Second year-english-workbook

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Second year-english-workbook

  1. 1. WARMING UPWorkbook AffordingReinforcement Materials forIndividual Needs Geared forUnderstanding and ProgressAn English Workbook for the Second YearNueva Valencia National High School
  2. 2. Table of ContentsThe First Quarter: Narrative........................................................................................................................5 The Story of the Aged Mother.................................................................................................................6 The Cricket Boy........................................................................................................................................7 The Spider’s Thread.................................................................................................................................9 The Two Brothers..................................................................................................................................11 The Lady Chang......................................................................................................................................13 The Chinese Cinderella..........................................................................................................................15 Creating the Earth..................................................................................................................................16 The Forbidden Fruit...............................................................................................................................17 God Leaves the World...........................................................................................................................17 The Gentlemen of the Jungle.................................................................................................................17The Second Quarter: Drama......................................................................................................................19 The Calabashi Kids.................................................................................................................................20 Ramayana..............................................................................................................................................23 Oli Impan, An Excerpt............................................................................................................................26 The Magic Brocade................................................................................................................................30 A Tale of China.......................................................................................................................................30 The Crystal Heart...................................................................................................................................33 A Vietnamese Legend............................................................................................................................33 Shakuntala: A Summary ........................................................................................................................37 The Gifts of Wali Dad.............................................................................................................................38 Laarni, A Dream.....................................................................................................................................45 Treasury of Loyal Retainers, An Excerpt................................................................................................48 Yoshitune and the Thousand Cherry Trees ...............................................................................................................................................................49 Madman on the Roof.............................................................................................................................54
  3. 3. The Third Quarter: Poetry..........................................................................................................................56 Air Castles..............................................................................................................................................57 Bewildered Arab...................................................................................................................................58 Sonnet XXVI...........................................................................................................................................59 I, Too, Sing America...............................................................................................................................60 To the Sons of India...............................................................................................................................60 Reflection...............................................................................................................................................61 Circle of Life...........................................................................................................................................61 Heal Our Land........................................................................................................................................62 Africas Plea...........................................................................................................................................63 A Japanese Folk Song from Aomori.......................................................................................................63 The Tame Bird was in a Cage.................................................................................................................64 Lead Me, Lord........................................................................................................................................64 Sing Me Your Song Again Daddy............................................................................................................66 Lift Up Your Hands to God.....................................................................................................................67 Please Be Careful with my Heart............................................................................................................67The Fourth Quarter: Essay.........................................................................................................................78 Mother Teresa, The Saint of Gutters.....................................................................................................79 Story of a Saint.......................................................................................................................................79 The Moorish Banquet............................................................................................................................81 The Blacks..............................................................................................................................................82 The World in a Train..............................................................................................................................89Language Focus.........................................................................................................................................92 Simple Past Tense..................................................................................................................................93 Time Transition Words...........................................................................................................................94 Adverbs..................................................................................................................................................97 Verbals...................................................................................................................................................99
  4. 4. Using Imperatives................................................................................................................................101Adjectives in a Series...........................................................................................................................103Spatial Order of Details........................................................................................................................104Objective and Subjective Details in Description...................................................................................105
  5. 5. The First Quarter: Narrative
  6. 6. The Story of the Aged Mother A Japanese Folktale Long, long ago there lived at the foot of the mountain a poor farmer and his aged, widowed mother.They owned a bit of land which supplied them with food, and their humble were peaceful and happy. Shinano was governed by a despotic leader who though a warrior, had a great and cowardlyshrinking from anything suggestive of failing health and strength. This caused him to send out a cruelproclamation. The entire province was given strict orders to immediately put to death all aged people.Those were barbarous days, and the custom of abandoning old people to die was not common. The poorfarmer loved his aged mother with tender reverence, and the order filled his heart with sorrow. But no oneever thought a second time about obeying the mandate of the governor, so with many deep hopeless sighs,the youth prepared for what at that time was considered the kindest mode of death. Just at sundown, when his day’s work was ended, he took a quantity of unwhitened rice which isprincipal food for poor, cooked and dried it, and tying it in a square cloth, swung and bundle around his neckalong with a gourd filled with cool, sweet water. Then he lifted his helpless old mother to his back and statedon his painful journey up the mountain. The road was long and steep; the narrowed road was crossed andrecrossed by many paths made by the hunters and woodcutters. In some place, they mingled in a confusedpuzzled, but he gave no heed. One path or another, it mattered not. On he went, climbing blindly upward –ever upward towards the high bare summit of what is know as Obatsuyama, the mountain of the“abandoning of aged.” The eyes of the old mother were not so dim but that they noted the reckless hastening from onepath to another, and her loving heart grew anxious. Her son did not know the mountain’s many paths andhis return might be one of danger, so she stretched forth her hand and snapping the twigs from brushes asthey passed, she quietly dropped a handful every few steps of the way so that they climbed, the narrow pathbehind them was dotted at frequently intervals with tiny piles of twigs. At last the summit was reached.Weary and heart sick, the youth gently released his burden and silently prepared a place of comfort as hislast duty to the loved one. Gathering fallen pine needle, he made a soft cushion and tenderly lifting his oldmother therein, he wrapped her padded coat more closely about the stooping shoulders and with tearfuleyes and an aching heart said farewell. The trembling mother’s voice was full of unselfish love as she gave her last injunction. “Let not thineeyes be blinded, my son,” she said. “The mountain road is full of dangers. Look carefully and follow the pathwhich holds the piles of twigs. They will guide you to the familiar way farther down.” The son’s surprisedeyes looked back over the path, then at the poor old, shriveled hands all scratched and soiled by their work oflove. His heart smote him and bowing to the grounds, he cried aloud: “Oh, Honorable mother, thy kindnessthrusts my heart! I will not leave thee. Together we will follow the path of twigs, and together we will die!” Once more he shouldered his burden (how light it seemed now) and hastened down the path,through the shadows and the moonlight, to the little hut in the valley. Beneath the kitchen floor was awalled closet for food, which was covered and hidden from view. There the son met his mother, supplyingher with everything needful and continually watching and fearing. Time passed, and he was beginning to feelsafe when again the governor sent forth heralds bearing an unreasonable order, seemingly as a boast of hispower. His demand was that his subject should present him with a rope of ashes. The entire provincetrembled with dread. The order must be obeyed yet who in all Shinano could make a rope of ashes? One night, in great distress, the son whispered the news to his hidden mother. “Wait!” she said. “Iwill think. I will think.” On the second day she told him what to do. “Make rope twisted straw,” she said.“Then stretch it upon a row of flat stones and burn it there on the windless night.” He called the peopletogether and did as she said and when the blaze and died, behold upon the stones with every twist and fibershowing perfectly lay a rope of ashes.
