The Multicultural\'s In Action Sports Report

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The M.A.S. Report is an interactive presentation that dives into the world ethnic action sports engagement. This report takes a specific look at Hispanic snowboarding.

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The Multicultural\'s In Action Sports Report

  1. 1. COVER› A “ B l Ac K & B r oW n PA P e r ” s e r i e s The Multicultural’s in Written BY: Kevin BAnG in PArtnersHiP WitH: HueMAnitAs® Action Sports Report GAil BrooKs GeoscAPe® JuAn AlBerto DelArocA equiPo rocA MArcus JiMÉnez MentAlounGe MeDiA
  2. 2. DISCLAIMER This report has been prepared by: Huemanitas 6515 E. Union Avenue, Suite 348, Denver Colorado, 80237 Inside Front Telephone: 303-927-6198 Online: www.huemanitas.com Email: info@huemanitas.com COVER Raul Pinto In partnership with: Owner Sa+ellite Board Shop The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of any person or organization cited in this report. Huemanitas does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. The boundaries, colors, denominations, and other information shown on any charts and/or tables in this work do not imply any judgment on the part of Huemanitas concerning the accuracy of any reported data.“There’s definiTely an opporTuniTy To bring oThers inTo The snowboardcommuniTy. if everyone can geT on The snow aT leasT once, some willevenTually end up aT our shop because of The lifesTyle or shop culTure.” – raul pinTo, saTelliTe shop owner 3
  3. 3. TAbLE of ConTEnTS About This Report 6 Methodology 7 Terminology 8 Executive Overview 10 Introduction: Looking Towards The Future 15 The Big Picture 16Image TBD Going Deeper: The Need For Greater Intelligence Socioeconomics 25 26 Geography 28 Lifestyle 30 Population 32 Acculturation 34 Language 36 Consumer Engagement 39 Sidebar: The Altruistic Affect 45 Contributing Authors 48 The Partners 49 References 50 5
  4. 4. AbouT ThIS REpoRT METhoDoLogy This report looks at both the quantitative and qualitative sides of where Action INQUIRIES: Cultural IntelllIgenCe a QuantItatIve & Sports will gain its next wave of growth; the urban multicultural marketplace. This In Cultural Marketing and Cultural Intelligence, a QualItatIve OvervIew report and all its supportive materials are the work of the collective partnership For more information on this Report and what between Equipo Roca, Geoscape®, Mentalounge, and Huemanitas®. This Hispanic we can do to help you bridge the cultural gaps in large portion of the analysis is done by reviewing and For this report, our research was designed to help your business, please contact Marcus Jiménez analyzing a variety of information, from focus groups companies understand from a topline perspective, Snow Summary was written by Kevin Bang, Juan Alberto Delaroca, Gail Brooks (who at Huemanitas: 303-927-6198 or via email at: also compiled the framework and topline) and Marcus Jiménez (who also served as and interviews to documentary materials and media. both quantitatively and qualitatively, the social marcus@huemanitas.com. the reports Supervising Editor). The report was copy-edited by Angelica De Guzman. and economic viability of the Hispanic snow sports The goal being to uncover, how social reality is market. To compliment the preliminary quantitative To access additional support content including video interviews with some of the produced, maintained, challenged, negotiated, and data, Huemanitas also conducted qualitative individuals cited in this report, please visit: http://www.MASreport.com. transformed in the market. This helps us to answer interviews with both Hispanic snowboard how is this reality communicated and represented. consumers, and snow sport industry experts How do members of this community culturally in order to gain a deeper level of insight and identify themselves? For brands, we need to perspective, The individuals interviewed include: abOut the Data uncover what are the cultural triggers that prompt engagement with communication around assets of The data compiled for this report was primarily provided by Geoscape® with this community? These dynamics create symbols supplemental industry data from Snow Sports Industries America, and consumer or icons that equate to a brand’s value as well as segment data sourced from the Pew Hispanic Center, and U.S. Census. All citations the cultural significance that is linked to it through and sources have been marked accordingly and provided in the reports references advertising and marketing. section. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of any persons or organizations cited in this report. Huemanitas does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. The boundaries, colors, denominations, and other information Interviews shown on any charts and/or tables in this work do not imply any judgment on the • Bob Holme, Youth Marketing Director, Winter Park Ski Resort part of Huemanitas concerning the accuracy of any reported data. • Larry Nuñez, Social Media Manager for VANS Snow • Raul Pinto, Owner of Satellite Boardshop, Boulder CO • Cristian Rubí, Consumer / Hispanic Snowboarding Outreach Program, Denver CO • Gaby Hernandez, Consumer / Latina AASI Intructor & SOS Outreach Graduate • Pamela Flor, Consumer / Paraguayan National, Winter Park Resort Employee6 7
