Being an Effective Classroom Manager

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BPAP Training in UMak

BPAP Training in UMak

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  • 1. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 1 of 11Developed by: BPAP Revision # Pre-Self Check What is your classroom management profile? Instructions:  Read each statement carefully.  Write your response, from the scale below, on a sheet of paper.  Respond to each statement based upon either actual or imagined classroom experience.  Then, follow the scoring instructions below. It couldn't be easier! 1. = Strongly Disagree 2. = Disagree 3. = Neutral 4. = Agree 5. = Strongly Agree ___ (1) If a student is disruptive during class, I assign him/her to detention, without further discussion. ___ (2) I don't want to impose any rules on my students. ___ (3) The classroom must be quiet in order for students to learn. ___ (4) I am concerned about both what my students learn and how they learn. ___ (5) If a student turns in a late assignment, it is not my problem. ___ (6) I don't want to reprimand a student because it might hurt his/her feelings. ___ (7) Class preparation isn't worth the effort. ___ (8) I always try to explain the reasons behind my rules and decisions. ___ (9) I will not accept excuses from a student who is tardy. ___ (10) The emotional well-being of my students is more important than classroom control. ___ (11) My students understand that they can interrupt my lecture if they have a relevant question. ___ (12) If a student requests a hall pass, I always honor the request.
  • 2. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 2 of 11Developed by: BPAP Revision # Answer Key To score your question forms, add your responses to: Statements 1, 3, and 9. This is your score for the authoritarian style. Statements 4, 8 and 11. This is your score for the authoritative style. Statements 6, 10, and 12. This is your score for the laissez-faire style. Statements 2, 5, and 7. This is your score for the indifferent style.”
  • 3. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 3 of 11Developed by: BPAP Revision # Information Sheet Being an Effective Classroom Manager Learning Objectives: After reading this Information Sheet, you should be able to: 1. identify the key competencies of a classroom manager; and 2. identify methods for managing time in the classroom Classroom Management is a critical responsibility of every trainer. It entails procedures and instructional techniques that are used to establish and maintain a classroom environment, which is conducive to learning. The three main elements of classroom management are: Managing time in the classroom, Managing classroom environment, and Managing people/learners. Before you proceed, let’s first check the result is your current classroom management profile. Your score for each management style can range from 3 to15. A high score indicates a strong preference for that particular style. After you have scored your quiz, and determined your profile, read the descriptions of each management style. You may see a little bit of yourself in each one. As you gain teaching experience, you may find that your preferred style(s) will change. Over time, your profile may become more diverse or more focused. Also, it may be suitable to rely upon a specific style when addressing a particular situation or subject. A successful trainer is one who can evaluate a situation and then apply the appropriate style. Finally, remember that the intent of this exercise is to inform you and arouse your curiosity regarding classroom management styles.” Competencies of a Classroom Manager Now that you know what kind of management style you have, let’s take a deeper look at each. The four main classroom management profiles are discussed below: 1. Authoritarian The authoritarian trainer places firm limits and controls on the students. Students will often have assigned seats for the entire training/course. The seats are usually arranged in straight rows and there are no deviations. Students are expected to come to class on time, and maintain silence throughout the class. This trainer neither likes to be
  • 4. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 4 of 11Developed by: BPAP Revision # interrupted, nor encourages any verbal exchange and discussion amongst the students. This trainer prefers vigorous discipline and expects swift obedience. Failure to obey usually results in disciplinary action. In this classroom, students need to follow directions and not ask why. The authoritarian trainer gives no indication that he/she cares for the students. Mrs. Doe is a good example of an authoritarian teacher. Her students receive praise and encouragement infrequently, if at all. Also, she makes no effort to organize activities. She feels that these special events only distract the students from learning. Mrs. Doe believes students need only listen to her lecture to gain the necessary knowledge. Students in this class are likely to be reluctant to initiate activity, since they may feel powerless. Mrs. Doe tells the students what to do and when to do it. She makes all classroom decisions. Therefore, her style does little to increase achievement motivation or encourage the setting of personal goals. A student reacts to this teaching style: “I don’t really care for this teacher. She is really strict and doesn’t seem to want to give her students a fair chance” 2. Authoritative The authoritative trainer places limits and controls on the students but simultaneously encourages independence. This trainer often explains the reason behind the rules and decisions, and if a student is disruptive, offers a polite, but firm, reprimand. This trainer sometimes metes out discipline but only after careful consideration of the circumstances. The authoritative trainer is also open to considerable verbal interaction, including critical debates. The students know that they can interrupt the trainer if they have a relevant question or comment. This environment offers the students the opportunity to learn and practice communication skills. Ms. Smith exemplifies the authoritative teaching style. She exhibits a warm and nurturing attitude toward the students and expresses genuine interest and affection. Her classroom abounds with praise and encouragement. She often offers positive remarks to students. This authoritative teacher encourages self-reliant and socially competent behavior and fosters higher achievement motivation. Often, she
