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Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2
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Gene patenting grammar practice copy 2

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Using the present, the present perfect, the passive voice correctly.

Using the present, the present perfect, the passive voice correctly.

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    • 1. Grammar practice English 212
    • 2. Choose the correct answer Gene Patenting: What Do You Think?Gene patenting is a touchy subject, and I was recentlyreminded / recently reminded of it when I heard that theAmerican Civil Liberties Union sues /is suing abiotechnology company. Okay, lets go back to basics. What’sa patent? Patents are what inventors get to ensure that noone copies / is copying their ideas, makes / is makingmoney from them and/or takes / is taking all the credit. Answers
    • 3. Choose the correct answer Gene Patenting: What Do You Think?Gene patenting is a touchy subject, and I was recentlyreminded / recently reminded of it when I heard that theAmerican Civil Liberties Union sues /is suing abiotechnology company. Okay, lets go back to basics. What’sa patent? Patents are what inventors get to ensure that noone copies / is copying their ideas, makes / is makingmoney from them and/or takes / is taking all the credit. AnswersGene patenting is a touchy subject, and (1)I was recentlyreminded of it when I heard that the American Civil LibertiesUnion (2)is suing a biotechnology company. Okay, lets go backto basics. What’s a patent? Patents are what inventors get toinsure that no one (3)copies their ideas, (4)makes money fromthem and/or (5)takes all the credit.
    • 4. Choose the correct answer Gene Patenting: What Do You Think? Gene patenting is a touchy subject, and I was recently reminded / recently reminded of it when I heard that the American Civil Liberties Union sues /is suing a biotechnology company. Okay, lets go back to basics. What’s a patent? Patents are what inventors get to ensure that no one copies / is copying their ideas, makes / is making money from them and/or takes / is taking all the credit. AnswersGene patenting is a touchy subject, and (1)I was recentlyreminded of it when I heard that the American Civil LibertiesUnion (2)is suing a biotechnology company. Okay, lets go backto basics. What’s a patent? Patents are what inventors get toinsure that no one (3)copies their ideas, (4)makes money fromthem and/or (5)takes all the credit. 1: Passive sentence: The subject (“I”) of this sentence is not the “doer” of the action. The subject receives the action. 2. Present progressive:Action in progress. 3,4,5. Present simple: Repetitive action.
    • 5. For example, a company (6)is inventing / invents aspecial bicycle helmet with super-shock protection that theydeveloped out of years of research; their patent (which theyapply for) (7)gives / is giving them exclusive rights of theproduction and sales of this helmet model that they (8) put /putted so much work into.   Answers
    • 6. For example, a company (6)is inventing / invents aspecial bicycle helmet with super-shock protection that theydeveloped out of years of research; their patent (which theyapply for) (7)gives / is giving them exclusive rights of theproduction and sales of this helmet model that they (8) put /putted so much work into.   Answers For example, a company (6) invents a special bicyclehelmet with super-shock protection that they developed outof years of research; their patent (which they apply for)(7)gives them exclusive rights of the production and sales ofthis helmet model that they put so much work into.  
    • 7. For example, a company (6)is inventing / invents aspecial bicycle helmet with super-shock protection that theydeveloped out of years of research; their patent (which theyapply for) (7)gives / is giving them exclusive rights of theproduction and sales of this helmet model that they (8) put /putted so much work into.   Answers For example, a company (6) invents a special bicyclehelmet with super-shock protection that they developed outof years of research; their patent (which they apply for)(7)gives them exclusive rights of the production and sales ofthis helmet model that they put so much work into.  6,7: Present Simple: The company is not “inventing” the bicycle at this verymoment.8. Irregular past verb: Past of “put is “put”
    • 8. This is called intellectual property rights. Secure in theirknowledge that they (9) may be able / will be able to get apatent, researchers, companies and individuals (10) invest /are investing their time, money, and brain power to researchand develop new products, ideas, etc. Patents generally (11) arelasting / last for twenty years, and patenting rights (12)function / functions generally the same way in both Canadaand the US.  Answers