  5. 5. TERMInoLogy The terms “Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report. “Cultural Space” refers to the place or channel where culture is in action. The term “youths” refers to 14- to 18-year olds unless otherwise indicated. For this report, the terms “Hispanic “Cultural Marker” refers to a symbol or totem that identifies the consumer or brand as a part of the culture. Brands youths”, “Latino youths,” “young Latinos” and “young adults” are all used interchangeably. must be authentically “representative” of the culture to gain access to a cultural space or to successfully engage members of the network in that space. All references to whites, blacks, Asians and others refer to the non-Hispanic components of their respective population. “Cultural Code” refers to the culturally specific meanings assigned by cultural networks to products, services and brands. “Foreign born” refers to persons born outside of the United States to parents neither of whom was a U.S. citizen. Foreign born also refers to those born in Puerto Rico. Although individuals born in Puerto Rico are U.S. citizens by birth, they are included among the foreign born because they are born into a Spanish- dominant culture and because “Cultural Frame” refers to the situationally driven consumer frame of mind. on many points their attitudes, views and beliefs are much closer to Hispanics born abroad than to Latinos born in the 50 states or the District of Columbia, even those who identify themselves as being of Puerto Rican origin. “Frameswtiching” refers to the conscious and unconscious “switching” of a consumers frame of mind according to situational context. “Native born” or “U.S. born” refers to persons born in the United States and those born abroad to parents at least one of whom was a U.S. citizen. Unless otherwise noted, this report uses the following definitions of the first, second, third and higher generations: First generation: Same as foreign born above. The terms “foreign born,” “first generation” and “immigrant” are used interchangeably in this report. Second generation: Born in the United States, with at least one first-generation parent. Third and higher generation: Born in the United States, with both parents born in the United States. This report uses the term “third generation” as shorthand for “third and higher generation.” Language dominance is a composite measure based on self-described assessments of speaking and reading abilities. Spanish-dominant persons are more proficient in Spanish than in English, i.e., they speak and read Spanish “very well” or “pretty well” but rate their English speaking and reading ability lower. Bilingual refers to persons who are proficient in both English and Spanish. English-dominant persons are more proficient in English than in Spanish. “Cultural Networks” refers to where people are connected by membership in a particular cultural sphere. This membership is intrinsic to how consumers self identify. Source: Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America (2009). Washington D.C: Pew Hispanic Center Source: Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America (2009). Washington D.C: Pew Hispanic Center8 9
  6. 6. ExECuTIvE ovERvIEw baCkgrOunD tO PrOvIDe greater COntext, However, even with statistics as profound as these, the industry posits that if multicultural consumers here are a Few FaCts: multicultural snow sport participation stands at only have no money and no way of getting to the resort, Snowboarding began as a counter-culture in the U.S. and quickly rose from the 3.4%.6 Even isolated from the pending results of the then how are they going to participate? experiment of a few, to a $4 billion dollar industry. Retail sales for the sport now 24% upcoming 2010 Census, these statistics already point outpace that of its elder sibling, skiing, and is considered a key contributor to the African American towards an inevitable “tipping point” on the horizon. Industry outreach efforts have primarily focused revival of the snow sports industry overall. Clearly, the next wave of growth for the snow on exposing urban and multicultural youth to 27% sports category squarely hinges on demonstrating snowboarding through non-profit and more Ironically, the sport has now come full circle. From humble, obscure beginnings Hispanic and growing the value and appeal of the sport to altruistic platforms. Non-profit programs such as where few knew or participated in the sport, to generating mass appeal, to now multicultural millennials. SOS Outreach and the Hoods-to-Woods Foundation Multicultural millennials (ages 14-29) represent facing perhaps it’s most critical challenge to date, the growth of the sport amidst a approximately one-fourth of their respective total have emerged to bridge the divide between urban, plateauing of rider participation since 2004. markets (24% for African Americans, 27% for Yet challenges do exist. Unfortunately, over the past multicultural youth and the outdoors. Incredibly Hispanic Americans).1 several years, the industry has fallen suspect to a effective, these programs demonstrate how the sport series of misconceptions that have limited its ability does indeed resonate with multicultural youth, and lOOkIng tOwarDs the Future to effectively engage with multicultural audiences. just how powerful the use of an influencer model The M.A.S. Report takes a closer aim at answering the question of whether the 32% These include misconceptions surrounding within urban ethnic community can be. multicultural market presents a viable and sustainable opportunity for growth to the Combined socioeconomics, geographic proximity to ski resorts, industry. This “Hispanic Snow Summary” focuses on the Hispanic American snow and consumer disinterest in the sport overall. Through these non-profit outreach efforts, we see a sports market as a precursor to broader multicultural market engagement. Through glimpse of how interest in the sport does exist and customized demographic and preliminary ethnographic analysis, this summary aims The African American & Hispanic American how multicultural youth share a positive attitude to illustrate the untapped potential of this consumer segment. Ultimately, it provides millennial segments combined make up real OPPOrtunIty vs. towards the sport overall. However, for the industry industry insiders with a foundational understanding of how this consumer segment approximately one-third (32%) of the total U.S. PerCeIveD Challenges to produce significant growth into the future, it must millennial segment.2 will impact the action sports category now, and into the foreseeable future. engage the broader multicultural market in a more From a socioeconomic perspective, the sustainable and meaningful way that shifts from 21.46 misconception is rooted in the belief that most altruism to active engagement. the bIg PICture Million African Americans and Hispanic Americans can’t Totaled afford to go snowboarding, as they generally share Across America, multicultural millennials are reshaping the world around us, lower household (HH) incomes than their general creating a “New American Mainstream”. In particular, African American and Hispanic market counterparts. This is compounded with a American millennials make up the fastest growing segments in the country today. belief that as these segments are concentrated in When combined, the total multicultural millennial large metropolitan cities only, it places them well market equals 21.46 million Americans.3 This size outside the proximity of most ski resorts. Simply put, in population would rank as the second largest city in the world, placing it ahead of Los Angeles, New York, Mexico City, and Sao Paulo.410 11