  7. 7. The governor was pleased at the wit of the youth and praised greatly, but he demanded to knowwhere he had obtained his wisdom. “Alas! Alas!” cried the farmer, “the truth must be told!” and with deepbows he related his story. The governor listened and then meditated in silence. Finally he lifted his head.“Shinano needs more than strength of youth,” he said gravely. “Ah, that I should have forgotten the well-know saying, “with the crown of snow, there cometh a wisdom!” That very hour the cruel law was abolished,and custom drifted into as far a past that only legends remains. The Cricket Boy A Chinese Tale A long time ago, cricket fighting caught on in the imperial court, with the emperor leading the fad. Alocal magistrate in Huayin, who wanted to win the favor of the monarch, tried in every way to get him thebest fighting crickets. He had a strategy for doing so: He managed to get a cricket that was very good atfighting. He then made his subordinates go to the heads of each village and force them to send in a constantsupply of fighting crickets. He would send to the imperial court the crickets that could beat the one he waskeeping. Theoretically, everything should have worked smoothly. However, as the magistrate was extremelyzealous to please the emperor, he meted out harsh punishment on any village heads who failed toaccomplish their tasks. The village heads in turn shifted the burden to the poor villagers, who had to searchfor the crickets. If they failed to catch them, they had to purchase them from someone else, or they had topay a levy in cash. The small insects suddenly became a rare commodity. Speculators hoarded good crickets, buyingthem at a bargain and selling them for an exorbitant price. Many village heads worked hand in hand with thespeculators to make profits. In so doing, they bankrupted many a family. Cheng Ming was one such villager. The head of his village delegated part of his duties to him becausehe found Cheng Ming easy to push around. Cheng Ming did not want to bully his fellow villagers as the villagehead did him, so he often had to pay cash out of his own pocket when he failed to collect any competentcrickets. Soon the little proper ties he had were draining away, and he went into a severe depression. Oneday, he said to his wife that he wanted to die. “Death is easy, but what will our son do without you?” asked his wife, glancing at their only son,sleeping on the kang. “Why can’t we look for the crickets ourselves instead of buying them? Perhaps we’llstrike some good luck.” Cheng Ming gave up the idea of suicide and went to search for crickets. Armed with a tiny basket ofcopper wires for catching crickets and a number of small bamboo tubes for holding them, he went about thetedious task. Each day he got up at dawn and did not return until late in the evening. He searched beneathbrick debris, dike crevices, and in the weeds and bushes. Days went by, and he caught only a few mediocrecrickets that did not measure up to the magistrate’s standards. His worries increased as the dead line drewcloser and closer. The day for cricket delivery finally came, but Cheng Ming could not produce any good ones. He wasclubbed a hundred times on the buttocks, a form of corporal punishment in the ancient Chinese judicialsystem. When he was released the next day, he could barely walk. The wound on his buttocks confined himto bed for days and further delayed his search for crickets. He thought of committing suicide again. His wifedid not know what to do. Then they heard about a hunchbacked fortune teller who was visiting the village. Cheng Ming’s wifewent to see him. The fortune teller gave her a piece of paper with a picture on it. It was a pavilion with ajiashan (rock garden) behind it. On the bushes by the jiashan sat a fat male cricket. Beside it, however, lurked
  8. 8. a large toad, ready to catch the insect with its long, elastic tongue. When the wife got home, she showed thepaper to her husband. Cheng Ming sprang up and jumped to the floor, forgetting the pain in his buttocks. “This is the fortune teller’s hint at the location where I can find a perfect cricket to accomplish mytask!” he exclaimed. “But we don’t have a pavilion in our village,” his wife re minded him. “Well, take a closer look and think. Doesn’t the temple on the east side of our village have a rockgarden? That must be it.” So saying, Cheng Ming limped to the temple with the support of a make shiftcrutch. Sure enough, he saw the cricket, and the toad squatting nearby in the rock garden at the back of thetemple. He caught the big, black male cricket just before the toad got hold of it. Back home, he carefullyplaced the cricket in a jar he had prepared for it and stowed the jar away in a safe place. “Everything will beover tomorrow,” he gave a sigh of relief and went to tell his best friends in the village the good news. Cheng Ming’s nine-year-old son was very curious. Seeing his father was gone, he took the jar andwanted to have a peek at the cricket. He was removing the lid carefully, when the big cricket jumped out andhopped away. Panicked, the boy tried to catch the fleeing cricket with his hands, but in a flurry, heaccidentally squashed the insect when he finally got hold of it. “Good heavens! What’re you going to say to your father when he comes back?” the mother said indistress and dread. Without a word, the boy went out of the room, tears in his eyes. Cheng Ming became distraught when he saw the dead cricket. He couldn’t believe that all his hopeshad been dashed in a second. He looked around for his son, vowing to teach the little scoundrel a goodlesson. He searched inside and outside the house, only to locate him in a well at the corner of the court yard.When he fished him out, the boy was already dead. The father’s fury instantly gave way to sorrow. Thegrieved parents laid their son on the kang and lamented over his body the entire night. As Cheng Ming was dressing his son for burial the next morning, he felt the body still warm.Immediately he put the boy back on the kang, hoping that he would revive. Gradually the boy came back tolife, but to his parents’ dismay, he was unconscious, as if he were in a trance. The parents grieved again for the loss of their son. Suddenly they heard a cricket chirping. The coupletraced the sound to a small cricket on the door step. The appearance of the cricket, however, dashed theirhopes, for it was very small. “Well, it’s better than nothing,” Cheng Ming thought. He was about to catch it,when it jumped nimbly on to a wall, cheeping at him. He tip toed to ward it, but it showed no sign of fleeing.Instead, when Cheng Ming came a few steps closer, the little cricket jumped onto his chest. Though small, the cricket looked smart and energetic. Cheng Ming planned to take it to the villagehead. Uncertain of its capabilities, Cheng Ming could not go to sleep. He wanted to put the little cricket to thetest before sending it to the village head. The next morning, Cheng Ming went to a young man from a rich family in his neighborhood, havingheard him boasting about an “invincible” cricket that he wanted to sell for a high price. When the young manshowed his cricket, Cheng Ming hesitated, because his little cricket seemed no match for this gigantic insect.To fight this monster would be to condemn his dwarf to death. “There’s no way my little cricket could survive a confrontation with your big guy,” Cheng Ming saidto the young man, holding his jar tight. The young man goaded and taunted him. At last, Cheng Ming decidedto take a risk. “Well, it won’t hurt to give a try. If the little cricket is a good-for-nothing, what’s the use ofkeeping it anyway?” he thought. When they put the two crickets together in a jar, Cheng Ming’s small insect seemed transfixed. Nomatter how the young man prodded it to fight, it simply would not budge. The young man burst into aguffaw, to the great embarrassment of Cheng Ming. As the young man spurred the little cricket on, it suddenly seemed to have run out of patience. With great wrath, it charged the giant opponent head on. Thesudden burst of action stunned both the young man and Cheng Ming. Before the little creature planted itssmall but sharp teeth into the neck of the big cricket, the terrified young man fished the big insect out of the
  9. 9. jar just in time and called off the contest. The little cricket chirped victoriously, and Cheng Ming feltexceedingly happy and proud. Cheng Ming and the young man were commenting on the little cricket’s extraordinary prowess,when a big rooster rushed over to peck at the little cricket in the jar. The little cricket hopped out of the jar intime to dodge the attack. The rooster then went for it a second time, but suddenly began to shake its headviolently, screaming in agony. This sudden turn of events baffled Cheng Ming and the onlookers. When theytook a closer look, they could not believe their eyes: The little cricket was gnawing on the rooster’s bloodycomb. The story of a cricket fighting a rooster soon spread throughout the village and beyond. The next day, Cheng Ming, along with the village head, sent the cricket to the magistrate and askedfor a test fight with his master cricket, but the magistrate re fused on the ground that Cheng Ming’s cricketwas too small. “I don’t think you have heard its rooster-fighting story,” Cheng Ming proclaimed with great pride.