. identify techniques on how to deal with different kinds of learners Not all students are the same and every class is different. That is why one managing approach may not be as effective in all types of class. Each class you will handle may have different personalities or profiles. What is a Learner’s Profile? A Learner’s Profile simply describes the characteristics of a trainee/learner in class. Knowing these characteristics will help us understand our trainees more and strategize better on how we can make learning happen. Since all our learners are adults, you will find learning about how they are as learners. Characteristics of Adults as Learners Adults are Self-directed This means they are control, and are involved in the how, when and what of their training, are preferred by adult learners. Learning for them needs to be democratic, participatory and collaborative. Adults are Practical Direct and practical application and relevance of what they are learning is important for adult learners. If a particular training workshop is not making a participants’ day to day job easier, or not adding to his repository of professional skills, he is likely to lose interest. Adults are Result-oriented An adult learner participates in a training program only if the same helps him achieve specific, concrete and immediate results.
  • 2. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 2 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # Adults are skeptical Adult learners bring with them several years of learning, established opinions, values and beliefs, which may conflict with the new information being meted out in a training program. Such learners are expected to be skeptical. They prefer to validate the new information they receive, before completely accepting it. Adults have an accumulated wealth of life experiences Existing knowledge and skills of adult learners allow them to quickly connect with new facts presented in a learning situation, which are related to their past experiences. They are able to better tackle practical learning activities by drawing on their prior knowledge of what is likely to work and what is not. Adults are intrinsically motivated Adult learners possess an internal energy, which makes them naturally desirous of seeking relevant information, knowledge, insight, and skill. Adults have limitations Adult Learners deal with several challenges in day-to-day life, which may interfere with their learning process. These limitations include: o Set habits and strong tastes o A great deal of pride, with different ways of showing it. o Preoccupations outside the learning environment (work and family responsibilities) o Logistical concerns such as transportation, social commitments, money etc, can be very tiring. o Age or a physical condition that interferes with quick learning. o Emotional barriers such as fear of a subject, or insufficient confidence due to prior bitter education-related experiences. o Pre-developed group behavior, which is consistent with their needs. o “Creature comforts” in room, furniture, equipment, and refreshments. Adults have individual differences Adult learners have their own rate of learning and style of learning that cannot be dismissed and must be respected. Adults are well aware that their intellectual ability, educational level, and personality may vary from that of other participants, and therefore take responsibility for their own success or failure at learning. Teaching strategies must anticipate and accommodate differing comprehension rates of learners.
  • 3. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 3 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # Adults have different thinking styles Each adult learner adopts one or more of the following thinking styles: o Reflective thinkers: tend to be subjective, and relate new learning to past experiences o Creative thinkers: tend to be creative with their new learning, using it to solve problems and create shortcuts o Practical thinkers: tend to assimilate only facts that they immediately apply to their work o Conceptual thinkers: tend to look at the big picture, and wish to learn how everything works even if not directly related to their job. Adults have different learning styles Each adult learner adopts one or more of the following learning styles: o Visual learners: learn best when the material is demonstrated and illustrated visually in the form of graphs, pictures, images, etc. o Auditory learners: learn best by hearing, i.e. listening to lectures and discussions o Kinesthetic learners: learn best with written material, practical application and activities o Environmental learners: learn best in an environment that they are comfortable in, such as room, seating, lighting etc. Strategies and Techniques in Managing Difficult Participants Participants can be tagged based on their predominant behavior. Below are some examples. 1. The Heckler In class you cannot expect all of your students to be supportive and behaved. That’s when a heckler comes in the picture. Hecklers are people who have fun making fun or trainers. These are people who will always have something to say and will, one way or another, try to outwit you. To Deal with a heckler, o Find merit, express agreement, move on o Throw the question back to him/her e.g. “You’ve obviously done something on this. Can you tell us what your views are?” o Deflect the question to the rest of the class for comments e.g. “How does the rest of the group feel?”