  7. 7. ExECuTIvE ovERvIEw (COntInueD) ) the neeD FOr greater IntellIgenCe sOCIOeCOnOmICs POPulatIOn In the data compiled across the seven DMA’s Today, native born births -- not immigration -- are the The M.A.S. Report sets out to better define for marketers the true potential size of highlighted in this summary, approximately 62% of main drivers of Hispanic growth in the country.9 the U.S. Hispanic market. To do so, the focus must shift to provide the industry with these Hispanic American households have incomes of Hispanic Millennial teens in particular, represent a deeper and more actionable level of understanding. This means going beyond $50,000 or more. All totaled, this represents a base one fifth of the overall teen market and are growing what is commonly known in an effort to uncover and more closely define which level of over 2 million Hispanic American household’s. about six times faster than other segments.10 key aspects of Hispanic American consumer demography and behavior, need to be The total number of affluent Hispanic American considered in planning for consumer engagement. household’s across the seven DMA’s reviewed is aCCulturatIOn equal to just over 18%. Put another way, roughly Acculturation rates across the seven key Hispanic In an era where data is abundant, it becomes critical for marketers to be able to one out of every five potential Hispanic American DMA’s found that 40% of all Hispanic Americans uncover and interpret implication from key actionable insights. This forms the basis snow sports consumers may very well reside in an consider themselves bicultural, meaning they identify from which this report has been compiled, synthesized, and presented. affluent household with income reaching at least with both American and Hispanic cultures equally. 100k annually. This number represents a staggering 5.1 million This Hispanic Snow Summary aims to also correct the misconceptions cited earlier consumers in just seven total markets. that have long lingered in the industry. In our analysis of the top seven Hispanic DMA’s (Designated Market Areas), we found that Hispanic Americans not only meet geOgraPhy the same standards by which target general market consumers are determined, but The Hispanic American population is not a single, language monolithic culture as the segments composition Of the 13.3 million Hispanic Americans found in our may in fact present the industry with an additional segment of opportunity, affluent is continually shifting by nationality along with targeted DMA’s, over 7.7 million, or 58% of the total Hispanic American millennials. geographical center. Specifically, this report has segments combined, are either English Dependent or identified the following DMA’s as representative Bilingual English (preferred). Looking at socioeconomics via household income levels compiled through primary of providing the greatest opportunity for Hispanic and secondary sources, geographic density and proximity to mountain resorts, American consumer engagement. They are: and filtering these analytics through a proprietary acculturation model developed Chicago, IL, Denver, CO, Los Angeles, CA, New York, exclusively by Geoscape®, The M.A.S. Report provides marketers with a realistic NY, Sacramento, CA, and San Francisco, CA, and starting point for multicultural planning and engagement. The following are just a Washington D.C. few highlights of what the full report explores in greater depth.12 13
  8. 8. Gaby Hernandez Latina AASI Instructor InTRoDuCTIon SOS Outreach Graduate InTRoDuCTIon lOOkIng tOwarDs the Future Snowboarding began as a counter-culture in the U.S. and quickly rose from the experiment of a few, to a $4 billion dollar industry. Retail sales for the sport now outpace that of its elder sibling, skiing, and is considered a key contributor to the revival of the snow sports industry overall. Ironically, the sport of snowboarding has now come full circle. From humble, obscure beginnings where few knew or participated in the sport, to generating mass appeal, to now facing perhaps it’s most critical challenge to date, the growth of the sport amidst a plateauing of rider participation since 2004. The M.A.S. Report takes a closer look at this challenge and aims to answer the question of whether the multicultural market presents a viable and sustainable opportunity for growth to the industry. This “Hispanic Snow Summary” focuses on the Hispanic American snow sports market as a precursor to broader multicultural market engagement. Through customized demographic and preliminary ethnographic analysis, this summary aims to illustrate the untapped potential of this consumer segment. Ultimately, the M.A.S. Report provides industry insiders with a foundational understanding of how this consumer segment will impact the action sports category now, and into the foreseeable future.“now more people are geTTing involved and people i knew(hispanics) ThaT didn’T wanT To know anyThing abouTsnowboarding are calling me and asking if i can Teach Them...” –gaby hernandez, laTina aasi insTrucTor 15
