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256837 Building Services Sample Show

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  • This workshop is designed to provide you with an overview of basic investment styles and asset classes and to help you understand the importance of building a diversified portfolio. Let’s get started. 215294 09/04
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 First, we’ll take a look at the importance of diversification and review some of the basics of investing. Next, we’ll examine the investment options and features of your Plan.
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 The idea behind diversification is pretty simple. Diversification is the concept of spreading risk by investing in different types of asset classes, sectors, and regions. In other words, diversification is the idea that you should not put all of your eggs in one basket. Remember, diversification doesn’t guarantee a profit or protect against a loss. It is possible to lose money in a diversified portfolio. 233289 6/06
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 Many of the investment options in your Plan are funds that pool your money with that of many other people who have similar goals. Depending on the fund’s investment goals, professional money managers use the pool of money to buy investments in one or more of the three asset classes – stocks, bonds, and capital preservation instruments. Stocks are shares or part ownership of a company. Bonds are IOUs from a company or government. Capital preservation instruments are short-term investments like U.S. Treasury bills. You can get a sense for the differences between these asset classes by looking at how they have performed over time. Of course, past performance does not guarantee future results. 233289 6/06
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 One way to classify stock is by capitalization range. There are small-cap, mid-cap, and large-cap stocks. Capitalization refers to the market value of a company and is calculated by multiplying the stock price by the number of outstanding shares. Small- and mid-cap stocks historically have been more volatile than large-cap stocks. 233289 6/06
  • This chart illustrates the performance of a hypothetical $1.00 investment made on 12/31/78 in small-cap stocks (represented by the Russell 2000 Index) and large-cap stocks (represented by the S&P 500 Index) as of 12/31/08. While both types of stocks have experienced long-term growth over the past 30 years, there have been periods of time when their performance has been very different. Of course, past performance is no guarantee of future results. The Russell 2000 Index is a subset of the Russell 3000 Index representing approximately 10% of the total market capitalization of that index. It includes approximately 2000 of the smallest securities based on a combination of their market cap and current index membership. S&P 500 Index includes 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy. Although the S&P 500 focuses on the large cap segment of the market, with approximately 75% coverage of U.S. equities, it is also an ideal proxy for the total market.
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 Whatever the size, stocks are categorized as either growth or value. Your investment “style” is defined by which of these stock types you favor. Growth stocks represent companies with rapidly expanding earnings growth. Growth stocks can be risky because investors may bail out if the growth rate slows, which in turn can drive the stock’s price down. Value stocks are “bargain” or out-of-favor stocks that are inexpensive relative to company earnings or assets. Value investors hope that, in time, the price of their stock will rise to reflect its true value; this expectation may or may not pay off. 233289 6/06
  • You can see from this chart that between growth and value categories of stocks, one type has outperformed the other at different times during the years. For example, value stocks have sometimes led the field, while at other times growth stocks have been the leader. There’s no telling what will happen in the future. Past performance does not guarantee future results. The Russell 3000 Growth Index measures the performance of the broad growth segment of the U.S. equity universe. It includes those Russell 3000 companies with higher price-to-book ratios and higher forecasted growth values. The Russell 3000 Value Index measures the performance of the broad value segment of U.S. equity value universe. It includes those Russell 3000 companies with lower price-to-book ratios and lower forecasted growth values.
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 Another way to categorize company stocks is geographically – as either domestic (based in the United States), or international (based outside the United States). 233289 6/06
  • Although investing abroad can seem a little frightening at first, consider that many of the products you use on a daily basis are from companies that call other countries their home. Globalization has helped to increase brand awareness with investors around the world. Investing internationally can help diversify your portfolio, as domestic and international markets do not always move up or down at the same times.
  • As you can see, domestic markets may outperform international markets at times, and at times the opposite may be true. The fact that these markets perform at different levels at different times is another key reason to make sure your investment portfolio is well diversified. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The MSCI EAFE Index (Europe, Australasia, Far East) is a free float-adjusted market capitalization index that is designed to measure the equity market performance of developed markets, excluding the US & Canada. S&P 500 Index includes 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy. Although the S&P 500 focuses on the large cap segment of the market, with approximately 75% coverage of U.S. equities, it is also an ideal proxy for the total market.
