Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model
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Introduction to WEBQUEST & Language Learning: Proposal of a WEB2QUEST model

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  • The WebQuest strategy for integrating the World Wide Web into classroom learning was launched in early 1995 by Professor Bernie Dodge at San Diego State University with early input from Tom March. A WebQuest has been defined as …. This definition has been refined over the years, and adapted for various different disciplines Tom March had the opportunity to work closely with Dodge for five years, as student and research fellow, and has regularly produced new WebQuests and other related formats (March, 1997) in an attempt to extend our understanding of what facilitates effective Web-based learning.
  • Webquests projects were designed to bring together the most effective instructional practices, theories and models into one integrated student activity: critical thinking, cooperative learning, authentic assessments, technology integration, scaffolding model, cognitive and constructivist theory (Dodge et al., 1995)
  • Three Domains . Dodge identified three domains to assist in developing web-enhanced, information-rich learning environments : inputs (i.e., articles, resources, experts and other information sources), transformations (i.e., high-level activities such as analysis, synthesis, problem solving and decision-making), and outputs (i.e., products such as presentations, reports, and web publishing). He points out that students need scaffolding in each of these domains such as quality resource links, compelling problems, and production templates to assist in building understandings Transformational Learning . Beyond traditional term papers and tests, WebQuests require students to connect their understanding of information to meaningful situations through original products for authentic audiences. The most effective WebQuest communication products provide students with opportunities to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information and alternative perspectives several learning theories and concepts are embedded in WebQuests. These concepts and ideas relate to critical thinking skills, second language acquisition, and social constructivism to name few Constructivism Learning principles involved Learning through authentic tasks Negotiating meanings through face-to-face interaction in the target language Constructing knowledge of the structures of the target language Constructing knowledge of a particular subject Developing an expertise on a subject Promoting cooperative and collaborative learning Participating in a learner-centered activity Critical thinkingDeveloping analysis, synthesis, and evaluation skills, considered the higher-thinking skills on the Bloom’s taxonomy Making informed decisions based on information obtained Developing critical reading skills Learning to write critically Developing reasoning skills Negotiating ideas critically Learning to evaluate information from the Internet
  • Introduction to Quest The introduction is a short paragraph written in second person that introduces the students to the activity. It should catch the students’ attention, provide background information and include the role being taken in the quest. For example, “You just found out your best friend is an alien from another planet and need to explain Christmas . . . “ or “Your favorite author will be visiting . . . .” WebQuest Task The task is what should be accomplished through the WebQuest. It typically starts with a paragraph, but may also contain a list of what the students will be required to do. Another primary component of the task section is to explain to the students what is expected to be created for evaluation and any specific tools, such as PowerPoint, that will be used to create them. Step-by-Step Process The process is a logical, step-by-step guide for the students to follow. It should provide responsibilities, either for individuals or for each group member. It should also suggest to students how to organize or save their information for the final product. This is also the section where links are provided to specific Internet sites. These sites should be investigated in advance for content, relevance and even availability from school. The links would be placed as part of the steps involved in the process so students know where to go to look for the information. Evaluation Using Rubrics The evaluation section contains the rubric with which students will be evaluated. This could be for an individual or group. It could also be a self-evaluation, overall evaluation or a combination as deemed appropriate by the teacher. Though the evaluation style is objective it should be written in such a way that students understand how they will be evaluated. Conclusion or Summary of WebQuest The conclusion is an overall summary of the WebQuest. It should provide students with a way to reflect about the process. Also, it should provide advanced, related questions that might be investigated at another time. Throughout the WebQuests, students should be engaged through second person writing, as if the lesson speaks directly to them. By following this basic form the WebQuest also provides a structure that is easy for teachers to design and for students to follow. An introduction that sets the stage and provides some background information. A task that is doable and interesting. A set of information sources needed to complete the task. Many (though not necessarily all) of the resources are embedded in the WebQuest document itself as anchors pointing to information on the World Wide Web. Information sources might include web documents, experts available via e-mail or realtime conferencing, searchable databases on the net, and books and other documents physically available in the learner's setting. Because pointers to resources are included, the learner is not left to wander through webspace completely adrift. A description of the process the learners should go through in accomplishing the task. The process should be broken out into clearly described steps. Some guidance on how to organize the information acquired. This can take the form of guiding questions, or directions to complete organizational frameworks such as timelines, concept maps, or cause-and-effect diagrams as described by Marzano (1988, 1992) and Clarke (1990). A conclusion that brings closure to the quest, reminds the learners about what they've learned, and perhaps encourages them to extend the experience into other domains.