“You can’t judge it only by its appearance.” “Nonsense, how can a cricket fight a rooster?” asked the magistrate. He ordered a big roosterbrought to his office, thinking that Cheng Ming would quit telling his tall tales when his cricket became thebird’s snack. The battle between the little cricket and the rooster ended with the same result: The roostersped away in great pain, the little cricket chirping triumphantly on its heels. The magistrate was first astonished and then pleased, thinking that he finally had the very insect thatcould win him the emperor’s favor. He had a golden cage manufactured for the little cricket. Placing itcautiously in the cage, he took it to the emperor. The emperor pitted the little cricket against all his veteran combat ant crickets, and it defeated themone by one. What amused the emperor most was that the little creature could even dance to the tune of hiscourt music! Extremely pleased with the magic little creature, the emperor rewarded the magistrate liberallyand promoted him to a higher position. The magistrate, now a governor, in turn exempted Cheng Ming fromhis levies in cash as well as crickets. A year later, Cheng Ming’s son came out of his stupor. He sat up and rubbed his eyes, to the greatsurprise and joy of his parents. The first words he uttered to his jubilant parents were, “I’m so tired andhungry.” After a hot meal, he told them, “I dreamed that I had become a cricket, and I fought a lot of othercrickets. It was such fun! You know what? The greatest fun I had was my fight with a couple of roosters!” The Spider’s Thread By Akutagawa Ryunosuke One day, the Buddha was strolling alone along the edge of a lotus pond in Paradise. The bloominglotus flowers in the pond were each pure white like jewels, and the place was filled with the indescribablywondrous fragrance continually emitted from each flower’s golden center. It was just morning in Paradise. After a time, the Buddha paused at the edge of the pond and from between the lotus leaves thatcovered it saw a glimpse of the state of things below. Now this celestial pond just happened to lie directlyover Hell, and peering through that crystal-clear water was like looking through a magnifying glass at theRiver of Death and the Mountain of Needles and such. The Buddha saw there, in the depths of Hell, a single man writhing along with the other sinners. Thisman was named Kandata, and he had been a notorious thief who had performed murder and arson andother acts of evil. In his past, however, he had performed just one good deed: one day, when walkingthrough the deep forest, he saw a spider crawling along the road. At first he raised his foot to crush it, but
  10. 10. suddenly he changed his mind and stopped, saying, “No, small though it may be, a spider, too, has life. Itwould be a pity to meaninglessly end it,” and so did not kill it. Looking down upon the captives in Hell the Buddha recalled this kind act that Kandata hadperformed, and thought to use his good deed as a way to save him from his fate. Looking aside, there on ajade-colored lotus leaf he saw a single spider, spinning out a web of silver thread. The Buddha carefully tookthe spider’s thread into his hand, and lowered it straight down between the jewel-like white lotuses into thedepths of Hell. Kandata was floating and sinking along with the other sinners in the Lake of Blood at the bottom ofHell. It was pitch black no matter which way he looked, and the occasional glimpse of light that he would seein the darkness would turn out to be just the glint of the terrible Mountain of Needles. How lonely he musthave felt! All about him was the silence of the grave, the only occasional sound being a faint sigh from one ofthe damned. Those who were so evil as to be sent to this place were tired by its various torments, and leftwithout even the strength to cry out. Even the great thief Kandata could only squirm like a dying frog as hechoked in the Lake of Blood. But one day, raising up his head and glancing at the sky above the lake, in the empty darknessKandata saw a silver spider’s thread being lowered from the ceiling so far, far away. The thread seemedalmost afraid to be seen, emitting a frail, constant light as it came down to just above Kandata’s head. Seeingthis, Kandata couldn’t help but clap his hands in joy. If he were to cling to this thread and climb up it, he maybe able to climb out of Hell! Perhaps he could even climb all the way to Paradise! Then he would never bechased up the Mountain of Needles, nor drowned in the Lake of Blood again. Thinking so, he firmly grasped the spider’s thread with both hands and began to climb the thread,higher and higher. Having once been a great thief, he was used to tasks such as this. But the distancebetween Hell and Paradise is tens of thousands of miles, and so it would seem that no amount of effortwould make this an easy journey. After climbing for some time Kandata tired, and couldn’t climb a bit higher.Having no other recourse, he hung there from the thread, resting, and while doing so looked down below. He saw that he had made a good deal of progress. The Lake of Blood that he had been trapped inwas now hidden in the dark below, and he had even climbed higher than the dimly glowing Mountain ofNeedles. If he could keep up this pace, perhaps he could escape from Hell after all. Kandata grasped thethread with both hands, and laughingly spoke in a voice that he hadn’t used in the many years since he hadcome here, “I’ve done it! I’ve done it!” Looking down, however, what did he see but an endless queue of sinners, intently following him upthe thread like a line of ants! Seeing this, surprise and fear kept Kandata hanging there for a time with mouthopen and eyes blinking like a fool. How could this slender spider’s web, which should break even under justhis weight, support the weight of all these other people? If the thread were to snap, all of his effort would bewasted and he would fall back into Hell with the others! That just would not do. But even as he thought thesethoughts, hundreds more, thousands more of the damned came crawling up from the Lake of Blood, forminga line and scurrying up the thread. If he didn’t do something fast, surely the thread would snap in the middleand he would fall back down. Kandata shouted out, “Hey! You sinners! This thread is mine! Who said you could climb up it? Getoff! Get off!” Though the thread had been fine until just then, with these words it snapped with a twang rightwhere Kandata held it. Poor Kandata fell headfirst through the air, spinning like a top, right down through thedarkness. The severed end of the silver thread hung there, suspended from heaven, shining with its pale lightin that moonless, starless sky. The Buddha stood in Paradise at the edge of the lotus pond, silently watching these events. AfterKandata sank like a stone to the bottom of the Lake of Blood, he continued his stroll with a sad face. He musthave been surprised that even after such severe punishment Kandata’s lack of compassion would lead himright back into Hell.
  11. 11. Yet the lotus blossoms in the lotus ponds of Paradise care nothing about such matters. Their jewel-like white flowers waved about the feet of the Buddha, and each flower’s golden center continuously filledthe place with their indescribably wondrous fragrance. It was almost noon in Paradise. The Two Brothers An Ancient Egyptian Story There were once two brothers, Anpu was the older, Bata was the younger. Anpu had a wife, andowned a farm. Bata came to live with Anpu and his wife. Bata worked hard for his brother, plowing the fields,and harvesting the grain, and doing many other tasks. He was very good at his work. The animals would evenspeak to him. One day Anpu announced that it was time to plow the fields and sow the seeds. And he instructedhis brother to take sacks of seed out to the fields. They spent the next few days plowing and sowing seeds. Then Anpu sent Bata back for more seeds. At Anpus house, Bata found Anpus wife fixing her hair.Bata said, "Get up and get me some seed, Anpu is waiting." Anpus wife replied, "Get the seed yourself. Im busy with my hair." Bata found a large basket, and filled it with seed. And, he carried the basket through the house. Anpus wife said, "What is the weight of that basket you carry." Bata replied, "There are three sacks of wheat and two of barley." She said, "How strong you are, and handsome. Stay with me and let us make love. And Anpu willnever know." Bata replied in horror, "Anpu is like a father to me, and you are like a mother to me. I wont tellanyone of the evil words that you have said. And never let me hear them again." He picked up his basket, andrushed out into the fields. When Anpu got back home, he realized that something was wrong. No fire had been lit, no food hadbeen cooked, and his wife was in bed moaning and weeping. Her clothes were torn, and she seemed to bebruised. Anpu demanded that she tell him what had happened. She replied, "When your brother came to fetch the seed, he saw me fixing my hair. He tried to makelove to me. And I refused, saying, Is not Anpu like a father to you? And am I not like a mother to you? Andhe became angry, and beat me. And he said that he would hurt me more if I told you what had happened. OhAnpu, kill him for me, or I will surely die." Anpu was angry like a leopard. He took a spear, and hid behind the door of the cattle pen, waiting tokill his brother. When the sun had gone down, Bata returned with the cattle. The first cow said to Bata, "Yourbrother hides with a spear, behind the door. And he plans to kill you. Run away while you can." Bata would not believe the cow. But the second cow gave him the same warning. Then he saw hisbrothers feet behind the door. And he was afraid and ran away. Anpu chased him in great anger. As he ran,Bata called out to Ra, "O my good lord, who judges between the bad and the good, save me." And Ra heard Batas prayer, and caused a river to flow between them. The river was wide and full ofcrocodiles. The two brothers stood on opposite banks of the river. Bata shouted to Anpu, "Ra delivers thewicked to the just. But I must leave you. Why did you try to kill me, without giving me a chance to explain?"And Bata told his side of the story.