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 Like stocks, there are a number of different types of bonds, including U.S. Government bonds, corporate bonds, and mortgage-backed securities. Corporate bonds may offer higher yields than government bonds in exchange for more risk (there is a greater risk of a corporation defaulting than the U.S. government). There are also several types of securities that fall into the capital preservation category, including guaranteed investment contracts (typically issued by banks or insurance companies), certificates of deposit, and money market instruments. Money market funds are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC) or any other government agency. Although the fund seeks to maintain a constant share price of $1.00, it is still possible to lose money in this fund.
  • This chart illustrates the performance of a hypothetical $1.00 investment made on 12/31/78 in portfolios with various stock and bond allocations as of 12/31/08. Stocks are represented by the S&P 500 Index. Bonds are represented by the Barclay’s U.S. Aggregate Bond Index. S&P 500 Index includes 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy. Although the S&P 500 focuses on the large-cap segment of the market, with approximately 75% coverage of U.S. equities, it is also an ideal proxy for the total market. Barclay’s U.S. Aggregate Bond Index covers the USD-denominated, investment-grade, fixed-rate, taxable bond market of SEC-registered securities. The 100% stock portfolio provided the largest increase in wealth over the past 30 years. The 100% bond portfolio provided only a fraction of the growth provided by the stock portfolio. As illustrated in this image, portfolios with a greater allocation to stocks produced greater returns and a higher ending wealth value than those of portfolios allocated more heavily to bonds. However, these higher returns are associated with much greater volatility (risk). When creating your portfolio, it is important to weigh how much risk of losing money you are willing to accept in return for the potential of making money over the long term. This example is for illustrative purposes only and does not reflect the returns of any investment in your Plan, which will vary. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 A fund is a professionally managed investment that allows a group of investors to pool their money together with a predetermined investment objective. Funds typically invest in a combination of stocks, bonds, and/or capital preservation instruments.
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 To meet the needs of various investors, your Plan offers two ways to invest and diversify your retirement savings. You can choose a single professionally diversified “ready-mixed” portfolio, or you can mix your own portfolio. Why is diversification important? Because owning a mix of different investments – whether or not you choose them yourself – can help you reduce risk and increase your exposure to market opportunities. Of course, diversification does not guarantee a profit; you can still lose money in a diversified portfolio. 250019 2/08
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 Here are your ready-mixed options.These portfolios provide a range of choices for different levels of investor risk tolerance. The growth portfolio is weighted more heavily toward aggressive, higher-risk investments with greater return potential, while the conservative portfolio is weighted more heavily toward lower-risk investments with less return potential. 250397 2/08
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 Note to presenter: Be sure to include this slide with prediversified funds. 232534 6/06
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 Your Plan offers a range of investment choices to help you build a diversified portfolio. These sample investor profiles can help you decide how to diversify your money among the Plan’s fund styles, based on your goals, risk tolerance, and time horizon. The sample profiles take into consideration the time remaining until anticipated retirement at age 65, historical inflation rates, and risk and potential return relationships of the asset classes shown. You should not consider this investment advice. No other assumptions have been made. In applying the sample profiles to your individual situation, consider your assets, income, and investments, e.g., the equity in your home, other retirement plan and IRA assets, and your savings, in addition to your Plan account. You may wish to consult a financial advisor to review your financial situation. Call your Plan’s toll-free number if you have any questions. 232534 6/06
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 Here are the individual funds in the Plan you can choose from to create your own diversified portfolio. As you can see, you have a broad range of investments to choose from. The ones at the top are considered the most aggressive, meaning they offer higher potential reward in exchange for higher risk, while the ones at the bottom are more conservative and therefore offer less risk and lower potential return. How you invest will depend on your age, time horizon until retirement, and tolerance for investment risk. For example, as you near retirement, you may want to consider investing more conservatively, as you’ll have less time to recover from any downturns in the stock market. It is important to note that an investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other governmental agency. Although the fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1.00 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund. 215294 05/05
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 [Note to presenter: This slide MUST be included when discussing mix-your-own investment options. It MUST directly follow the preceding slide.] 232534 6/06
  • Here’s an example. At the beginning of the year, an investor invests $1,000 among four funds, diversifying his portfolio based on his risk tolerance and investment goals. By year end, due to uneven price movements among investments, the portfolio’s allocation has shifted from its initial strategy. Without rebalancing, the investor could inadvertently take on more or less investment risk in a certain asset category than intended, and that difference may likely be reflected in the portfolio’s future returns. In this example, growth was the worst-performing asset class. Because the portfolio’s growth allocation went from an initial 60% to 52.2% due to poorer performance, the investor would need to rebalance to get back to his initial allocation. 233289 6/06
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 You have access to your Plan account either by using the Plan’s personalized website, www.ibenefitcenter.com, or by using the Plan’s automated toll-free number. You also have access to Service Representatives any business day. 233289 6/06
  • M256837_Building Services_Diversification_Show 12/30/11 Before investing, consider the funds' or investment options' investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses. Call 1-800-752-2697 for a prospectus and, if available, a summary prospectus, or an offering circular containing this and other information. Read it carefully. 232534 6/06
  • Transcript

    • 1.  