  9. 9. ThE bIg pICTuRE The snow sports industry now finds itself revisiting its earlier days, a period of time tO PrOvIDe greater COntext, levels. Walk by any inner city tennis court, basketball As leaders and influencers in music and skate culture where few knew of snowboarding, had limited access to participate in it, yet were here are a Few FaCts: court or golf course, and one witnesses first-hand the respectively, each have helped usher in an entire eager to embrace it and make it a way of life. Snowboarding is in a decisive position incredible impact of multiculturalism at play. It is a living generation of multicultural skateboarders. Some to recapture the creativity and nostalgia of those early years, by reaching out to a 24% testament to how they and others before them, have argue that Pharrell Williams’ showcase of a cultural African new generation of riders – multicultural millennials. been able to diversify and grow their sports to become mash up between Hip Hop and skateboard lifestyles American more inclusive of ethnic youth around the world. in his 2003 video for “Frontin” featuring Jay-Z (see Across America, multicultural millennials are reshaping the world around us, 27% sidebar for video link), helped to launch the era of creating a “New American Mainstream”. In particular, African American and Hispanic Hispanic Glimpses of this same phenomenon can also be “Skurban” and making what was then seen as a American millennials make up the fastest growing segments in the country today. To Multicultural millennials (ages 14-29) represent seen in the world of action sports. Hip Hop producer White only sport, cool for ethnic kids to also embrace. provide greater context, here are a few facts: approximately one-fourth of their respective total Pharrell “Skateboard P” Williams and skateboarding In the video, audiences witnessed one of the hottest markets (24% for African Americans, 27% for superstar Paul “P-Rod” Rodriguez Jr., are just a few up-and-coming artists of the genre, rap alongside the Hispanic Americans).1 However, with statistics as profound as these, multicultural snow sport participation examples of how urban ethnic culture and sport have Hip Hop juggernaut Jay-Z, flanked by skateboarders stands at only 3.4%.6 Even isolated from the pending results of the upcoming collided to deliver a unique lifestyle blend of cultural of all shades and ethnicities, riding an indoor half 2010 Census, these statistics already point towards an inevitable “tipping point” pride and urban street credibility. pipe as the main backdrop. on the horizon. Clearly, the next wave of growth for the snow sports category 32% squarely hinges on demonstrating and growing the value and appeal of the sport to Combined multicultural millennials. The African American & Hispanic American “Frontin” featuring Jay-Z the InFluenCe OF Culture On sPOrts millennial segments combined make up approximately one-third (32%) of the total U.S. For over a century, multiculturals have played a pivotal role in reshaping the elite millennial segment.2 strata of American sports. From Satchel Paige to Jesse Owens, Roberto Clemente to Hideo Nomo, ethnic players have helped to not only breakthrough cultural barriers, 21.46 but also stretch the boundaries of those same sports to include audiences of color Million across the country and the world. Totaled Fast forward to the present day, multicultural athletes continue to expand the boundaries between culture and sport. The impact and influence left by Serena and Venus Williams, Manu Ginóbili, and Tiger Woods has been monumental, with each When combined, the total multicultural millennial having expanded the appeal of their respective sports and cultures to unprecedented market equals 21.46 million Americans.3 This size in population would rank as the second largest city in the world, placing it ahead of Los Angeles, New York, Mexico City, and Sao Paulo.416 17
  10. 10. ThE bIg pICTuRE (COntInueD) This proud, authentic and seamless display of both skate and Hip Hop lifestyle helped bring into the fold those ethnic skate: the gateway tO snOw “skater’s in seclusion”. A major influencer in popular culture, Williams’ actions may have ultimately catapulted the sport and culture of skateboarding into the broader multicultural spectrum, making it approachable and even Like P-Rod, Montoya is the first and only Mexican-American professional snowboarder on the circuit today. acceptable for ethnic participation. By placing the culture front and center for the world to recognize as part of his Picking up snowboarding as a winter pastime for skateboarding, Montoya ultimately reached the sports pinnacle identity, Williams essentially brought together the worlds of urban, ethnic, and skateboard cultures, forming a truly in 2005, when he was ranked third on Snowboard Magazine’s Top 10 Riders of the Year. For him, skateboarding multicultural experience. served as the gateway towards a life and career as a professional snowboarder. In looking at the case of P-Rod, he may very well represent the next evolution of the multicultural action sports Across America today, as skateparks continue to sprout up in and around urban epicenters, a whole new wave of athlete. The son of a famous Hispanic American actor, Paul Rodriguez, P-Rod has taken the industry by storm multicultural rider pool is growing, made up of young boys and girls of all shades and backgrounds. Just like their since the age of 11. He is the recipient of back to back gold medal wins in the 2004 and 2005 Summer X Games, general market counterparts, they also desire to be inspired by athletes that they can relate to. This implies that and is arguably one of the best street style skaters on the pro circuit today. His incredible run is helping prove to the continued cultivation of cultural personalities and influencers like Montoya and P-Rod will be critical to growing the industry that bicultural Hispanics are not only interested in the sport, but that they can also lead it. multicultural participation in the action sports arena. If the industry is going to expand the sport to its fullest potential, it must seek to increase its participation to include this untapped well of potential consumers. His rise from the shadow of his Hollywood father to superstar skater is a story that people from all backgrounds, especially Hispanics, can relate and aspire to. Sponsors are also taking notice as he is the first Mexican- However, challenges do exist. Unfortunately, over the past several years, the industry has fallen suspect to a American athlete to be sponsored by Nike who in August 2010, launched the Zoom Paul Rodriguez 4 sneaker series of misconceptions that have limited its ability to effectively engage with multicultural audiences. These globally. This launch clearly demonstrates how much Nike believes in the marketing potential of this incredible include misconceptions surrounding socioeconomics, geographic proximity to ski resorts, and consumer talent. Yet the question remains, who and where will multiculturals look to in the sport of snowboarding? disinterest in the sport overall. Fortunately, over the past decade, a new crop of multicultural snowboarders have steadily made their way into the elite ranks of the sport. Today, they include Japanese sensation, Ryoh Aono, and the revered Mexican- Lat34.com - American, Marc Frank Montoya. Marc Frank Montya Interview NikeSB - Paul Rodriguez 4.018 19
