Dental implant complications  too much sinus and too little bone-9.2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Dental implant complications too much sinus and too little bone-9.2

on

  • 383 views

Poor oral function and inferior self-esteem are just a couple of the many difficulties associated with tooth loss

Poor oral function and inferior self-esteem are just a couple of the many difficulties associated with tooth loss

Statistics

Views

Total Views
383
Views on SlideShare
383
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Dental implant complications  too much sinus and too little bone-9.2 Dental implant complications too much sinus and too little bone-9.2 Presentation Transcript

  • Dental Implant Complications:Too Much Sinus and Too LittleBone
  • Poor oral function and inferior self-esteem are just a couple of themany difficulties associated with tooth loss. Complete or partialdentures, often the solution to the problem of tooth loss, may notrestore oral function completely because of poor fit due to jaw bonedeterioration. Visit Infuse bone graft complications for more info.Bridges, often the solution to single tooth loss, have their drawbackstoo, because placing a bridge requires the teeth surrounding themissing tooth to be ground down and compromised.
  • To improve the aesthetics and function of toothreplacement, dental implants were developed and havegained popularity in recent years. Dental implants aretitanium "screws" which are placed in the jawbonereplacing the root of the lost tooth. Dental implants providean alternative to standard removable complete and partialdentures and bridges while improving chewing functionalmost completely.
  • The ProblemIn order to be a candidate for the dental implant placementprocedure, a patient must have sufficient bone height andwidth to support the titanium post or artificial tooth root.Unfortunately, if a patient has been without a tooth or teethfor a prolonged period of time, the bone that oncesupported the teeth becomes weakened and deteriorates,resulting in a lack of bone height to sustain a dentalimplant. This is especially true when tooth loss occurs inthe maxillary (upper) jaw bone. Because the maxilla restsagainst the sinus, when bone loss occurs, the sinusexpands to fill the space once occupied by jaw bone.
  • The SolutionTo solve this issue, sinus augmentation (lift) procedureshave been developed allowing bone in the upper jaw to beregenerated providing ample space to place a dentalimplant. The sinus lift procedure, invented in the mid 1970shas been refined and is now frequently successfullyperformed. Different versions of the sinus lift procedurehave evolved over time, each successful in different cases.
  • Successful, predictable dental implant placement in theposterior maxilla typically requires a minimum of 10mm ofvertical bone height. Moreover, bone density in theposterior maxilla is often poor, which could lead tocomplications during implant fixation. To address theseproblems, maxillary sinus elevation surgery was developedto increase the amount of bone available for implantplacement and has proven successful and become popular,allowing patients with insufficient bone to undergo dentalimplant surgery. The type of sinus augmentation that asurgeon chooses to use on a given patient depends on thesurgeons preference as well as patient anatomy.
  • Types of Sinus Augmentation (Lift) ProceduresThe Lateral Window Technique (LWT)Implant placement can be performed simultaneously withthe sinus elevation procedure or following a healing periodthat can last 6-9 months. Immediate placement during sinuselevation reduces overall healing time and eliminatesanother surgical procedure, which can be desirable topatients. The decision to place an implant during sinusaugmentation is dependent on the presence of adequatebone volume and quality to provide for initial stability of theimplant. Rosen and colleagues (1999) recommended atleast 5mm of native bone for immediate implant placementduring sinus augmentation.
  • Lateral Window Sinus Augmentation: The lateral approachinvolves a modified Caldwell-Luc operation to gain accessto the sinus cavity. A bony window is created in the lateralmaxillary wall, the Schneiderian membrane is elevated, andbone grafting material is a combination of autogenous boneand allograft. An absorbable collagen membrane is placedbetween the bone graft and the membrane as well as overthe bony window.
  • This technique is usually the preferred method of sinuselevation in situations of poor bone quality and minimalresidual bone height because it allows for directvisualization and accurate bone placement and volume atthe position of the implant. Also, tearing of the membranecan be easily treated, minimizing contamination of the graftduring healing.http://www.consumerinjuries.com/infuse-bone-grafts/
  • This technique is usually the preferred method of sinuselevation in situations of poor bone quality and minimalresidual bone height because it allows for directvisualization and accurate bone placement and volume atthe position of the implant. Also, tearing of the membranecan be easily treated, minimizing contamination of the graftduring healing.http://www.consumerinjuries.com/infuse-bone-grafts/