  • 5. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 5 of 11Developed by: BPAP Revision # will guide the students through a project, rather than lead them. A student reacts to this teaching style: “I like this trainer. She is fair and understands that students can’t be perfect. She is the kind of teacher you can talk to without being put down or feeling embarrassed.” 3. Laissez-faire The laissez-faire trainer places few demand or controls on the students. “Do your own thing” describes this classroom. This trainer accepts the student’s impulses and actions and is less likely to monitor their behavior. Mr. Jones uses a laissez-faire style. He strives to not hurt the students’ feelings and has difficulty saying no to a student or enforcing rules. If a student disrupts the class, Mr. Jones may assume that he is not giving the student enough attention. When a student interrupts a lecture, Mr. Jones accepts it with the belief that the student must surely have something valuable to add. When he does offer discipline, it is likely to inconsistent. Mr. Jones is very involved with his students and cares for them very much. He is more concerned with the students' emotional well-being than he is with classroom control. He sometimes bases classroom decisions on his students’ feelings rather than on their academic concerns. Mr. Jones wants to be the students' friend. He may even encourage contact outside the classroom. He has a difficult time establishing boundaries between his professional life and his personal life. However, this overindulgent style is associated with students’ lack of social competence and self-control. It is difficult for students to learn socially acceptable behavior when the teacher is so permissive. With few demands placed upon them, these students frequently have lower motivation to achieve. Regardless, students often like this teacher. A student reacts to this teaching style: “This is a pretty popular teacher. You don't have to be serious throughout the class. But sometimes things get out of control and we learn nothing at all.”
  • 6. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 6 of 11Developed by: BPAP Revision # 4. Indifferent The indifferent trainer is not very involved in the classroom. This trainer places few demands, if any, on the students and appears generally uninterested. This trainer does not take the necessary preparation time for instructional activities and may even use the same materials, year after year. Also, classroom discipline is lacking. This trainer may lack the skills, confidence, or courage to discipline students. The students sense and reflect the teacher's indifferent attitude. Accordingly, very little learning occurs. In this aloof environment, the students have very few opportunities to observe or practice communication skills. With few demands placed on them and very little discipline, students have low achievement motivation and lack self-control. According to one student: “This trainer can't control the class and we never learn anything in there. There is hardly ever homework and people rarely bring their books.” Mrs. Johnson is a good example of an indifferent trainer. She uses the same lesson plans every year, never bothering to update them. For her, each day is the same. She lectures for the first twenty minutes of class. Sometimes she will show a film or a slideshow. When she does, it becomes a substitute for her lecture, not a supplement. If there is any time left (and there always is) she allows students to study quietly and to talk softly. As long as they don't bother her, she doesn't mind what they do. As far as she is concerned, the students are responsible for their own education. Managing Classroom Time Effectively “I wish I had more time!” “If only I could manage my time better!” Do the above statements echo your time related woes as a trainer? If yes, you are not alone! Teaching comprises of several time-consuming activities, and the paucity of time is one of the biggest challenges that you will face as trainers. Classroom Time Categorization The first step to maximizing time resource in the classroom is to understand how time in the classroom can be best divided for various activities for optimum utilization. Effective time allocation in a classroom is
  • 7. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 7 of 11Developed by: BPAP Revision # critical in helping students achieve learning goals and in making the classroom a pleasant place to be for trainers and students alike. Time Management is a key element of Classroom Management, and as such involves curriculum planning, organizing routine procedures, organizing resources; monitoring and recording student progress; and maintaining student behavior related problems to a minimum. Therefore, it follows, that a good instructional program requires efficient use of time. Methods for Managing Time in the Classroom Classroom time management is the bigger picture, of which meeting daily class objectives is a part. Remember that you are teaching a course and not just a one-day class. This way, you will remain focused on the learning objectives of the complete course as you plan your lessons and your schedule.  Define training objectives, activities and exercises for the day: Establish and prioritize activities for the day and also share with your students the training objectives for the day. Additionally, provide an outline of the activities and exercises you intend to do and the amount of time allotted for each activity.  Identify potential training problems: When planning your lessons, make sure to review your material thoroughly and do the exercises and problem sets yourself first in order to find out potential problems and exercises that may cause delay.  Identify timekeeping issues as you prepare your lesson: Before you enter the classroom, you should have a fair estimate of how long a particular discussion will last; the ensuing follow-up questions; and the points that result from the activity. Allow more time for complex or difficult concepts and exercises.  Stay aware of the time as you train: Take a quick look at your watch or clock from time to time to ensure you’re not running behind. Mark your lesson plan with indicators of the approximate times you expect to spend on specific topics.  Act as moderator for discussions in the classroom: As a moderator, your role is to move the discussion at the right pace and in the right direction, thereby saving time.  Lesson Plan: Planning and shaping a lesson begins much before the actual delivering of it in a classroom. Trainers think over what they must do in the class, and also what their students must do. Take the breaks as per your lesson plan, and start on time after the breaks. Late returns will see that you start on time and will accordingly adjust their behavior.