  12. 12. Then Bata took out his knife and cut himself, and he fell to the ground. And Anpu believed him, andwas sick at heart. And he longed to be on the other side of the river, with his brother. Bata spoke again, "I must go to the valley of cedars, to be healed. And I shall hide my heart in a cedartree. And when the cedar tree is cut down, I will be in danger of dying. If your beer turns sour, you will knowthat I need your help. Come to the valley of cedars and search for my heart. Put my heart in a bowl of water.And I will come back to life again. Anpu promised to obey his brother, and went home. He killed his wife, and threw her body to thedogs. Bata traveled to the valley of cedars, and rested until his wound had healed. He hunted wild beastsand built a house for himself. And he hid his heart in the branches of a tree. One day, the nine gods were walking in the valley. And they saw that Bata was lonely. And Raordered Khnum to make a wife for Bata, on his potters wheel. And when the gods breathed life into her, theysaw that she was the most beautiful woman who ever lived. The seven Hathors gathered to declare her fate,and said that she would die a sudden death. Bata loved her. And he knew that whoever saw her would desire her. Every day, as he left to huntwild animals, he warned her, "Stay in the house, or the sea may try to carry you away. And there is little Icould do to save you." One day, when Bata had gone out to hunt, his wife grew bored and went out for a walk. And, as shestood beneath the tree, the sea saw her, and surged up the valley to get her. She tried to flee. But the treecaught her by the hair. She escaped, leaving a lock of her hair in the tree. The sea took the lock of hair, and carried it to Egypt, where the Nile took it. And the hair floated towhere the washermen of the King were washing the Kings clothes. And the sweet-smelling hair caused theKings clothes to smell like perfume. And the King complained of this. This happened every day. One day the overseer of the washermen saw the lock of hair caught in the reeds. He ordered that itbe brought to him. And he smelled its sweet smell. And he took the lock of hair to the King. And the Kings advisers said, "This is a lock of hair from adaughter of Ra." And the King wanted to make this woman his Queen. The King sent many messengers to all lands. All returned to say that they had failed to find thewoman. But one returned from the valley of the cedars to say that his companions had been killed by Bata,and that Batas wife was the woman that he sought. The King sent many soldiers to fetch Batas wife. And with the soldiers, he sent a woman to givejewels to Batas wife, and to tell her that the King wanted to make her a queen. Batas wife told this womanthat Batas heart was hidden in the tree, and that if the tree were cut down, Bata would die. And the soldierscut down the tree. As the tree fell, Bata fell down dead. And the soldiers chopped up the tree and dispersedthe pieces. At the same moment that Bata died, Anpus beer began to bubble and turn sour. And heimmediately put on his sandals, and grabbed his spear and his staff, and hastened to the valley of cedars. There he found his brother dead, and he wept. But he remembered his brothers instruction andsearched for his heart. He searched in vain for three years. And he longed to return to Egypt. At the beginningof the fourth year, he said to himself, "If I dont find my brothers heart tomorrow, I will go back home." The next day, he searched again. And near the end of the day, he found what he thought was a seed.But it was Batas dried up heart. And he put it in a bowl of water, and sat down to wait. The heart grew as itabsorbed water. Bata came back to life, but was very weak. Then Anpu held the bowl to Batas lips, and heswallowed the remaining water, and then swallowed his own heart. And his strength returned to him. Andthe two brothers embraced. Bata said, "Tomorrow, I will change myself into a sacred bull. And you will ride me back to Egypt.Lead me before the King. And he will reward you. Then return to your house."
  13. 13. The next day, Bata changed into a bull. And Anpu rode him to Egypt, and led him before the King.The King rewarded Anpu with gold, and silver, and land, and slaves. And there was rejoicing throughout theland. And Anpu returned to his house. Eventually, Bata encountered his wife, who was now the Queen. And he said, "Look upon me, for Iam alive." She asked, "And who are you?" He replied, "I am Bata. And it was you who caused the tree to be cut down, so that I would bedestroyed. But I am alive." And she trembled in fear, and left the room. That evening, the King sat at a feast, with his Queen. And she said to him, "Will you swear by thegods that you will give me anything that I want?" The King promised that he would. The Queen said, "I desireto eat the liver of the sacred bull, for he is nothing to you." The king was upset at her request. But the next day, he commanded that the bull be sacrificed. Andthe bull was sacrificed. And its blood splattered on each side the gate of the palace. That night, two persea trees sprang up next to the palace gate. The King was told of this miracle, andthere was much rejoicing. One day the King and Queen were standing in the shade of one of the trees. And the tree spoke tothe Queen, "False woman, you are the one who caused the cedar tree to be cut down, and you made theKing slaughter the bull. But, I am Bata, I am still alive." And the Queen was afraid. Later, when the King and Queen were feasting, the Queen said, "Will you swear by the gods that youwill give me anything that I want?" The King promised that he would. The Queen said, "It is my desire thatthose two persea trees be chopped down, to make furniture for me." The King was troubled by her request. But the next day the King and Queen watched as the treeswere cut down. As the Queen stood watching, a chip of wood flew from one of the trees, and flew into hermouth, and she swallowed it. And it made the Queen become pregnant. After many days, the Queen gave birth to a son. The King loved him, and made him heir to thethrone. In time the King died, and rejoined the gods. And his son succeeded him as King. The new King (who was Bata) summoned his court, and told everyone the story of his life. And hejudged that his wife, who had become his mother, should die for her crimes. And the court agreed. And shewas led away to be killed. Bata ruled Egypt for thirty years. Then he died. And his brother Anpu then ruled Egypt. The Lady Chang By Marjorie Clark When the Lady Chang arrived in the city of Canton, she possessed nothing in the world but theclothes she was wearing, the jewels on her fingers, and most precious of all, her little son, Ko. Everything else– her husband, her fine home and all her servants, even the village in which she lived – had been washedaway and lost forever in the great flood that had swept down upon them so suddenly. She found a house which costs very little, for it was in a poor part of the city, near the rubbishdumps. Every morning the carts rumbled by, taking all the city rubbish to be burned and buried. “I am lucky to have this small house,” the Lady Chang told herself. “I can clean my house in themorning: I can play, with my dear son, Ko, each afternoon; and in the evening, when he is asleep, I can weave
  14. 14. and embroider. The cloth I make will sell easily, and so I shall be able to feed and clothe both Ko and myself.”“Little Ko grew fast and was a great joy to her. “What are you doing, my son?” asked his mother one day, as she turned from her weaving to catchhim at play. “I am the butcher, Mother,” laughed Ko. “I am working in the market. See how cleverly I kill thisgoat, and how I cut it up for customers.” And he raised his voice and shouted harshly as he had heard thebutcher shouting each day in the market place. The Lady Chang sighed. “Indeed, my son learns quickly. He should not be here to copy the ways ofrough men. He should be learning to be a scholar as his father was.” She searched the city and found a housenear the university. “To live here will cost a great deal,” she thought. But she did not hesitate for long. She left theirhouse near the market and sold her last ring of pearl and silver, and soon she and her son were living in theirnew house. Now indeed, life was hard for the Lady Chang. In order to live and pay for Ko’s schooling, she had torise at dawn each day. She would clean her house, do the cooking, wash the clothes, and then work hard ather weaving until far into the night. Ko learned quickly, and the Lady Chang often smiled as she wove thebright threads and watched the cloth growing beneath her busy fingers. “Ko will be a learned man,” she toldherself proudly. “Already his teachers speak highly of him. He works so well that I care not that I must sit hereweaving all day long.” She threaded her loom with fine threads and began to weave a lovely pattern of gold and silver andscarlet. Each day when Ko returned from his studies, he admired his mother’s work. “This is the mostbeautiful piece of cloth you have ever woven, Mother, he said one day. “Surely you will strain your eyes withsuch fine work.” “Ah, my son,” she laughed, “this is to pay for you to be a wise and great man. My eyes are apoor price to pay for that.” By this time Ko had grown to be a fine, tall lad. So easily and so well had helearned his lessons that he began to grow proud and vain. “I know as much as any of the professors who tryto teach me,” he said scornfully. “That is boastful talk,” the Lady Chang reproved him. “You should learn humility as well asknowledge from books, my son. You still have much to learn, I fear.” A little later, however, Ko came home one day and threw his books on the table. “I have finishedwith schooling,” he said defiantly. “I am tired of learning. I know quite enough to earn my living.” “Do not stop!” cried the Lady Chang. “You will be a wise and great man like your father, if you wouldonly complete your studies.