    • 2. Agenda
      • Why diversify
      • The basics of investing
      • Your Plan’s investment options
      • Managing your account
    • 3. Why diversify
      • Owning a variety of investments helps reduce the impact of a decline in any one area
      • Diversification helps provide a balance for the good and bad times
      • Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against a loss. It is possible to lose money in a diversified portfolio.
    • 4. First…some investment basics
      • Stocks
          • Shares or part ownership of a company
          • Offer the opportunity to build wealth
      • Bonds
          • IOUs from a company or government
          • Offer the potential for greater stability
      • Capital preservation instruments
          • Short-term investments (e.g., U.S. Treasury bills)
          • Seek stability of principal and liquidity
    • 5. Stock sizes
      • Small-cap
          • Small companies that offer innovative products and services
          • Because of their small size, these companies may present volatility and liquidity risks
      • Mid-cap
          • Mid-size companies may have a faster growth rate than larger companies
          • May also have more stability than smaller companies
      • Large-cap
          • Larger companies tend to be the most stable because of their asset size
          • May offer proven products and services but slower potential growth rate
          • May fall out of favor and underperform small or mid-cap stocks
      Small- and mid-cap stocks historically have been more volatile than large-cap stocks.
    • 6. Stock market performance 1978–2008 Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Hypothetical value of $1 invested at the end of 1978. Small stocks are represented by the Russell 2000 Index, large stocks are represented by the S&P 500 Index. The Russell 2000 Index measures the performance of the small-cap segment of the U.S. equity universe. The Russell 2000 Index is a subset of the Russell 3000 Index representing approximately 10% of the total market capitalization of that index. It includes approximately 2000 of the smallest securities based on a combination of their market cap and current index membership. S&P 500 Index includes 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy. Although the S&P 500 focuses on the large cap segment of the market, with approximately 75% coverage of U.S. equities, it is also an ideal proxy for the total market. Assumes reinvestment of income, and no transaction costs or taxes. This is for illustrative purposes only and not indicative of any investment. An investment cannot be made directly in an index. $21.70 $22.89 Small-cap stocks Large-cap stocks GROWTH OF $1.00 INVESTMENT
    • 7. Stock styles
      • Growth stocks
          • Pursue rapidly rising profits
          • Can have higher volatility
          • Have high long-term growth expectations
      • Value stocks
          • Known as “cheap stocks”
          • Are for investors hoping for a rebound
          • Have potentially higher yields; can pay dividends
    • 8. Growth and value by decade Compound annual rates of return by year Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Based on the years 1984–2008. Growth stocks are represented by the Russell 3000 Growth Index, value stocks are represented by the Russell 3000 Value Index. The Russell 3000 Growth Index measures the performance of the broad growth segment of the U.S. equity universe. It includes those Russell 3000 companies with higher price-to-book ratios and higher forecasted growth values. The Russell 3000 Value Index measures the performance of the broad value segment of U.S. equity value universe. It includes those Russell 3000 companies with lower price-to-book ratios and lower forecasted growth values. This is for illustrative purposes only and not indicative of any investment. An investment cannot be made directly in an index. (%)
      • Growth stocks
      • Value stocks
    • 9. Investing globally
      • Domestic
        • U.S. companies
      • International
        • Non-U.S. companies
        • Generally greater risk
        • Risks of international investing
        • Currency fluctuations
        • Economic and political instability
        • Illiquidity and volatility
    • 10. Global household names
        • Coca-Cola
        • Ford
        • General Electric
        • Harley-Davidson
        • Home Depot
        • McDonald’s
        • Microsoft
        • Nike
        • Proctor & Gamble
        • Starbucks
        • Wal-Mart
        • Walt Disney
        • Adidas (Germany)
        • Electrolux (Sweden)
        • Hyundai (S. Korea)
        • Michelin (France)
        • Nestle (Switzerland)
        • Nintendo (Japan)
        • Nokia (Finland)
        • Samsung (S. Korea)
        • Sony (Japan)
        • Tom Tom (Netherlands)
        • Toyota (Japan)
        • Volkswagen (Germany)
      Source: The 2008 Global 2000, Forbes.com. Domestic International
    • 11. Global investing 1978–2008
      • Past performance is no guarantee of future results. International stocks are represented by the MSCI EAFE Index. U.S. stocks are represented by the S&P 500 Index. The MSCI EAFE Index (Europe, Australasia, Far East) is a free float-adjusted market capitalization index that is designed to measure the equity market performance of developed markets, excluding the U.S. & Canada. S&P 500 Index includes 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy. Although the S&P 500 focuses on the large-cap section of the market, with approximately 75% coverage of U.S. equities, it is also an ideal proxy for the total market. This is for illustrative purposes only and is not indicative of any investment. An investment cannot be made directly in an index.
