“A Brief History Of
               Growing Up Online”
                         SXSW Interactive 2009




Sunday, March 15,...
“We were the forerunners of blogs, LiveJournal, MySpace, the
   whole damn thing. We bought domains with pocket money, we
...
What This Is
                  • A little retrospective of the history of
                         “blogging” and online j...
What This Isn’t

                  • Cautionary tales about how scary it is to
                         be a woman or youn...
Back In The Day..
                    • Blogs were “online journals” or “diaries”
                    • Had to have some t...
Old School In The
                               Hizzouse
                 • Justin Hall, Links.net
                 • Ell...
And now...

            • Living your life in the open is the norm and
                   the standard
            • Overs...
But...why?

                • Community
                • Self Expression
                • Attention (the dirty word!)
  ...
Questions
                    •     Why are people so uncomfortable with
                         the idea that others are...
Meet The Panelists

                  • Gala Darling
                  • Anna Genoese
                  • Mark Shrayber
  ...
Reading List
                    • “The Unrecognizable Internet of 1996”,
                         Slate, http://www.slate...
Let’s Rap


                    • Maria Diaz, mariamdiaz@gmail.com,
                    • http://onesharpbroad.com


Sunda...
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A Brief History of Growing Up Online

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On March 14, 2009 I had a presentation on old school online journalling and blogging, mostly from teenage girls at SXSW 2009. We also touch upon the issues of "overshare" and privacy.

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  • thanks for posting these slides. there's a video of the panel here: http://galadarling.com/article/live-at-sxswi-a-brief-history-of-growing-up-online
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  • I picked this ugly ass theme because this is what all of our web sites looked like then! Also, I don’t really know how to use Keynote.

    I’m going to be using some cheesy effects to remind us of what the web looked like in the late 90s, like this one...
  • This quote encapsulates the reason I wanted to bring this panel in the first place. It’s by Naomi Eve, who is a Phd student in Australia doing her dissertation on the “domain grrl” phenomenon.
  • This graphic here is the maidens of the heart webring, which we all appear to remember. I was not accepted because my online journal had too many swear words!

  • There were a few misconceptions about what this panel is about on the panel picker. Don’t think it’s really necessary to re-hash scary stories about being a woman or teen online. This panel is more about the positive things doing this has had for us and on how it’s affected our lives now, when everyone is doing the thing we were being made fun of before
  • Important to remember that the difference between blogs and diaries was at first distinct; a blog was a web page who’s main existence was to tell us about other web pages (S. Rosenberg’s article in Salon in 1999), online journals were longer and about the life of the owner; now both terms essentially mean the same thing

    Not possible to have a website without some technical skills; either free hosting (geocities, xoom, angelfire) or you had to know someone with a domain who could “host you” (the domain grrrl phenomenon)

    Anonymity: Web was not linked to “real life” like it is now; entirely possible to have a completely separate online existence, probably why so many teenagers were drawn to it.
  • The first true Web diary is generally credited to Canadian Carolyn Burke, who began hers in January of 1995. Justin Hall’s links.net started in 1994. Some other old school oversharers were Jennicam and Ana Voog . And here are a whole bunch of URLs also credited as one of the first, here are some of the teen girls who made it happen.

    It’s very likely that I will not know of any one who you think is a real blogging pioneer, but that’s the nature of the game!

  • Even Martha Stewart has a Twitter account. Everyone wants to blog and be a part of the community. How do we navigate a society where everything is obsessively documented? Our panelists will tell us how they have done it, oversharing since their teens and now living in the world as adults.
  • Which brings us to ....
  • What is the difference between the old school online journal and the new school blog? How has this affected your life now? Are you as open as you were before? And everyone asks that the result of the oversharing thinks “what will your grandkids think”? Our panelists know what it’s like to put so much of themselves online, how does it feel now?

    Our panelists can talk about their experiences online back then, what it was like when no one else was doing it and how they feel about the oversharing that exists now. Tell us when you posted your first journal, how many URLS they have.
  • All my panelists were picked for their old schoolness, for their reputation as oversharers. Let’s take a look at what their websites looked like in 1998! I wasn’t able to find Mark or Gala’s old sites on the wayback machine which is an interesting commentary on how a lot of this stuff is temporary and doesn’t get saved. So much of our history is gone.



  • A Brief History of Growing Up Online

    1. “A Brief History Of Growing Up Online” SXSW Interactive 2009 Sunday, March 15, 2009
    2. “We were the forerunners of blogs, LiveJournal, MySpace, the whole damn thing. We bought domains with pocket money, we doled out subdomains like they were candy, and we designed in colours of black, white, purple, red, and sometimes pink. We coded everything by hand, we tried all the latest in Javascript, and we bitched and ranted like nobody’s business. We were hosted between 1997(ish) and 2003(ish). We were aged between 13 and 21 (again, ish). We were girls - but there were boys too, if we let them in the clubhouse door.” -Naomi Eve Sunday, March 15, 2009
    3. What This Is • A little retrospective of the history of “blogging” and online journals • Props to the teen early adopters who started it all • This idea of “Overshare” and how it’s existed forever • Hash tag #overshare Sunday, March 15, 2009
    4. What This Isn’t • Cautionary tales about how scary it is to be a woman or young teen online • A how-to Sunday, March 15, 2009
    5. Back In The Day.. • Blogs were “online journals” or “diaries” • Had to have some technical skills to have a website • Could actually be anonymous (somewhat) • Lots of grown ups had online journals (diarist.net) but huge subculture of teens did it Sunday, March 15, 2009
    6. Old School In The Hizzouse • Justin Hall, Links.net • Elly.org • Jennicam • Ana Voog • narcissistic.org, triggerbaby.org, heartsick.org, glitter-stars.net, electrosuicide.net, overload.nu, december- rain.org, infective.net, contaminate.org, Sunday, March 15, 2009
    7. And now... • Living your life in the open is the norm and the standard • Overshare is big business • Blogging has evolved Sunday, March 15, 2009
    8. But...why? • Community • Self Expression • Attention (the dirty word!) • “Overshare” What does it even mean? Sunday, March 15, 2009
    9. Questions • Why are people so uncomfortable with the idea that others are willingly sharing information about themselves? • Is the backlash against oversharing and personal diaries sexist? • Is this a waste of time for young women? Was it a waste of time? Isn't all this technical know how better spent on political blogging, etc? Sunday, March 15, 2009
    10. Meet The Panelists • Gala Darling • Anna Genoese • Mark Shrayber • Sarah Wulfeck (1998), 2003 Sunday, March 15, 2009
    11. Reading List • “The Unrecognizable Internet of 1996”, Slate, http://www.slate.com/id/2212108/ • “After 10 Years of Blogs, The Future’s Brighter Than Ever”, Wired, http:// www.wired.com/entertainment/theweb/ news/2007/12/blog_anniversary • Naked On The Internet, Audacia Ray Sunday, March 15, 2009
    12. Let’s Rap • Maria Diaz, mariamdiaz@gmail.com, • http://onesharpbroad.com Sunday, March 15, 2009

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