  • The task is what should be accomplished through the WebQuest. It typically starts with a paragraph, but may also contain a list of what the students will be required to do. Another primary component of the task section is to explain to the students what is expected to be created for evaluation and any specific tools, such as PowerPoint, that will be used to create them. Deep questions to address Problems to be solved Positions to be debated Alternatives to be explored Products to be created
  • assess the value of your WQ before students use it
  • Through wq language students acquire language competence but also content information
  • Introduction to Quest The introduction is a short paragraph written in second person that introduces the students to the activity. It should catch the students’ attention, provide background information and include the role being taken in the quest. For example, “You just found out your best friend is an alien from another planet and need to explain Christmas . . . “ or “Your favorite author will be visiting . . . .” WebQuest Task The task is what should be accomplished through the WebQuest. It typically starts with a paragraph, but may also contain a list of what the students will be required to do. Another primary component of the task section is to explain to the students what is expected to be created for evaluation and any specific tools, such as PowerPoint, that will be used to create them. Step-by-Step Process The process is a logical, step-by-step guide for the students to follow. It should provide responsibilities, either for individuals or for each group member. It should also suggest to students how to organize or save their information for the final product. This is also the section where links are provided to specific Internet sites. These sites should be investigated in advance for content, relevance and even availability from school. The links would be placed as part of the steps involved in the process so students know where to go to look for the information. Evaluation Using Rubrics The evaluation section contains the rubric with which students will be evaluated. This could be for an individual or group. It could also be a self-evaluation, overall evaluation or a combination as deemed appropriate by the teacher. Though the evaluation style is objective it should be written in such a way that students understand how they will be evaluated. Conclusion or Summary of WebQuest The conclusion is an overall summary of the WebQuest. It should provide students with a way to reflect about the process. Also, it should provide advanced, related questions that might be investigated at another time. Throughout the WebQuests, students should be engaged through second person writing, as if the lesson speaks directly to them. By following this basic form the WebQuest also provides a structure that is easy for teachers to design and for students to follow. An introduction that sets the stage and provides some background information. A task that is doable and interesting. A set of information sources needed to complete the task. Many (though not necessarily all) of the resources are embedded in the WebQuest document itself as anchors pointing to information on the World Wide Web. Information sources might include web documents, experts available via e-mail or realtime conferencing, searchable databases on the net, and books and other documents physically available in the learner's setting. Because pointers to resources are included, the learner is not left to wander through webspace completely adrift. A description of the process the learners should go through in accomplishing the task. The process should be broken out into clearly described steps. Some guidance on how to organize the information acquired. This can take the form of guiding questions, or directions to complete organizational frameworks such as timelines, concept maps, or cause-and-effect diagrams as described by Marzano (1988, 1992) and Clarke (1990). A conclusion that brings closure to the quest, reminds the learners about what they've learned, and perhaps encourages them to extend the experience into other domains.
  • A TalenQuest is a WebQuest with a focus on foreign language learning. (Talen is Dutch for Languages). It is a venture that leads to a product and, in the process, triggers, in a natural way a variety of effective learning activities http://www.feo.hvu.nl/koen2/Talenquest/index-l.htm http://members.aol.com/adrmoser/tips/mwq.html
  • . Assisting the development of web-enhanced & information-rich learning environments is what Dodge wanted with the creation of web1quests The WebQuest's biggest requirement is to remain open to the implementation of emerging technology
  • Web 2.0 enables: • Socialisation - Through socialisation our students can use the language and skills they are learning to build networks and develop relationships with real people. • Collaboration - They can work together with others to construct and share real knowledge. • Creativity - They can create genuine products, in a wide range and combination of media to high standards, that will have a real audience. • Authenticity - The tasks and activities they do and the people they communicate with to do them are real and motivating. • Sharing - They can share what they create and learn from each other
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  • Web
  • Long's interaction hypothesis (1996) : “ comprehensible input ” & “ negotiated meanin g training in grammar and vocabulary alone does not result in linguistic competence with no interaction (Rüschoff & Ritter 2001
  • A useful summary of the requisite conditions for successful language learning is provided by Egbert et al (1999), who drew on similarities in SLA research to come up with eight key factors
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