      (%) ANNUAL RETURN International stocks U.S. Stocks
    • 12. Types of bonds and capital preservation instruments
      • Bonds
        • U.S. Treasury and agency securities
          • T-bills, bonds, and notes
          • Mortgage-backed bonds
        • Corporate bonds
          • Investment-grade
          • High-yield
      • Capital preservation
          • Guaranteed investment contracts (GICs)
          • Certificates of deposit (CDs)
          • Money market instruments*
      * Money market funds are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC) or any other government agency. Although the fund seeks to maintain a constant share price of $1.00, it is still possible to lose money in this fund.
    • 13. Long-term portfolio performance 1978–2008 Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Hypothetical value of $1.00 invested at the end of 1978. Stocks are represented by the S&P 500 Index. Bonds are represented by the Barclay’s U.S. Aggregate Bond Index. S&P 500 Index includes 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy. Although the S&P 500 focuses on the large-cap segment of the market, with approximately 75% coverage of U.S. equities, it is also an ideal proxy for the total market. Barclay’s U.S. Aggregate Bond Index covers the USD-denominated, investment-grade, fixed-rate, taxable bond market of SEC-registered securities. Assumes reinvestment of income and no transaction costs or taxes. This is for illustrative purposes only and not indicative of any investment. An investment cannot be made directly in an index. $22.89 $21.21 $18.52 $15.32 $12.04 GROWTH OF A $1.00 INVESTMENT
      • Portfolio 1 (100% Stocks)
      • Portfolio 2 (75% Stocks, 25% Bonds)
      • Portfolio 3 (50% Stocks, 50% Bonds)
      • Portfolio 4 (25% Stocks, 75% Bonds)
      • Portfolio 5 (100% Bonds)
    • 14. What is a fund?
      • An investment that allows a group of investors to pool their money together with a predetermined investment objective
      • Typically invests in a combination of stocks, bonds, and/or capital preservation instruments
      • Professionally managed
    • 15. What are the Plan’s investment options? The Plan offers two ways to invest
      • Choose a ready-mixed portfolio
        • Make a single investment choice to professionally diversify your Plan account across an array of funds
      • Mix your own portfolio
        • Choose your own diversified combination of individual funds in the Plan
      Diversification does not guarantee a profit; you can still lose money in a diversified portfolio.
    • 16. Your investment options Ready-mixed investment options PUTNAM ASSET ALLOCATION: GROWTH PORTFOLIO PUTNAM ASSET ALLOCATION: BALANCED PORTFOLIO PUTNAM ASSET ALLOCATION: CONSERVATIVE PORTFOLIO See following slide for additional information on how funds are ranked. Higher risk/higher potential reward Lower risk/lower potential reward
    • 17.
      • Putnam Asset Allocation Funds are ranked according to market and credit risk. Market risk measures how sensitive a fund may be to economic and market changes. Market risk is generally higher for funds that invest heavily in stocks. Credit risk measures how susceptible a fund’s income holdings may be to the nonpayment of principal or interest by the issuer. These rankings are relative only to the funds on the previous slide and should not be compared with the rankings of other investments. The information is not meant as investment advice. There can be no assurance that any one fund will have less risk or more reward than any other fund. Diversification does not guarantee a profit; you can still lose money in a diversified portfolio. Some of the underlying funds held by Putnam Asset Allocation Funds invest in international securities, which involve risks such as currency fluctuations, economic instability, and political developments. Some of the underlying funds invest some or all of their assets in small and/or midsize companies, which increases the risk of greater price fluctuations. Some of the underlying funds also invest a significant portion of their assets in bonds. Mutual funds that invest in bonds are subject to certain risks including interest rate risk, credit risk, and inflation risk. As interest rates rise, bond prices fall. Long-term bonds have more exposure to interest rate risk than short-term bonds. Lower-rated bonds may offer higher yields in return for more risk. Unlike bonds, bond funds have ongoing fees and expenses.