  • 8. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 8 of 11Developed by: BPAP Revision # Classroom management, as applied to training, involves everything that a trainer must do to carry out his/her teaching objectives. It includes preparation of plans and materials, structuring of activities into time blocks, direct teaching of skills and subject matter, grouping of pupils to provide for the most efficient use of teacher and pupil time, plans for transition periods--changing from one activity to another or from one place to another- -pupil involvement and motivation, and adequate control of pupil behavior. Therefore, classroom management is a process that entails actions taken to create an environment that supports and facilitates academic and social– emotional learning. Classroom management as a process also consists of key tasks that trainers must attend to in order to development an environment conducive to learning. These tasks include: (1) Organizing the physical environment, (2) Establishing rules and routines, (3) Developing caring relationships, (4) Implementing engaging instruction and (5) Preventing and responding to discipline problems. Failure to address classroom management issues leads to frustration, ineffectiveness and failure. In contrast, effective classroom management results in the coupling of order and learning.
  • 9. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 9 of 11Developed by: BPAP Revision # Self Check Identification: Identify the classroom management profile by reading the statements below: ___________ 1. These trainers enjoy their students but place few controls on them. ___________ 2. These trainers firmly redirect disruptive students but do not yell or assign overly punitive consequences for misbehavior. ___________ 3. These trainers show little control and little student involvement. ___________ 4. Students view them as cold and overly strict. ___________ 5. Such trainers tightly control their classrooms but show little involvement with students. ___________ 6. These trainers are indulgent and refrain from disciplining students for misbehavior. ___________ 7. These trainers seek strong control and little opposition from students. ___________ 8. These trainers reuse the same lesson plans over and over and do not allow extra activities like field trips. ___________ 9. These trainers enjoy being the "cool teacher" -- possibly at their students' peril. ___________ 10. These trainers place limits on students' behavior but encourages students to think and act independently. Multiple Choice: 1. John says his trainer is fair and understands that students can’t be perfect. She is the kind of teacher you can talk to without being put down or feeling embarrassed. What classroom management profile does John’s trainer have? a. Authoritarian b. Laissez-Faire c. Authoritative d. Indifferent
  • 10. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 10 of 11Developed by: BPAP Revision # 2. Joanna is attending Mr. Johnson’s class. She says he is really strict and doesn’t seem to want to give her students a fair chance. What kind of a trainer is Mr. Johnson? a. Authoritarian b. Laissez-Faire c. Authoritative d. Indifferent 3. Ms. Keen’s student says she is a pretty popular teacher but sometimes things get out of control and her students learn nothing at all. a. Indifferent b. Laissez-Faire c. Authoritative d. Authoritarian 4. A student says there is hardly ever homework and people rarely bring their books. a. Indifferent b. Laissez-Faire c. Authoritative d. Authoritarian Enumeration: Enumerate 3 Methods for Managing Time in the Classroom 1. 2. 3.
  • 11. Trainers Methodology Plus Facilitate Learning Sessions Date Developed: September 2012 Document No: Issued by: Page 11 of 11Developed by: BPAP Revision # Answer Key Identification: 1. Laissez-Faire 2. Authoritative 3. Indifferent 4. Authoritarian 5. Authoritarian 6. Laissez-Faire 7. Authoritarian 8. Indifferent 9. Laissez-Faire 10. Authoritative Multiple Choice: 1. C 2. A 3. B 4. A Enumeration: Enumerate 5 Methods for Managing Time in the Classroom 1. Define training objectives, activities and exercises for the day: 2. Identify potential training problems: 3. Identify timekeeping issues as you prepare your lesson: 4. Stay aware of the time as you train: 5. Act as moderator for discussions in the classroom: 6. Follow your Lesson Plan