  • 4. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 4 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # o Wait for a misstatement of fact, and then throw it out to the class for discussion; o In general, enlist other participants as your “defenders”; o Use humor or self-depreciation to defuse belligerent comments 2. The nit-picker Nitpickers are those who like to complain a lot. They are also the kind who likes to watch your every move and criticize them. To Deal with a nit-picker, o Try to find out the exact nature of the complaint, and address the issue as best as you can; o Emphasize that the purpose of your presentation is to be positive and constructive; o Highlight the constraints you are facing; o Use peer pressure to stop the complaints from interrupting the lesson 3. The Chatterbox and Braggart Chatterboxes and Braggarts are the kind of trainees who can’t stop talking. These are people who find delight in sharing the things they know but the sharing becomes too excessive it disrupts the flow classes. To Deal with a chatterbox and braggart, o Wait until he/she takes a breath, thank, refocus, and move on; o Find merit, express appreciation, move on; o Slow him/her down with a tough question; o Jump in and ask the rest of the class to comment 4. The Whisperer Whisperers are those who speak with their fellow trainees while you are discussing. To deal with the whisperer, o Stop talking until the whisperer looks up, and ask him/her permission to continue o Alternatively, ask whisperers to share their discussion with the whole class;
  • 5. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 5 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # 5. The Silent Participant and the Bored Participant Silent and bored participants are the ones who usually disengage from the lessons. These are folks who choose to keep quiet and not participate in the activities because they lost interest. To deal with the silent participant and the bored participant; o Ask them questions, simpler ones for the silent and timid participants, more challenging ones for the bored participants 6. The Sleeper Sleepers are students who doze off in class. Whatever the reason, it is best to find out. For the sleeper o Leave them alone if they are not disturbing the class; they may have had a very tiring day; o If the snoring is disturbing the class, ask their neighbors to wake them up; engage them with simple questions, and keep them awake with constant eye contact and further questions if necessary. o Make it a point, after the class, to speak with the trainee about the behavior and help him/her come up with ways to solve the issue.
  • 6. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 6 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # Self Check Enumeration: Enumerate the 10 characteristics of Adult Learners 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Identification: _____________ 1. They learn best by hearing, i.e. listening to lectures and discussions _____________ 2. They tend to assimilate only facts that they immediately apply to their work _____________ 3. These students learn best in an environment that they are comfortable in, such as room, seating, lighting etc. _____________ 4. They learn best when the material is demonstrated and illustrated visually in the form of graphs, pictures, images, etc. _____________ 5. They learn best with written material, practical application and activities _____________ 6. They tend to be creative with their new learning, using it to solve problems and create shortcuts _____________ 7. They tend to be subjective, and relate new learning to past experiences _____________ 8. They tend to look at the big picture, and wish to learn how everything works even if not directly related to their job. Multiple Choice: Anna is in the middle of training when she notices:
  • 7. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 7 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # 1. One of her trainees dozes off and starts snoring. She should: a. Wait until he/she takes a breath, thank, refocus, and move on b. Call his attention and engage him with simple questions c. Find merit, express appreciation, move on d. None of the above 2. She notices three of her trainees have started their own discussion. She should: a. Stop talking until the trainees look up, and ask them permission to continue b. Highlight the constraints you are facing c. Deflect the question to the rest of the class for comments e.g. “How does the rest of the group feel?” d. None of the above 3. In the middle of her discussion one of her trainees violently reacts about an idea she brought up and started telling the class how ineffective she is as a trainer and that she should do her research. a) Stop talking until the trainee looks up, and ask him/her permission to continue b) Highlight the constraints you are facing c) Deflect the question to the rest of the class for comments e.g. “How does the rest of the group feel?” d) None of the above 4. She called on one of her trainees to answer a question and noticed that the trainee has spoken too much and has gone off topic. She should: a) Leave them alone b) Ask her to tell you more c) Ask the class, “How does the rest of the group feel?” d) Wait until he/she takes a breath, thank, refocus, and move on 5. As she goes along, she notices that one of her trainees has a blank stare and seems to have lost focus in the discussion. She better: a) Leave him/her alone b) Call his/her attention by asking him/her with a challenging question