    • 9. This is called intellectual property rights. Secure in their knowledge that they (9) may be able / will be able to get a patent, researchers, companies and individuals (10) invest / are investing their time, money, and brain power to research and develop new products, ideas, etc. Patents generally (11) are lasting / last for twenty years, and patenting rights (12) function / functions generally the same way in both Canada and the US.   Answers This is called intellectual property rights. Secure in theirknowledge that they (9) will be able to get a patent,researchers, companies and individuals (10) invest their time,money, and brain power to research and develop new products,ideas, etc. Patents generally (11) last for twenty years, andpatenting rights (12) function / functions generally the sameway in both Canada and the US. 
    • 10. This is called intellectual property rights. Secure in their knowledge that they (9) may be able / will be able to get a patent, researchers, companies and individuals (10) invest / are investing their time, money, and brain power to research and develop new products, ideas, etc. Patents generally (11) are lasting / last for twenty years, and patenting rights (12) function / functions generally the same way in both Canada and the US.   Answers This is called intellectual property rights. Secure in theirknowledge that they (9) will be able to get a patent,researchers, companies and individuals (10) invest their time,money, and brain power to research and develop new products,ideas, etc. Patents generally (11) last for twenty years, andpatenting rights (12) function / functions generally the sameway in both Canada and the US. 9: High degree of certainty: We use “will” and not “may” to express highcertainty.10, 11, 12: Present Simple : Repetitive (habitual) action.
    • 11. Most consumer products (13) are patented / is patented, butthere is controversy over whether naturally occurring, or livingorganisms can be patented. As it stands, DNA can be patented.Some “types” of cattle (14) have been bred / were bred to beideal for meat; biotechnology or agriculture companies(15 )could/can actually patent the entire set of DNA (called agenome) of that animal so that another farm or meat businesscannot raise animals with the same favorable DNA. Livestock(16) can now clone / can now be cloned to reproduce optimalgenomes. If you live in the US or EU, you (17) Could /ought tobe eating cloned meat or drinking milk from a cloned cow,which is something to ponder.  Justification
    • 12. Most consumer products (13) are patented / is patented, butthere is controversy over whether naturally occurring, or livingorganisms can be patented. As it stands, DNA can be patented.Some “types” of cattle (14) have been bred / were bred to beideal for meat; biotechnology or agriculture companies(15 )could/can actually patent the entire set of DNA (called agenome) of that animal so that another farm or meat businesscannot raise animals with the same favorable DNA. Livestock(16) can now clone / can now be cloned to reproduce optimalgenomes. If you live in the US or EU, you (17) Could /ought tobe eating cloned meat or drinking milk from a cloned cow,which is something to ponder.  Justification13. Subject verb agreement: The subject “Most consumer products” is plural.14. Present Perfect : Unspecified time.15. Ability: Ability in the present (“actually”) requires “can” and not “could”.16. Passive voice: The subject “Livestock” receives the action.17. Possibility: Only “could” works as “ought to” implies obligation whichwould be illogical in this context.
    • 13.   So, to clarify, whole living animals (18)are not patented /were not patented, their DNA is. DNA that would naturally(19) occurs / occur without human influence is notpatentable. DNA (20)is becoming /becomes patentablewhen genetic engineers (21) had isolated / have isolatedor changed it to produce a unique form that would not befound in nature. DNA patents are on the rise as geneticistsmake more and more discoveries; currently over threemillion patents relating to (22) DNA have been appliedfor / were applied for. Justification
    • 14.   So, to clarify, whole living animals (18)are not patented /were not patented, their DNA is. DNA that would naturally(19) occurs / occur without human influence is notpatentable. DNA (20)is becoming /becomes patentablewhen genetic engineers (21) had isolated / have isolatedor changed it to produce a unique form that would not befound in nature. DNA patents are on the rise as geneticistsmake more and more discoveries; currently over threemillion patents relating to (22) DNA have been appliedfor / were applied for. Justification18. Passive sentence: Context requires the present.19. Modal form : A verb that comes after a modal never takes “s”.20. Present simple: Habitual / fact.21. Present perfect: Past connected to the present.22. Present Perfect: Past connected to the present.

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