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Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life
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Women's Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart Healthy Life

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A presentation for women or men on how to live a heart-healthy life. By cardiologist Shawn Patrick, M.D., Portland, Oregon.

A presentation for women or men on how to live a heart-healthy life. By cardiologist Shawn Patrick, M.D., Portland, Oregon.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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  • And this is just a CT scan through a normal person with mostly organs and – organs with a little bit of scattered omental fat and Type 2 diabetes. You can see that their waist size might not be much different here, but in this person there’s a lot – sort of packed – the abdomen is packed with fat.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Heart Disease  Number one killer of women.  Kills 1 in 2 women (1 in 3 men).  Often undiagnosed and undertreated.  A very dangerous, but very preventable problem.  "Women are like teabags; you never know how strong they are until they're put in hot water." — Eleanor Roosevelt
    • 2. Top Ten List
    • 3. Women’s Heart Smarts: Top Ten List for a Heart-Healthy Life Shawn Patrick, MD April 29, 2011
    • 4. 10. Get a Good Night’s Sleep  Risk of high blood pressure increases when you sleep less than 7 hours per night.  The risk doubles when you get less than 5 hours per night.  If you have high blood pressure and sleep less than 7 hours per night, your risk for heart attack is increased.  REM sleep is responsible for reducing stress.  Muscle tissue repair increases during sleep.  Have good sleep habits.  If you have sleep apnea, TREAT IT!
    • 5. Sleep Apnea
    • 6. Sleep Apnea Associated with…  Coronary artery disease  Atrial fibrillation  Pulmonary hypertension  Hypoxic brain injury
    • 7. Sleep Apnea  An estimated 20 to 30 percent of Americans have some degree of sleep apnea.  If you have sleep apnea, wear your CPAP.  Weight loss is often curative.  Sleep apnea affects men and women.
    • 8. Sleep Apnea
    • 9. Get plenty of sleep
    • 10. 9. Know and Manage Your Blood Pressure  The risk for stroke is decreased 30% by lowering the systolic blood pressure from greater than 140 mmHg to 130 mmHg.  Only 30% of patients being treated for high blood pressure in the United States actually have control.  The ideal is less than 120/80.  Blood pressure higher than 130/80 should be treated.
    • 11. Prevalence of High Blood Pressure in Americans Age 20 and Older by Age and Sex NHANES IV: 1999- 2000 p18 Source: Health, United States, 2003, CDC/NCHS. Note: NA = data not available. Prevalence estimates for women ages 20-34 are considered unreliable.
    • 12. Hypertension  Prior to 1990 the incidence of hypertension was declining.  Data from 1999-2002 showed that the incidence had risen to 28.6% of the US population.  As of 2006, only one-third of Americans with hypertension had control of their blood pressure.
    • 13. Treating Hypertension  Weight loss  Medications  Diet changes  Exercise
    • 14. 8. Eat a Smart, Healthy Diet  Always eat breakfast, it can save you from a heart attack.  Avoid processed foods, especially foods with High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS).  When in season, shop at a farmer’s market at least twice per month or join a Community Sponsored Agriculture.  Avoid fast food.  Avoid saturated and trans-fats.
    • 15. Fast Food  Fast food is designed to be fast, not nutritious.  Fast food is often cooked in oil and the amount of sugar, salt, and fat is maximized to increase flavor.  Fast food is usually eaten by hand and is quickly consumed allowing customers to eat greater quantities (supersize) before they realize they are full.
    • 16. Processed Food  Many foods are now processed to contain corn products such as HFCS, which increase caloric load.  Processing often introduces chemicals designed to trigger parts of the brain to crave that particular food.  Many foods are predigested with enzymes or are tumbled to make them easier to eat.
    • 17. 7. Know and Manage Your Cholesterol  Weight loss  Medications  Diet changes  Exercise  Know your numbers > Total > Triglycerides <150 > HDL >40 men, >50 women > LDL <70 with DM CAD, <100 > Total/HDL <5.0
    • 18. Cholesterol  LDL particles cause atherosclerosis.  LDL concentration (gm/dl) is measured.  LDL particles may be large or small, so the concentration does not tell the number of particles present.  If LDL is mostly small particles, more particles are present, greater risk for atherosclerosis.
    • 19. 6. Make Three Little Choices Every Day  Conscious decisions to do something good for your health.  Simple choices: walking, taking the stairs, turning off the TV earlier, fruit for dessert, extra 30 minutes of exercise.  These little choices add up to have a huge impact.  They also confirm your dedication to good health.
    • 20. 5. Maintain a Healthy Weight
    • 21. Age-Adjusted Prevalence of Obesity in Americans Ages 20-74 by Sex and Survey NHES, NHANES I, NHANES II, NHANES III, NHANES IV: 1960-62, 1971-74, 1976-80, 1988-94 and 1999-2000 Note: Obesity is defined as a BMI of 30.0 or higher. p33 Source: CDC/NCHS.