“No, Mother,” declared Ko. “I mean what I say. I have finished with Learning.” The Lady Chang did not argue with him. She reached across the table and got a sharp knife that laythere. Then, without a word, she slashed her weaving from the loom. The cloth fell, its gold and silver andscarlet in a tangled unfinished heap at her feet. “Mother!” cried Ko in horror, “what have you done? All your hard work is wasted! If you had workeda little longer, this would have been a perfect piece of cloth. Now it is nothing but a half-finished rag.” The Lady Chang looked at her son with grave eyes. “Son, you could have been a wise and great man,”she told him. “Now you will be little more than a peasant who toils in the fields or labors in the marketplace.” Ko’s cheeks grew red as he looked again at his mother’s lovely work, ruined and unfinished. Then, hepicked up his books. “I have learned a lesson, Mother,” he said in a low voice. “I will finish my studies. They’llnot be wasted. I may never be a great man, but I will try to be a wise one.”
  15. 15. The Lady Chang’s heart was filled with joy as she watched Ko return to his studies. She drew her seatclose to the loom and began to pick up the threads once more. Many, many hours of hard work lay beforeher, but that which she had already done would not be wasted. Ko indeed became a wise man, and greatone. He was famous through all the land of China. And now, when Chinese children are told tales of brave people in their country’s history, they listento the story of the Lady Chang, who was not afraid to ruin her most perfect work in order to teach a lesson toher son. The Chinese Cinderella A long, long time ago, there was a cave chief named Wu in south coast of China. He married twowives. Unfortunately, one of them died after giving birth to a baby girl. After growing into a young lady, thegirl was extremely beautiful and had a remarkable gift for embroidery and spinning. Chief Wu liked her verymuch and named her Ye Xian. Before long, Chief Wu died too leaving Ye Xian to be reared by her stepmother.The mean woman did not like Ye Xian for she was prettier and smarter than her own daughter so she treatedher poorly. Apart from giving her the worst jobs like collecting firewood and drawing water, she and herdaughter often mock at her, while Ye Xian always silently did her work without any complaint. One day, while drawing water, Ye Xian found a lovely little fish with big golden eyes and red fins. Sheloved it so much that she took it home and put it into a big bowl. Though the young lady had little food forherself, she was willing to share with the fish. Under her care, the small fish grew up every day, soon beingtoo big for a bowl. Ye Xian had to move it to a pond nearby. Each time she approached to the pond, the fishwould come out of the water onto the bank to greet her. It became her only friend companying her in herhard time. Her stepmother heard about the fish. Angry that Ye Xian had found happiness, she planned to kill thefish. She followed Ye Xian to the pond and saw the fish from the distance. But as long as she came onto thebank, the fish immediately sank into the deep water. So the next day, the malicious woman made Ye Xian gocarry water from a new place far away from their house, and then she put on her step daughters clothes andimitate her voice to call the fish. Unaware of this deadly trap, the innocent creature floated up to greet itsfriend as usual. When it clearly saw the dagger in the bad womans hand, it was too late. Ye Xians step mother cruelly killed the fish on the bank, cooked its flesh and deeply buried its boneswith rubbish. Ye Xian was distraught when she learned of the fish’s death. But she could do nothing but cryon the bank. As she was mourning for her friend, an old man wearing the coarsest of clothes and with hairhanging down over his shoulders flew down from the sky and landed by her side. "Dont cry", he said, "I know where the fish bones were buried. You go there, dig them out, keepthem secretly. When you are in bad need, you could pray to the bones which would give you what you want.But memorize, dont be greedy, otherwise, you will be punished by the God." Then, the old man leaded YeXian to a abandoned cellar, disappearing. Ye Xian retrieved her friends remains there and hid them in a safe place. Remembering the warningof the old man, Ye Xian rarely used the magic bones until Cave Festival which was an important local festivalwhen the young people gathered in the village to meet one another and to find husbands and wives. Everyyoung girl was keen on going to the festival in beautiful dress. Ye Xian was not an exception, but she knewthat her stepmother would not allow it because she feared that someone would pick Ye Xian rather than herown daughter, which meant she would lose her half property to pay her step daughters dower. Moreover,Ye Xian did not have any decent clothes. After the stepmother and her daughter left for the festival, desperate Ye Xian asked the bones forclothes to wear to the festival. Suddenly she was wearing a sumptuous gown of kingfisher feathers. On her
  16. 16. feet were a pair of shining golden shoes which were magically lighter than a feather and did not make anynoise while touching stone floor. Ye Xian arrived at the festival and soon all were looking her way. Attracted by her charm, young mencircled her dancing and singing; shocked by her beauty, young ladies looked at her from the distance withenvy complaining the stranger stole their thunder. Ye Xians step sister was one of them. After a whilestaring, she screamed to her mother: "Look! Mom, she just looks like my sister!" They both started movingtowards Ye Xian to have a clearer look. At the same time, Ye Xian too recognized them in the crowd. Seeingthat she would be found out, Ye Xian dashed out of the festival leaving behind one of the golden shoes. On reaching home she quickly change back into her rags and pretended to be sleeping under a treein the yard. When her step mother and sister came back, they found nothing unusual. Ye Xians lost shoe was found by a merchant and a few months later sold to the king of Tuo Han, astrong kingdom of tens of islands, covering thousands of miles. Fascinated by the delicate ladies shoe, the young king could not resisted yearning for its owner. Heordered his ministers to travel round the kingdom with the shoe and bring back any lady who could fit in it.But no one was found, because the shoe could magically change its size. No matter how tiny a girls foot was,the shoe was always a inch shorter than it. The eager king called in the merchant again for inquiring of thespot where the shoe was found, only to know it was somewhere near a mountain in mainland. The king himself sailed off to the mountain right away. To his disappointed, it was a remote and poorarea. He could not believe that the owner of the golden shoe could live there. But he still had his men searchevery house of the neighboring villages for the other shoe. Finally, they found it and the gown that Ye Xianhad worn to the festival in her bed-drawer. Ye Xian was taken to the king. Pretty as she was, the king yet doubted that the village girl in ragswould be the one he had been longing for day and night. So he asked her to try on the shoes and clothes.After a while, from the shabby cottage was walking out a lady beautiful like a fairy. A charming smile wasshining on her angelic face, the splendid gown was wrapping her appealing body, and the golden shoes werethe perfect fitting for her feet. At the moment, the king realized that she was the one for him. The step mother and sister begged for forgiveness, and Ye Xian forgave them for their cruelties. Theking took Ye Xian back to his kingdom where they married and lived happily ever after. Creating the Earth A Yoruba Tale from West Africa The entire world was filled with water when God decided to create the world. God sent hismessenger Obatala to perform the task of creating the world. Obatala brought along his helper, a mannamed Oduduwa as well as a calabash full of earth and a chicken. Then they began their descent to earthfrom a rope. Along the way, they stopped over at a feast where Obatala got drunk from drinking too much palmwine. Oduduwa, finding his master drunk, picked up the calabash and the chicken and continued on thejourney. When Oduduwa reached the earth, he sprinkled earth from the calabash over the water and hedropped the chicken on the earth. The chicken then ran around spreading the earth in every direction hemoved until there was land. Oduduwa had now created earth from what used to be water. Later when Obatala got out of his drunken haze, he discovered that Oduduwa had alreadyperformed his task and he was very upset. God however gave him another task to perform – to create thepeople that would populate the earth.