  11. 11. ThE bIg pICTuRE (COntInueD) real OPPOrtunIty vs. PerCeIveD Challenges “Now more people are “The best thing about it is to be walking in the ‘hood with a snowboard and get From a socioeconomic perspective, the misconception is rooted in the belief that getting involved and people I stopped by a bunch of little kids and spend time talking to them. That really makes most African Americans and Hispanic Americans can’t afford to go snowboarding, knew (Hispanics) that didn’t me feel good, that I can spark interest in some young black kid’s mind.” as they generally share lower household (HH) incomes than their general market counterparts. This is compounded with a belief that as these segments are want to know anything about concentrated in large metropolitan cities only, it places them well outside the snowboarding are calling me Meanwhile, in Brooklyn, New York, Brian “Deka” Other outreach efforts such as the creation of Ruby proximity of most ski resorts. Simply put, the industry posits that if multicultural Paupaw began the Hoods-to-Woods Foundation, Hill Rail Yard, Denver’s first sanctioned urban snow consumers have no money and no way of getting to the resort, then how are they and asking if I can teach them a non-profit program that provides inner-city terrain park, acknowledged the appeal and growth going to participate? or get them involved in SOS.” youth with awareness and access to life-changing of snow sports to make it accessible to a broader, experiences found in the outdoors. Snowboarding is more urban and multicultural audience. Results from So industry outreach efforts have primarily focused on exposing urban youth to a core offering of the organization, as the program is visitor surveys indicate the park is making progress snowboarding through non-profit and more altruistic platforms. Non-profit programs designed to build confidence and facilitate individual on attracting multicultural youth. Forty percent of such as SOS Outreach and the Hoods-to-Woods Foundation have emerged to bridge discovery among youth participants. Paupaw uses Ruby Hill participants were non-white, and 39% of all the divide between urban youth and the outdoors. Incredibly effective, these programs his own personal involvement in snowboarding as a participants were beginners. demonstrate how the sport does indeed resonate with multicultural youth, and just how catalyst to reach other young urban teens. powerful the use of an influencer model within the ethnic community can be. Through non-profit outreach efforts such as the ones Paupaw realized that snowboarding was a means of highlighted here, we see a glimpse of how interest in Research participant, Gaby Hernandez, is a testament to this model approach and making a difference by simply exposing urban youth the sport does exist and how multicultural youth share the work being accomplished by SOS Outreach, a non-profit program based in to the idea through accessibility. a positive attitude towards the sport overall. However, Avon, Colorado. The program is designed to build self-esteem in youth through for the industry to prowwduce significant growth into outdoor activities. Hernandez moved to Edwards, Colorado from Mexico City at the future, it must engage the broader multicultural age 12. She didn’t speak English, but that didn’t deter her from becoming a certified market in a more sustainable and meaningful way that AASI (American Association of Snowboard Instructors) snowboard instructor six shifts from altruism to active engagement. years later. In 2006, Hernandez was named an Outdoor Idol Award recipient by the Outdoor Industry Association, and credits snowboarding for inspiring the core values that led to her success. “People might say things like, ‘What’s wrong with you? That’s a white boy thing’ but I don’t let it stop me, because I used to think the same way so I understand.”20 21
  12. 12. ThE bIg pICTuRE (COntInueD) PuttIng It all tOgether Table 1: Hispanicity In order to gain greater insight and intelligence. we must begin by assessing GEOSCAPE® HISPANICITY TM the landscape where the fault-lines of culture appear. These areas include: Geoscape® HispanicityTM Acculturation Segmentation socioeconomics, geography, and acculturation. Understanding the nuances across these fault-lines enables us to answer with greater certainty, questions such as: How big is this multicultural snow sports market? How big of an opportunity does it truly Code Group Title Descriptors represent? What areas or cities present the greatest Return-On-Investment (ROI) HA1 Americanizado English Dominant (nearly no Spanish) potential? What role does acculturation level play? How does it impact strategy? Born in US; 3rd+ generation Few Hispanic cultural practices In the sections to follow, The M.A.S. Report sets out to answer these preliminary HA2 Nueva Latina English Preferred (some Spanish) questions, with an emphasis on better defining for marketers the true potential size Born in U.S. 2nd generation of the U.S. Hispanic snow sports market. Looking at socioeconomics via household Some Hispanic cultural practices; often “retro-acculturate” income levels compiled through primary and secondary sources, geographic density and proximity to mountain resorts, and filtering these analytics through a HA3 Bi-Cultural Bi-Lingual (equal or nearly) proprietary acculturation model developed exclusively by Geoscape (see Table 1: ® Immigrat as child or young adult Geoscape HispanicityTM), this summary provides marketers with a realistic starting ® Many Hispanic cultural practices point for multicultural planning and engagement. However, this summary is only the HA4 Hispano Spanish Preferred (some English) beginning of what is ultimately a much larger story that requires further exploration Immigrant as adult, in U.S. 10+ years and investigation through formalized research and more in-depth cultural Pre-dominant Hispanic cultural practices intelligence planning. HA5 Latino Americana Spanish Dominant (nearly no English) Recent Immigrant as adult (less than 10 years ago) Primarily Hispanic cultural practices Identify with home country more so than U.S. Hispanic Source: Geoscape, American Marketscape DataStream: 2010 Series22 23