  • 8. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 8 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # c) Ask the class, “How does the rest of the group feel?” d) Tell her classmates to keep an eye on her
  • 9. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 9 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # Answer Key Enumeration: 1. Self-directed 2. Practical 3. Result-oriented 4. Skeptical 5. Adults have an accumulated wealth of life experiences 6. Intrinsically motivated 7. Adults have limitations 8. Adults have individual differences 9. Adults have different thinking styles 10. Adults have different learning styles Identification: 1. Auditory learners 2. Practical thinkers 3. Environmental learners 4. Visual learners 5. Kinesthetic learners 6. Creative thinkers 7. Reflective thinkers 8. Conceptual thinkers Multiple Choice: 1. B 2. A 3. C 4. D 5. B
  • 10. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 10 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # TASK SHEET Title: Being an Effective Manager in Dealing with Different Learner’s Profiles Performance Objective: Given the different types of learners in a mock demo, you should be able to address and manage your trainees following the techniques provided in the information sheet. Supplies/Materials : White Board, Marker and Eraser, Chairs, Tables, Equipment : Computer, Projector, Any Lesson or Power point presentation Steps/Procedure: 1. Inform your trainer that you are ready for a demo. Your trainer will be in charge of assigning people to act as your trainees with different learner’s profiles. 2. Anticipate how you will deal with your trainees 3. Wait for your trainer to inform you that you may begin with your lesson 4. Once done, wait for your trainer for feedback then you may proceed to the next topic. Preparing Your Work Area and Operating the Equipment: Computer 1. Ensure that the computer is turned on and the monitor displays the login page.
  • 11. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 11 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # 2. Press CTRL + ALT + DEL on the computer keyboard to login. 3. Enter the username and password To log off from the computer: 1. Close all open programs or files. 2. Press CTRL + ALT + DEL on your computer keyboard. 3. Click “Log Off.” Safety Procedures Computer 1. Ensure that cables and plugs are secured to avoid tripping or slipping. 2. If equipment is damaged, notify your facilitator. 3. Do not eat or drink beside the computer. 4. Do not handle the computer with wet hands. 5. Do not forget to log off the computer after use. Assessment Method: Demonstration
  • 12. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 12 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # Performance Criteria Checklist CRITERIA YES NO Did you…. 1. Deal with the chatterbox or braggart properly by doing one of the following? o Wait until he/she takes a breath, thank, refocus, and move on; o Find merit, express appreciation, move on; o Slow him/her down with a tough question; o Jump in and ask the rest of the class to comment 2. Deal with the bored participant properly by doing one of the following? 3. Deal with the whisperer properly by doing one of the following? o Stop talking until the whisperer looks up, and ask him/her permission to continue o Alternatively, ask whisperers to share their discussion with the whole class; 4. Deal with the sleeper appropriately by doing one of the following? o Leave them alone if they are not disturbing the class; they may have had a very tiring day; o If the snoring is disturbing the class, ask their neighbors to wake them up; engage them with simple questions, and keep them awake with constant eye contact and further questions if necessary. o Make it a point, after the class, to speak with the trainee about the behavior and help him/her come up with ways to solve the issue.
  • 13. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 13 of 13Developed by: BPAP Revision # 5. Deal with Silent Participant appropriately by asking them simple questions? 6. Deal with the Bored Participant appropriately by asking them challenging questions? 7. Deal with the nit-picker appropriately by doing one of the following: o Try to find out the exact nature of the complaint, and address the issue as best as you can; o Emphasize that the purpose of your presentation is to be positive and constructive; o Highlight the constraints you are facing; o Use peer pressure to stop the complaints from interrupting the lesson 8. Deal with the Heckler appropriately by doing one of the following? o Find merit, express agreement, move on o Throw the question back to him/her e.g. “You’ve obviously done something on this. Can you tell us what your views are?” o Deflect the question to the rest of the class for comments e.g. “How does the rest of the group feel?” o Wait for a misstatement of fact, and then throw it out to the class for discussion; o In general, enlist other participants as your “defenders”; o Use humor or self-depreciation to defuse belligerent comments