  17. 17. And that was how the world was created in a place now called Ile-Ife. The Forbidden Fruit An Efe Tale God created the first human being Ba-atsi with the help of the moon. He kneaded the body intoshape, covered it with a skin, and poured in blood. When the man had thus been given life, God whispered inhis ear that her, Ba-atsi, should beget children, and upon them he should impress the following prohibition:“Of all the trees of the forest you may eat, but of the Tahu tree you may not eat.” Ba-atsi had many children,impressed upon them the prohibition, and then retired to heaven. At first, men respected thecommandment they had been given, and lived happily. But one day, a pregnant woman was seized with anirresistible desire to eat of the forbidden fruit. She tried to persuade her husband to give her some of it. Atfirst, he refused, but after a time he gave way. He stole into the woods, picked a Tahu fruit, peeled it, and hidthe peel among the leaves. But the moon had seen his action and reported it to God. God was so enragedover man’s disobedience that as punishment, he sent death among them. God Leaves the World An African Folk Tale The Mende people of Sierra Leone say that God made everything, heaven and earth, and animals,and last of all he made men and women. He told them that they could have whatever they wanted if theyasked him. So when men were in need they demanded this or that, and God always gave it to them. Butmen came so often that they thought God’s name must be just “Take It!” which he said when they asked himfor anything. God grew tired of people troubling him so often, and saw that they would wear him out withtheir demands. He decided to make himself a dwelling-place far away and above men. While men slept, Godwent away and when they woke up, they could not find him. But then, they looked up and saw God spreadout in all directions, and they said that God was great. God said farewell to men, but warned them not to doevil to one another, for he had made men to live in agreement. Then he went up on high, and men began tocal him “High.” God also gave me and women a fowl each, so that they might sacrifice to him if they didwrong to one another. So men still sacrifice and call on God to come down when they offer him a fowl inreparation for wrongdoing. The Gentlemen of the Jungle An African Folk Tale Told by Jomo Kenyatta Once upon a time an elephant made a friendship with a man. One day a heavy thunderstorm brokeout. The elephant went to his friend and said to him: “My dear good man, will you please let me put mytrunk inside your hut to keep it out of this torrential rain?” The man replied: “My dear good elephant, my
  18. 18. hut is very small, but there is room for your trunk and myself.” But what followed? As soon as the elephantput his trunk inside the hut, slowly he pushed his head inside, and finally flung the man out in the rain. The man started to grumble; the animals heard the noise and came to see what was the matter. Inthis turmoil the lion came along roaring, and said in a loud voice: “Don’t you all know that I am the King ofthe Jungle! I command my ministers to appoint a Commission of Enquiry to go thoroughly into this matterand report accordingly.” The elephant, obeying the command of his master, got busy with the other ministers to appoint theCommission of Enquiry. On see the personnel, the man protested and asked if it was not necessary toinclude in this Commission a member from his side. But he was told that it was impossible, since no one fromhis side who was well enough educated to understand the intricacy of jungle law. The Commission sat to take the evidence. The Rt. Hon. Mr. Elephant was first called. He came alongwith a superior air and said: “Gentlemen of the Jungle, I have always regarded it as my duty to protect theinterests of my friends. He invited me to save his hut from being blown away by a hurricane. As thehurricane had gained access owing to the unoccupied space in the hut, I considered it necessary, in myfriend’s own interests, to turn the undeveloped space to a more economic used by sitting myself in it. After hearing the Rt. Hon. Mr. Elephant’s conclusive evidence, the Commission then called the man,who began to give his own account of the dispute. But the Commission cut him short, saying “My good man,please confine yourself to relevant issues. All we wish you to tell us is whether the undeveloped space inyour hut was occupied by anyone else before Mr. Elephant assumed his position. The man began to say:“No, but—“. But at this point the Commission declared that they had heard sufficient evidence from bothsides. After enjoying a delicious meal at the expense of the Rt. Hon. Mr. Elephant, they reached their verdict.“In our opinion, this dispute has arisen through a regrettable misunderstanding due to the backwardness ofyour ideas. We consider that Mr. Elephant has fulfilled his sacred duty of protecting your interests. As it isclearly for your good that the space should be put to its most economic use, and as you yourself have notreached the stage of expansion which would enable you to fill it, Mr. Elephant s hall continue his occupationof your hut, but we give you permission to look for a site where you can build another hut more suited toyour needs. The man, having no alternative, and fearing that his refusal might expose him to the teeth and clawsof members of the commission, did as they suggested. But no sooner had he built another hut than Mr.Rhinoceros charged in with his horn lowered and ordered the man to quit. This procedure was repeated untilMr. Buffalo, Mr. Leopard, and Mr. Hyena and the rest were all accommodated with new huts. Then the mandecided that he must adopt an effective method of protection, since Commissions of Enquiry did not seem tobe of any use to him. He sat down and said” Ng’ enda thi ndagaga motegi,” which literally means “there isnothing that treads on the earth that cannot be trapped,” or in other words, you can fool people for a time,but not forever. Early one morning, he went out and built a bigger and better hut a little distance away. No soonerhad Mr. Rhinoceros seen it that he came rushing in, only to find Mr. Elephant was already inside, soundasleep. Mr. Leopard next came to the window, Mr. Lion, Mr. Fox and Mr. Buffalo entered the doors, whileMr. Hyena howled for a place in the shade and Mr. Alligator basked on the roof. Presently the all begandisputing about their rights of penetration, and while they were all embroiled together the man set the huton fire and burnt it to the ground, jungle lords and all. Then he went home, saying “Peace is costly, but it’sworth the expense,” and lived happily ever after.