    • 22. Prevalence of Overweight Among Students in Grades 9-12 by Sex and Race/Ethnicity United States: 2001 p33 Note: Overweight is defined as BMI 95th percentile or higher by age and sex of the CDC growth chart. Source: YRBS, MMWR, Vol. 51, No. SS-4, June 28, 2002, CDC/NCHS.
    • 23. Weight  For thousands of years, weight had been stable with no significant change.  In 1960, the average weight of the American woman aged 20-29 was 128 lbs.  By 2000, the average weight was 157 lbs.  As of 2007, 74.1% of Americans were overweight or obese.  WHY???
    • 24. WHY???  Fast food  Processed food  Lack of exercise
    • 25. 4. Quit Smoking
    • 26. Prevalence of High School Students Using any Tobacco Product Within the Last 30 Days by Race/Ethnicity and Sex United States: 2001 p27 Source: YRBS, MMWR, Vol. 51, No. SS-4, June 28, 2002, CDC/NCHS.
    • 27. A Smoking Problem  Approximately 25% of Americans smoke (27% men, 22.6% women).  1 in 2 chance of smoking-related death.  Average life years lost from smoking: 12  Cancers: lung, mouth, larynx, throat, oral, esophagus, urinary tract, kidney, pancreas, and cervix.  Most smokers die of heart disease first.
    • 28. Smoking  Quit  Use whatever means is necessary  Replace the activity  If not for you, for those around you
    • 29. 3. Avoid or Cure Diabetes
    • 30. Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 1990 No Data Less than 4% 4% to 6% Above 6%
    • 31. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 1991-92 Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83. No Data Less than 4% 4% to 6% Above 6%
    • 32. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 1993-94 Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83. No Data Less than 4% 4% to 6% Above 6%
    • 33. Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 1995-96 No Data Less than 4% 4% to 6% Above 6%
    • 34. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 1995 Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83. No Data Less than 4% 4% to 6% Above 6%
    • 35. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 1997-98 Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83. No Data Less than 4% 4% to 6% Above 6%
    • 36. Source: Mokdad et al., Diabetes Care 2001;24:412. Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 1999 No Data Less than 4% 4% to 6% Above 6%
    • 37. Source: Mokdad et al., J Am Med Assoc 2001;286(10). Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 2000 No Data Less than 4% 4% to 6% Above 6%
    • 38. Source: Mokdad et al., J Am Med Assoc 2001;286(10). Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes Trends Among Adults in the U.S., BRFSS 2002 No Data Less than 4% 4% to 6% Above 6%
    • 39. Diabetes Now and in the Future  2010 National Incidence: 14%  Projected Incidence 2050: 33%
    • 40. Normal Type 2 Diabetes Courtesy of Wilfred Y. Fujimoto, MD. Visceral Fat Distribution Normal vs Type 2 Diabetes
    • 41. Diabetes  Do you have diabetes?  Are you sure?
    • 42. Metabolic Syndrome: “Pre-Diabetes” 3 of These 5 Risk Factors Risk Factor Defining Level Abdominal obesity Men Women Waist Circumference >102 cm (>40 in) >88cm (>35 in) Triglycerides >150 mg/dl HDL-C Men Women <40 mg/dl <50 mg/dl Blood Pressure >130/>85 mmHg Fasting Glucose >110 mg/dl
    • 43. Diabetes  If you have metabolic syndrome, high probability of developing diabetes within 5 years.  Metabolic syndrome and diabetes have the same cardiovascular risk as established coronary artery disease.  Are you still sure?
    • 44. Treating (and Curing!) Diabetes  Weight loss  Medications  Diet changes  Exercise
    • 45. 2. Drink Plenty of Water  Americans far under-consume water.  Water is essential for every system in the body to function normally.  Consuming alcohol or sweetened soft drinks often defeats the purpose of drinking and adds empty calories.  Water helps us maintain normal body weight.  Rule of thumb: eight 8oz glasses per day, more with exercise, warm weather, altitude, or thirst.
    • 46. 1. Exercise  5 to 7 days per week.  Minimum of 30 minutes, more is better.  Exercise: Aerobic activity and strength.
    • 47. Leisure-time Physical Activity (PA) Patterns Among Overweight Adults by Race/Ethnicity and Sex BRFSS: 1998 p31 Source: MMWR, Vol. 49, No. 15, April 21, 2000, CDC/NCHS.
    • 48. Walking the dog
    • 49. Exercise  Lowers blood pressure.  Improves cholesterol, lowers LDL and raises HDL.  Can help treat/cure diabetes.  Can help weight control.  Improves endothelial function and reduces risk of heart attack and stroke.  Improves lean muscle mass and bone density.
    • 50. Design an Exercise Program  Pick activities you enjoy  Start slow, build as you go  Do it more days than you don’t  Sequester your exercise time  Get a partner, if you need one  Follow your progress  If it helps, think of exercise as medicine
    • 51. Check Your Progress  Compare objective data > Weight, BP, cholesterol, glucose control > Speed, strength, endurance  Compare subjective data > How do you feel?
    • 52. Conclusion  10. Get plenty of sleep.  9. Know and manage your blood pressure.  8. Eat a smart, healthy diet.  7. Know and manage your cholesterol.  6. Make 3 little choices every day.
    • 53. Conclusion  5. Maintain a healthy weight.  4. Quit smoking.  3. Avoid or cure diabetes.  2. Drink plenty of water.  1. Exercise
    • 54. "I am what I am today because of the choices I made yesterday" — Eleanor Roosevelt
    • 55. For more tips and information  www.theactiveheart.blogspot.com  Coming in May 2011 www.theactiveheart.com

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