    • 18. Consider these sample investor profiles TYPICAL ALLOCATION TIME HORIZON RISK TOLERANCE GOAL The sample profiles take into consideration the time remaining until anticipated retirement at age 65, historical inflation rates, and risk and potential return relationships of the asset classes shown. You should not consider this investment advice. No other assumptions have been made. In applying the sample profiles to your individual situation, consider your assets, income, and investments (e.g., the equity in your home, other retirement plan and IRA assets, and your savings) in addition to your Plan account. You may wish to consult a financial advisor to review your financial situation. Call your Plan’s toll-free number if you have any questions. 30% 30% 5% 5% 30% 20% 20% 20% 10% 30% 15% 15% 35% 15% 20% 10% 50% 20% 10% 10% Growth Blend Value Income Capital preservation 5 years or less Low to moderate Income and inflation protection 5–10 years Moderate Conservative growth 10–20 years High to moderate Growth 20 years or more High Maximum growth
    • 19. Your investment options Mix your own portfolio options * An investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other governmental agency. Although the fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1.00 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund. Lower risk/ lower potential reward Higher risk/ higher potential reward
      • GROWTH American Funds The Growth Fund of America Artisan Mid Cap Fund TCW Galileo Select Equities Fund
      • BLEND Columbia Acorn Fund Harbor Capital International Fund Northern Trust Daily S&P 500 Equity Index Fund
      • VALUE Janus Perkins Mid Cap Value Fund Allianz NFJ Small Cap Value Fund Vanguard Value Index Fund
      • INCOME Federated Total Return Government Bond Fund
      • CAPITAL PRESERVATION Putnam Money Market Fund*
    • 20.
      • The previous slide is intended not as investment advice but rather as a general guide to investment style risk/potential reward profiles. The funds are listed in alphabetical order under each style category; categories are ranked according to market and credit risk. Because blend funds have the flexibility to invest in both growth and value stocks in varying proportions, at any given time they may have a higher or lower risk/potential reward profile than growth or value funds. The funds may invest in international securities, which involve risks such as currency fluctuations, economic instability, and political developments. Some of the funds may invest some or all of their assets in small and/or midsize companies, which increases the risk of greater price fluctuations. Mutual funds that invest in bonds are subject to certain risks including interest rate risk, credit risk, and inflation risk. As interest rates rise, bond prices fall. Long-term bonds are more exposed to interest rate risk than short-term bonds. Unlike bonds, bond funds have ongoing fees and expenses. These risks apply to any fund with a significant portion of its holdings in bonds. There can be no assurance that any fund will experience less volatility or greater reward than any other fund.
    • 21. The role of rebalancing * Compounded monthly. This hypothetical illustration does not reflect the actual performance of funds in your Plan, which will fluctuate. Rebalancing does not guarantee a profit or prevent a loss in declining markets. Initial allocation Year-end allocation YEAR-END ALLOCATION 12/31/2008 PERFORMANCE 1/1/2007–12/31/2008* INITIAL ALLOCATION 1/1/2008 $104 11.3% +4% $100 10% Capital preservation fund D $108 11.7% +8% $100 10% Income fund C $228 24.8% +14% $200 20% Value fund B $480 52.2% -20% $600 60% Growth fund A
    • 22. How can I manage my Plan account?
      • 1. www.ibenefitcenter.com available virtually 24/7
      • 2. Automated phone service available virtually 24/7 by calling 1-800-752-2697
      • 3. Service Representatives available at the above number between 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. Eastern Time, any business day
    • 23. Mercer Securities A division of MMC Securities Corp., Member FINRA/SIPC Before investing, consider the funds’ or investment options’ investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. Call 1-800-752-2697 for a prospectus and, if available, a summary prospectus, or an offering circular containing this and other information. Read it carefully. M256837 1/10

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