  13. 13. goIng DEEpER Bob Holme Youth Marketing Director Winter Park Ski Resort the neeD FOr greater IntellIgenCe To more accurately assess the opportunity presented in this summary, the focus must shift to provide the industry with a deeper and more actionable level of understanding. This means going beyond what is commonly known in an effort to uncover and more closely define which key aspects of Hispanic American consumer demography and behavior, need to be considered in planning for consumer engagement. This summary focuses asking fundamental questions to commonly held assumptions of the market within three key areas: socioeconomics, geography and lifestyle. These areas set the base framework for greater consumer and cultural understanding. This is overlaid with a second layer of intelligence covering population, acculturation, and language that is aimed at providing the industry with a more holistic vantage point of the target market. In a world where data is abundant, it is critical for marketers to be able to uncover key actionable insights that can clearly transition to implication. This forms the basis from which this report has been compiled, synthesized, and presented.w“The urban (mulTiculTural) markeT is a huge unTapped resource forresorTs. There is a loT of opporTuniTy To reach inTo ThaT markeT and giveaccess To geT on The mounTain and have a ski or ride experience.” – bob holme, youTh markeTing direcTor 25
  14. 14. SoCIoEConoMICS whICh segments rePresent Table 2: Household Income the greatest POtentIal? HOUSEHOLD INCOME From a national perspective, between 2000 and 2006, Hispanic American purchasing power climbed more than 63% to $798 billion.6 By 2011, it is estimated to HH Income Distribution by Top Hispanic “Snow” DMA, 2010 top $1.2 trillion.7 While the Hispanic median household income is lower than the U.S. DMA $35 – 50K $50 – 75K $75 – 100K $100 – 150K average of $50,000, sources affirm that more Hispanics are rapidly moving into the middle class (as defined by a household income of at least $40,000). In fact, in the Chicago 91,442 114,591 67,669 50,577 data compiled across the seven DMA’s highlighted in this summary, approximately Denver 43,168 45,631 24,960 18,539 62% of these Hispanic American households have incomes of $50,000 or more (see Los Angeles 302,463 380,063 231,219 217,342 Table 2: Household Income). All totaled, this represents a base level of over 2 million Hispanic American household’s New York 194,851 238,462 141,394 125,520 Sacramento-Stockton-Modesto 45,308 55,365 32,330 29,128 Moreover, Hispanics are an increasing proportion of the total affluent market San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose 69,745 85,020 49,623 44,666 (defined as adults with household incomes of $100,000 or more). In this case, the Washington, DC (Hagerstown) 34,252 45,979 30,800 29,854 total number of affluent Hispanic American household’s across the seven DMA’s reviewed is equal to just over 18%. Put another way, roughly one out of every five TOTAL 781,229 965,111 577,995 515,626 potential Hispanic American snow sports consumers may very well reside in an affluent household. Source: Geoscape American Marketscape Data Stream 2010 Series This preliminary analysis helps to also correct the misconception that has long lingered in the industry that Hispanics cannot afford to participate in the sport. In our analysis of the seven top Hispanic DMA’s, we found that Hispanic Americans not only meet the same standards by which determine targeted general market consumers, but may in fact present the industry with an additional segment of opportunity, affluent Hispanic American millennial.26 27
  15. 15. gEogRAphy where OPPOrtunIty exIsts To better assess whether proximity is truly a major combinations in ultimately targeting and engaging barrier to growing multicultural participation, we with multicultural audiences. It also provides The Hispanic American population is not a single, monolithic culture as the segments have compiled Table 4: Proximity to Resorts. It marketers with a preliminary roadmap for strategic composition is continually shifting by nationality along with geographical center. This implies lists all mountain resorts within 100 miles or less of development with regards to planning media, that the industry must remain conscious of the diversity of the Hispanic American market focus Hispanic DMA’s. From here, we can begin to promotions, events, sampling, and sponsorships. nationally, regionally and in many cases, even locally. interpret which DMA’s and resorts present the best Furthermore, from a geographic perspective, this also implies that we need to more narrowly define which DMA’s (Designated Market Areas) represent the greatest opportunity for Hispanic Table 4: Proximity American consumer engagement. They are: Chicago, IL, Denver, CO, Los Angeles, CA, New PROXIMITY TO RESORTS York, NY, Sacramento, CA, and San Francisco, CA, and Washington D.C. Table 2: below helps Ski Resort Proximity Within 80 miles by DMA, 2010 illustrate how these Hispanic DMA’s differentiate by nationality. MIles from DMA Ski Resort City Center Table 3: Nationality Chicago Raging Bu alo Snowboard Park 39 NATIONALITY Denver Eldora Mountain 30 Hispanic Nationality by Percentage Across Top Hispanic “Snow” DMAs, 2010 Winter Park / Mary