  19. 19. The SecondQuarter: Drama
  20. 20. The Calabashi Kids A Tale from TanzaniaNARRATOR 1: Once there was a woman named Shindo, who lived in a village at the foot of a snow-capped mountain.NARRATOR 4: Her husband had died, and she had no children, so she was very lonely.NARRATOR 2: And she was always tired too, for she had no one to help with the chores.NARRATOR 3: All on her own, sheNARRATOR 1: cleaned the hut,NARRATOR 4: cleaned the yard,NARRATOR 2: tended the chickens,NARRATOR 3: washed her clothes in the river,NARRATOR 1: carried water,NARRATOR 4: cut firewood,NARRATOR 2: and cooked her solitary meals.NARRATOR 3: At the end of each day, Shindo gazed up at the snowy peak and prayed.SHINDO: Great Mountain Spirit! My work is too hard. Send me help!NARRATOR 1: One day, Shindo was weeding her small field by the river, where she grew vegetables and bananas and gourds. Suddenly, a noble chieftain appeared beside her.CHIEFTAIN: I am a messenger from the Great Mountain Spirit.NARRATOR 4: He handed the astonished woman some gourd seeds.CHIEFTAIN: Plant these carefully. They are the answer to your prayers.NARRATOR 2: Then the chieftain vanished.SHINDO: (skeptically, looking at the seeds in her hand) What help could I get from a handful of seeds?NARRATOR 3: Still, she planted and tended them as carefully as she could.NARRATOR 1: Shindo was amazed at how quickly the seeds grew. In just a week, long vines trailed over the ground, and ripe gourds hung from them.NARRATOR 4: Shindo brought the gourds home, sliced off the tops, and scooped out the pulp. Then she laid the gourds on the rafters of her hut to dry.NARRATOR 2: When they hardened, she could sell them at the market as calabashes, to be made into bowls and jugs.NARRATOR 3: One fine gourd Shindo set by the cook fire. This one she wanted to use herself, and she hoped it would dry faster.NARRATOR 1: The next morning, Shindo went off again to tend her field.NARRATOR 4: But meanwhile, back in the hut,NARRATOR 2: the gourds began to change.NARRATOR 3: They sprouted heads,NARRATOR 1: then arms,NARRATOR 4: then legs.NARRATOR 2: Soon they were not gourds at all.NARRATOR 3: They were—
  21. 21. ALL NARRATORS: children!NARRATOR 1: One boy lay by the fire, where Shindo had put the fine gourd.NARRATOR 4: The other children called to him from the rafters.CHILDREN: Ki-te-te, come help us! We’ll work for our mother. Come help us, Ki-te-te, Our favorite brother!NARRATOR 2: Kitete helped his brothers and sisters down from the rafters.NARRATOR 3: Then the children started quickly on the chores.CHILD 1: Clean the hut!CHILD 2: Clean the yard!CHILD 3: Feed the chickens!CHILD 4: Wash the clothes!CHILD 5: Carry water!CHILD 6: Cut the wood!CHILD 7: Cook the meal!NARRATOR 1: All joined in but Kitete.NARRATOR 4: Drying by the fire had made the boy slow-witted. So he just sat there, smiling widely.NARRATOR 2: When the work was done, Kitete helped the others climb back on the rafters.NARRATOR 3: Then they all turned again into gourds.NARRATOR 1: That afternoon, as Shindo returned home, the other women of the village called to her.WOMAN 1: Who were those children in your yard today?WOMAN 2: Where did they come from?WOMAN 3: Why were they doing your chores?SHINDO: (angrily) What children? Are you all making fun of me?NARRATOR 4: But when she reached her hut, she was astounded.NARRATOR 2: The work was done, and even her meal was ready!NARRATOR 3: She could not imagine who had helped her.NARRATOR 1: The same thing happened the next day. As soon as Shindo had gone off, the gourds turned into children,NARRATOR 4: with headsNARRATOR 2: and armsNARRATOR 3: and legs.NARRATOR 1: The ones on the rafters called out,CHILDREN: Ki-te-te, come help us! We’ll work for our mother. Come help us, Ki-te-te, Our favorite brother!NARRATOR 4: Kitete helped them down, and they did all the chores.CHILD 1: Clean the hut!CHILD 2: Clean the yard!CHILD 3: Feed the chickens!CHILD 4: Wash the clothes!CHILD 5: Carry water!CHILD 6: Cut the wood!
  22. 22. CHILD 7: Cook the meal!NARRATOR 2: Then they climbed back to the rafters, and turned again into gourds.NARRATOR 3: Once more, Shindo came home and was amazed to see the work all done. But this time, she decided to find out who were her helpers.NARRATOR 1: The next morning, Shindo pretended to leave, but she hid beside the door of the hut and peeked in. And so she saw the gourds turn into children,NARRATOR 4: with headsNARRATOR 2: and armsNARRATOR 3: and legs.NARRATOR 1: And she heard the ones on the rafters call out,CHILDREN: Ki-te-te, come help us! We’ll work for our mother. Come help us, Ki-te-te, Our favorite brother!NARRATOR 4: Kitete helped them down. As the children rushed out the door, they nearly ran into Shindo.NARRATOR 2: She was too astonished to speak, and so were the children. But after a moment, they went on with their chores.CHILD 1: Clean the hut!CHILD 2: Clean the yard!CHILD 3: Feed the chickens!CHILD 4: Wash the clothes!CHILD 5: Carry water!CHILD 6: Cut the wood!CHILD 7: Cook the meal!NARRATOR 3: When they were done, they started to climb back to the rafters.SHINDO: (urgently) No, no! You must not change back into gourds! You will be the children I never had, and I will love you and care for you! ***NARRATOR 1: So Shindo kept the children as her own.NARRATOR 4: She was no longer lonely.NARRATOR 2: And the children were so helpful, she soon became rich, with many fields of vegetables and bananas, and flocks of sheep and goats.NARRATOR 3: That is, all were helpful but Kitete, who stayed by the fire with his simple-minded smile.NARRATOR 1: Most of the time, Shindo didn’t mind.NARRATOR 4: In fact, Kitete was really her favorite, because he was like a sweet baby.NARRATOR 2: But sometimes, when she was tired or unhappy about something else, she would get annoyed and yell at him.SHINDO: You useless child! Why can’t you be smart like your brothers and sisters, and work as hard as they do?NARRATOR 3: Kitete would only grin back at her.NARRATOR 1: One day, Shindo was out in the yard, cutting vegetables for a stew. As she carried the pot from the bright sunlight into the hut, she tripped over Kitete.NARRATOR 4: She fell, and the clay pot shattered. Vegetables and water streamed everywhere.
