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Campus Special Event Management Presentation 2012 IACLEA Conference
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Campus Special Event Management Presentation 2012 IACLEA Conference

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Margolis Healy & Associates managing partners Gary Margolis and Steven Healy presented Campus Special Events Management at the 2012 IACLEA Conference.

Margolis Healy & Associates managing partners Gary Margolis and Steven Healy presented Campus Special Events Management at the 2012 IACLEA Conference.

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  • 1. Security Planning & Management for Campus Special Events Steven Healy Dr. Gary Margolis
  • 2. Agenda • About MH&A • Legal Duties • Research and Trends • 10 Essential Areas • Event Management Basics© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 3. Legal Duties for Special Events While the precise contours of this duty will vary from state to state, institutions of higher education generally have a legal duty to: Act reasonably to provide a campus environment that is reasonably safe from foreseeable general criminal activity by students, employees, or third parties© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 4. Research • MH&A researched special event violence on campuses • Analyzed 20-plus special events over a 5 year period (2005 – 2010) • Uncovered trends and patterns Margolis, G., Healy, S., & Shtull, P. (2010): Special event management: Trends in violence on campus© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 5. Campus Special Events • High profile violent incidents at special events • Celebratory riots at athletic events • Disruptive attendees • Disputes about entry @ closed events • Fights, shootings, & stabbing during & after events© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 6. Fights, Stabbings & Shootings • Often associated with large student parties  UConn Spring Weekend  A 20-year-old University of Connecticut student died of head injuries from a fight outside a restaurant during Spring Weekend  JMU block party  “Some got in fights when other partiers accidentally bumped into them, she said. People with blood streaming down their faces and arms rushed past her.”© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 7. Fights, Stabbings & Shootings • Duquesne University (September 2006)  5 students shot following an on-campus party • Villanova University (November 2007)  Shots fired following a dance on campus • Florida Atlantic University (April 2008)  Shots fired at an on-campus Spring party© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 8. Fights, Stabbings & Shootings • Texas Southern (July 2009) 6 shot during on-campus event • Langston University (August 2009) 3 non-students shot following on- campus party • Diablo Valley College (March 2010) Shooting following a Rugby match© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 9. Campus Special Events Potential Lethal Mix • Students and non-students • Alcohol and other drugs • Egos • Security (Lack of or ill prepared)© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 10. Trends • Most violent incidents occur in the early morning hours • Each has a triggering event: argument, fights, anger, vengeance, jealousy, domestic related • Suspects are consistently male • Not clear if they all occur at non-school sponsored events, but they all have a link to student access to university space • Weapon of choice is a firearm© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 11. 10 Essential Areas 1. Multi-disciplinary approach 2. Event Pre-planning & Coordination 3. Special Event policies 4. Training for security personnel 5. Staffing© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 12. 10 Essential Areas 6. Use of students in event staffing 7. Venue Considerations 8. Off-campus events 9. After-action reviews 10.Use of NIMS & ICS framework© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 13. 1. Multi-disciplinary approach • Adopt a team approach to planning and managing special events • Likely members are: Campus public safety Student affairs Athletics Risk managers Others who “have a functional stake in the event” Students© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 14. 2. Event Pre-planning & Coordination • Planning is a critical phase of event management • Meet early and often • Overall goal is to develop an event plan that addresses all aspects of the event© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 15. 2. Event Pre-planning & Coordination • Conduct pre-event orientations • Conduct pre-event review of assignments • Training • Identify/mitigate hazards • Review schedule of event activities© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 16. 2. Event Pre-planning & Coordination Review • Venue/event diagram • Event specific policies and procedures • Event specific alcohol policies and procedures • Specific event ticketing and credentialing policies • Address needs in contracts with talent • Close coordination in & out • External Constituents (local police, public works, EMS, fire, etc.)© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 17. 3. Special Event Policies • Thresholds (types, size, triggers, liability) • Venues (academic, admin, res hall, multipurpose) • Alcohol/No-Alcohol • Guests (private/public) • Access • Security (type, staffing, costs)© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 18. 4. Training for Security Personnel • Identified as a significant shortfall • Lack of specialized crowd management training for campus public safety • Those involved in the wide range of security duties should have training • Access control, including credential checking, searching, stewarding, etc.© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 19. 4. Training for Security Personnel • Crowd management and control, including ejection, etc. • Patrolling and/or static positions • Emergency response • Traffic control© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 20. 5. Staffing • Peer security (students or others not considered professionals) • Contracted security officers or crowd management specialists (also known as event security) • Police officers in uniform or plain clothes© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 21. 5. Staffing How to staff • Generally, 1/100 for smaller events & venues • As venue size increases, strategic staffing becomes the rule© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 22. 5. Staffing Duties include • Protection of life and property • Prevention and detection of crime • Preventing or stopping breaches of the peace • Traffic regulation (within the legal powers provided by statute.) • Activation of a contingency plan© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 23. 6. Use of Students • Common for IHEs to use students and they can be used effectively • Peers can provide a less rigid security profile • Students must be appropriately trained and knowledgeable of their roles and responsibilities© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 24. 6. Use of Students Role • Security control at entrances and exits • Fire watch • Vehicle control© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 25. 7. Venue Considerations Is this venue right sized for the event? • Key points such as entrances and exits • Will barriers be used, and if so, where and what type? • VIP and performer areas • General thoroughfares • Strategic observation points to monitor the crowd© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 26. 8. Off-Campus Events • Venue selection and limitations • Pre-event touring, planning and coordination • Contractual obligations, related policies • Collaboration with local public safety • Selection of contract security© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 27. 9. After Action Reviews • Helpful to conduct “hot-wash” for most major events • Conduct after-action review for events where incident occurs  Who, what, where, how, why?  What will we do differently next time  Use other incidents as tabletop exercises for your planning group© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 28. 10. Use of NIMS/ICS • Planning Tool • Functional Management • Tactical Leadership© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 29. Event Management Basics • Adjust to crowd demographics • Anticipate crowd activities and behavior • Maintain the usability of means of egress • Make guests aware of their responsibilities • Observe crowd for potential problems© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 30. Event Management Basics • Monitor flow of crowd during duration of event • Recognize potential crowd crush • React/report potential crowd problems • Identify changing crowd behavior and demeanor© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 31. Event Management Basics Post event protocols • Danger Zone  Ensure adequate staffing and coverage both inside/outside the event  Ensure crowd completely disperses and maintain presence • Patrol other gathering spaces on campus • Coordinate with local police© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 32. Summary • Student Special Events are Potentially Lethal • Proper risk assessment & coordination can mitigate potential dangers and liability© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC
  • 33. Contact Information Margolis Healy & Associates www.margolishealy.com (866) 817-5817© Margolis Healy & Associates, LLC

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