Jane 41 Loveland 57 Central South Arapahoe Basin 48 DMA Mexican Caribbean American American Other Keystone 53 Breckenridge 58 Nationally 65% 14% 8% 6% 7% Copper Mountain 63 Vail 71 Chicago 79% 11% 3% 4% 4% Ski Cooper 75 Denver 77% 2% 3% 2% 16% Beaver Creek 100 Los Angeles 79% 2% 13% 3% 4% New York 12% 53% 10% 19% 5% Los Angeles Mountain High 43 Sacramento-Stockton-Modesto 80% 3% 5% 2% 9% Snow Summit 78 San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose 67% 4% 17% 5% 7% Big Bear Mountain 79 Washington, DC (Hagerstown) 16% 11% 45% 19% 9% New York Mount Peter 35 Total DMA Population Counts 7,798,601 2,568,655 1,680,012 1,164,673 728,827 Hidden Valley (New Jersey) 38 Mountain Creek (New Jersey) 38 Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2006-2008 American Community Survey Shawnee Mountain (Pennsylvania) 61 Ski Big Bear (Pennsylvania) 74 Data are based on a sample and are subject to sampling variability. The degree of uncertainty for an estimate Camelback (Pennsylvania) 75 arising from sampling variability is represented through the use of a margin of error. The value shown here is the 90 percent margin of error. The margin of error can be interpreted roughly as providing a 90 percent probability that the interval defined by the estimate minus the margin of error and the estimate plus the Washington, DC (Hagerstown) Ski Liberty (Pennsylvania) 62 margin of error (the lower and upper confidence bounds) contains the true value. In addition to sampling Whitetail (Pennsylvania) 75 variability, the ACS estimates are subject to nonsampling error (for a discussion of nonsampling variability, see Accuracy of the Data). The e ect of nonsampling error is not represented in these tables. Source: Geoscape American Marketscape Data Stream 2010 Series28 29
  16. 16. LIfESTyLE the urban InFluenCe On In a behind-the-scenes video piece directed and of the Kansas City Chiefs, Rocawear used the art COnsumer behavIOr. produced by Benedict Hadley for a Rocawear of juxtaposition to tell a story of achievement and Clothing fashion shoot titled “From Marcy to affluence in targeting urban and multicultural Snowboarding has been around for more than 25 years and today, the industry has Mountain Top”, we see how the symbols of status consumers. They clearly understood the value that taken a revisionist approach towards communicating its lifestyle to current and can be carefully intertwined to effectively position Aspen would represent as cultural currency to these future snowboard enthusiasts. Film and viral video highlight the sports’ outsider a brand targeting the multicultural and urban audiences. In describing the concept behind the beginnings and skateboard heritage as a means of articulating the sports culture markets. An advertising campaign shot in Aspen, campaign, Jay-Z highlights this very approach. In and lifestyle. This effective method of marketing can be used towards efforts to Colorado featuring Jay-Z, fashion supermodels summarizing the focus of the brand and the role that integrate the Hispanic snowboard experience, as professional Hispanic riders and Naomi Campbell, Jamie King, and Larry Johnson culture plays in building a brand, Jay-Z stated: skaters like Montoya and P-Rod are in a prime position to inspire a new following of multicultural action sports enthusiasts. “...It’s about bringing that (cultural) divide together. You’ve got mash ups Montoya’s own life story in particular, is one of “rags to riches” – a theme common and inspiring among multicultural youth and hip-hop culture. Growing up on the happening like myself and Linkin Park...The cultures are so closely intertwined streets of Denver’s Northside, Montoya attributes skate and snowboarding as now...So it’s just about bringing those cultures together...We used to be a the keys to a better life for him and his family, bringing with him an authentic, refreshing, urban identity to a sport that is traditionally ruled by white suburbanites. neighborhood cultural brand, now we have to be a global cultural brand while Today, he remains an iconic symbol in the sport of snowboarding maintaining our (brand) integrity.” as a pioneer for his innovative and unmistakable urban style. As the boundaries between sport and culture continue to blur, urban symbols of “...(It’s as if) guys from the status are continually expressed and leveraged in a variety of ways and mediums. From music to video to fashion and even marketing, the Hip Hop genre has long hood, got to rent a house used these mediums in often innovative and incredibly effective ways to evoke the somewhere opulent, in an deeper aspirations of consumers, ultimately influencing their behavior. affluent neighborhood, and From Marcy To Mountain Top brought their friends out like Naomi and Jamie for a fun weekend.”30 31
  17. 17. popuLATIon the hIsPanIC amerICan POPulatIOn “It’s like putting your identitiy on shuffle. It’s the freedom, the power and the Now approximately 50 million strong, Hispanics are the fastest growing population confidence to mix and match identities, and to have more than one at any in the U.S., and by 2015, are projected to represent 19% of the entire U.S. population. given moment. They (Hispanic millennials) don’t want to be pigeon-holed or This number is estimated to grow to 30% of the total U.S. population and will account for 438 million Americans by the year 2050.8 spoken to as someone apart, or individual, they are very sensitive to that.” Today, native born births -- not immigration -- are the main drivers of Hispanic growth in the country.9 This implies that marketers across all categories will need to In the case of retroaculturation, we are witnessing Intraculturation is a recent trend emerging among prepare for a more acculturated Hispanic American market, recognizing the power, among MIllennial and Gen-Xer bicultural Hispanic teenage Hispanic millennials where they actively influence, and needs of bicultural Hispanic American consumers. Americans making a deliberate effort to reclaim pursue and discover sister Hispanic cultures. Driven the heritage of their country of origin. Seen among by a curiosity to discover, combine or “mash up”, “The New Mainstream” second, third, and fourth-generation Hispanics, these share, and recreate their own heritage alongside hIsPanIC mIllennIals: by Guy Garcia segments seek to combine both US and their native other cultures, this phenomenon is attributed to the greatest OPPOrtunIty FOr grOwth Hispanic culture by creating a subculture that is helping broaden the “Latino consciousness”. This uniquely their own. This impacts their attitudes and fluid integration of culture is helping shape their The Hispanic market overall skews younger than the rest of the U.S. population. As behavior, including at the register. An example of this identities on many levels, resulting in what Guy the median age of Hispanics in 2009 was much younger (27.7 years) compared to in the beverage industry is demonstrated by a growing Garcia, the author of “The New Mainstream”, calls that of the population as a whole (36.8 years). Hispanic Millennials, teens in particular, number of bicultural Hispanic Americans fueling having “identity on shuffle”. represent one fifth of the overall teen market and are growing about six times faster the sales of non-alcoholic beverages like Malta -- a than other segments..10 In fact, about half of Hispanic males and females fall into the sweetened, malted dark beverage made of molasses On a broader level, music is perhaps the most 20-to 49-year-old age bracket.11 At over 12 million strong and with a purchasing power popular in Caribbean countries -- to Coconut and other recognizable category fueling this space of cultural of $285 billion, Hispanic American milliennials represent one of the greatest areas of tropical flavored soft drinks. The desire to retain and fusion & cross-pollination. Modern day Reggaeton opportunity for growth for brands now, and into the future. partake in what are traditional cultural norms while is a music genre that was born out of the millennial still maintaining a predominantly American identity is generation, giving rise to acts like Grammy Award The influence of Hispanic American millennials is evident throughout American an important aspect to bicultural Hispanic Americans, winning sensation Daddy Yankee. The genre is the culture today: music, dance, food, and fashion are just a few examples of the and a powerful insight for marketers to consider when cultural mash up of equal parts Hip Hop, Spanish powerful effect this market segment has on mainstream America. This has resulted engaging this consumer segment. language rap, and reggae rhythms, that when in cultural phenomenons known as “Retroaculturation” and “Intraculturation”. combined, results in a unique sound all its own. This cultural blending is helping redefine this generation of modern day Hispanic Americans.32 33
  18. 18. ACCuLTuRATIon It’s ImPaCt On InFluenCe & aFFluenCe When looking at acculturation rates in the seven total markets. Los Angeles and New York City key Hispanic DMA’s highlighted for this report (see alone represent 65% of this highly influential Acculturation, by definition refers to the adoption of a different, and typically more Table 5: Acculturation), we find that 40% of all consumer segment. In essence, by targeting these dominant culture. It is a process that affects Hispanics both native and foreign born Hispanic Americans consider themselves bicultural, bicultural consumers can help accelerate the sports that ultimately plays a major role in determining an individuals level of affluence. meaning they identify with both American and acceptance and growth overall, causing a ripple In short, a Hispanic’s ability to acculturate into American culture, can often aid that Hispanic cultures equally. This number represents effect throughout the industry. individual’s ability in several ways including: having greater control over the english a staggering 5.1 million consumers in just seven language, resulting in greater success in their academic pursuits, which ultimately results in higher waged employment. In many ways, acculturation can be considered for almost all Hispanic Americans, as the necessary step towards reaching the American dream. Table 5: Acculturation In the Hispanic market, the role that affluence plays is that of a conduit or gateway ACCULTURATION that helps expand ones own boundaries and experiences outside of the standard Acculturation Levels For Top Hispanic “Snow” DMA’s, 2010 norm. This participation as an early adopter is what ultimately propels consumers (HA1) (HA2) (HA3) (Combined) into the role as influencer within social networks. As evidenced earlier in the cases DMA Americanizado Nueva Latina Bicultural Total of Gaby Hernandez and Brian Deka Paupaw, being a pioneer can position that individual as a leader or teacher to others. Chicago 293,872 528,278 515,523 1,337,673 Denver 170,327 215,751 236,045 622,123 This often results in bicultural Hispanics serving as group leaders to lesser Los Angeles 1,170,608 2,066,603 2,110,127 5,347,338 New York 548,130 1,184,418 1,269,374 3,001,922 acculturated Hispanics. A bicultural’s ability to seamlessly float between both Sacramento-Stockton-Modesto 195,760 302,810 308,163 806,733 English and Spanish dominant worlds is an asset for them, providing them with San Francisco-San Jose 239,655 413,372 467,670 1,120,697 greater exposure to experiences that they ultimately bring back to share with their Washington, DC (Hagerstown) 91,282 190,627 218,555 500,464 cultural counterparts. Targeting these bicultural influencers who serve in these roles as guides and gatekeepers for their friends and family, presents the industry with an TOTAL (by Acculturation) 2,752,051 4,952,842 5,173,963 12,878,856 opportunity to accelerate the sports adoption exponentially. Source: Geoscape American Marketscape Data Stream 2010 Series HA 1 – Americanizado: English Dominant (nearly no Spanish), Born in US; 3rd+ generation, Few Hispanic cultural practices HA 2 – Nueva Latina: English Preferred (some Spanish), Born in U.S. 2nd generation, Some Hispanic cultural practices; often “retro-acculturate” HA 3 – Bicultural: Bi-Lingual (equal or nearly), Immigrant as child or young adult, Many Hispanic cultural practices34 35

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