  23. 23. SHINDO: (getting up, screaming at him) Stupid boy! Haven’t I told you to stay out of my way? (derisively) But what can I expect? You’re not a real child at all. You’re nothing but a calabash!NARRATOR 2: The very next moment, Kitete was no longer there.NARRATOR 3: In his place was a gourd.SHINDO: (shrieking) What have I done? I didn’t mean what I said! You’re not a calabash, you’re my own darling son!NARRATOR 1: The other children came crowding into the hut.SHINDO: Oh, children, please do something!NARRATOR 4: They looked at each other a moment.NARRATOR 2: Then over each other they climbed, scampering up to the rafters.NARRATOR 3: When the last child had been helped up by Shindo, they called out one last time,CHILDREN: Ki-te-te, come help us! We’ll work for our mother. Come help us, Ki-te-te, OUR FAVORITE BROTHER!NARRATOR 1: For a long moment, nothing happened.NARRATOR 4: Then slowly,NARRATOR 2: the gourd began to change.NARRATOR 3: It sprouted a head,NARRATOR 1: then arms,NARRATOR 4: then legs.NARRATOR 2: At last, it was not a gourd at all.NARRATOR 3: It was—SHINDO & CHILDREN: (shouting happily, as SHINDO hugs him) KITETE! **NARRATOR 1: Shindo learned her lesson.NARRATOR 4: Ever after, she was very careful what she called her children.NARRATOR 2: And so they gave her comfort and happiness,NARRATOR 3: all the rest of her days. Ramayana It starts in Ayodhya, the jewel among cities. Within this city nobody was hungry, nobody was poor,every woman was faithful to her husband, everybody knew their role in society, everybody was learned inthe Vedas, and everybody was happy. And so, at this point, the heroic adventures of Rama truly began. However, one person in Ayodhya was not happy. It was the king, Dasaratha, and he lamented hislack of sons to carry on the royal line. He presented his problem to the royal sages, and one had an idea.“We must, King Dasaratha, perform a horse sacrifice as prescribed in the Vedas, and if it pleases the gods,they may grant you sons.” The king was pleased with this idea, and ordered the preparation to begin at once. At the same time, the gods were discussing Ravana, the vile, disgusting demon king with 10 headsand 20 arms. Ravana was terrorizing the sages and ascetics by having his minions disrupt the sacrifices, and
  24. 24. destroy the peace and quiet the holy men needed to have in order to meditate. The gods could not killRavana because a long time ago, Brahma had granted him a boon. This boon protected Ravana from all gods,demons, celestial beings, and the like. However, because Ravana believed that no monkey or human couldkill him, he did not ask for protection from the beings of the human or animal world. So to remove this thornfrom the gods’ sides, Vishnu, the protector of the universe decided to be reborn a human. Back on earth, Dasaratha was performing his horse sacrifice. He was chopping up a perfectly whitehorse with three knives, and with the greatest care, threw the piece into the fire. As heput the last piece inthe fire, a celestial being in white robes appeared. The being, in a mellow and throaty voice, spoke thesewords: “King Dasaratha, the gods are pleased with your fine sacrifice. In order to honor your wishes, here issome sacred porridge.” The divine creature handed Dasaratha a bowl with a thick, white substance inside.Then, when the king had returned his attention to the god-like being, it uttered these instructions: “You mustgive this divine drink to your wives, and then, they in turn will produce sons.” The king was overjoyed at thisnews and hurried to give the porridge to his wives. The great king divided the porridge among his three major wives, and to them four sons were born.Rama was the eldest and was born to Kausalya; Bharata was born to Kaikeyi; and Lakshmana and Satrughnawere born to Sumitra. They all excelled in the art of war, were taught politics and history, and were welllearned in the Vedas. When Rama was barely a teenager, the great sage Visvamitra visited the court andmade a demand of the king. “King Dasaratha, I intend to take your eldest son, Rama to the forest in order tokill the demons that are harassing us.” Rama was the king’s favourite son, and the king tried to bargain withthe holy man, but it was to no avail. Because Rama and Lakshmana could not bear to be separated, theyboth immediately left for the forest. Once inside the forest, Visvamitra took them to Tataka, the terrible demoness. She was hideous inform, and enormous. Around her neck was a human skull. She threw enormous rocks at them whilehovering above them and changing shapes. “We must not kill her,” instructed Rama, “for she is a woman,and it would not be right to slay a woman.” But Tataka would not give up, and so Lakshmana pierced herheart with a single arrow, and the gods praised them. When the threesome had returned to the sage’s ashram, Visvamitra spoke in his deep, unwaveringvoice, “You have done well, sons of Dasaratha. As a reward for your valor I present you with these weapons.”And he gave Rama and Lakshmana supernatural weapons, with amazing powers, and all a beautiful goldcolor. There was a quiver with an unlimited amount of arrows, arrows that could destroy entire armies, andbows that were so extremely powerful; one couldn’t begin to contemplate their power and strength. Now that they had these weapons with an infinite amount of power, Visvamitra enlightened Ramaand his brother on their text task: “You must stand vigilant, guarding a sacrifice from demonsfor six days andseven nights.” So the brothers watched over the sacrifice the sages were performing, and guarded it. Butthere were not demons. Then, suddenly on the sixth day, which was the most important part of the ritual,hundreds of demons swooped down, flinging dead flesh and spitting blood. Lakshmana and Rama took aim,and whoosh, let the arrows fly. Every arrow found its mark and before long, every single demon had beenutterly destroyed. With the grisly task finished, the brother and the sage left the forest to go to the city of Mithila. Theking of the city was in possession of a mighty bow, and the Bow of Shiva, which was left in the city many eonsago. The king also had a daughter named Sita. Sita was born of mother earth and has all the qualities of aperfect woman and wife. She was fair, beautiful, kind, loving, and had a heart of gold. In order to win Sita’shand in marriage, a prince or king had to lift the great bow of Shiva and string it, but nobody could do it.After witnessing everybody’s failure, Lakshmana convinced Rama to try his luck. As Rama approached thebow, a light seemed to shimmer from him. He grasped the great bow with one hand, easily lifted it up andstrung it. But when he tried to draw the bow, it broke with the sound like a thunderclap. In fact, the soundwas so loud that all but the strongest men were knocked senseless by it. And to Rama’s boundless delight,Sita stepped forward and put a garland of lotuses around his neck, which we all know means that sheaccepted his marriage proposal.
  25. 25. They returned to Ayodhya, and got married. King Dasaratha realized that he was growing old anddecided to give up the reign to his favourite and oldest son, Rama. The people of the city rejoiced when theyheard the news, for hey all loved Rama, too. But the maidservant to Kaikeyi, Manthara, convinced Kaikeyithat she would be better off if her son, Bharata, was king. So Kaikeyi approached Dasaratha and said thesehateful words: “My husband, remember when I saved your life in the battlefield so many years ago? And doyou remember that you granted me two boons at that time? The time has come for you to fulfil yourpromise! I want Rama exiled for 14 years and forced to live like an ascetic, and Bharata to be made king!”Dasaratha replied in anguish to her venomous words, “Oh woman, have you no heart? Please ask anythingbut that.” But she would not give in and the king was forced to honor his promise. When Rama heard thenews, he wished to honor his father’s wishes, so he departed to the forest immediately, accompanied by hisever faithful brother, Lakshmana, and his new wife, Sita. Bharata was in his uncle’s court when the news of the kingship and Rama’s exile reached him. Whenhe returned to Ayodhya he found out that his father, King Dasaratha, had died of a broken heart. He refusedto profit from his mother’s evil scheming, and departed immediately to the forest with a huge army, and aniron resolve to restore his brother to the throne. When Lakshmana, heard the thundering of a thousand hooves, a million footmen, and saw the flagof Ayodhya, he tried to convince Rama that Bharata was here to kill them, and that they needed to destroythe army. But Rama calmed him down, and decided to talk to Bharata. As Rama and Bharata met, theyhugged each other and Bharata made his plea. “My dear brother, won’t you come back to Ayodhya to rule?The people need you.” But Rama intended to honor his father’s boons and told Bharata that he needed tostay in the forest. So Bharata took Rama’s sandals, put them on the throne, and vowed not to go intoAyodhya until Rama returned. Bharata then ruled in Rama’s name in a small town outside to Ayodhya. And so Rama and his faithful family members walked through the beautiful forest called Dandaka.They found a pleasant spot that had lots of game by a stream. They built a hut and lived happily for tenpeaceful years. One day Supernaka, the terrible demoness, was travelling through the forest when she saw Rama.She looked at his handsome body and thought, “I would like to have that man for my husband.” So shechanged herself into a beautiful lady and tried to seduce Rama. But Rama could see through the guise, andso he brought her to Lakshmana. Lakshmana was so furious at the idea of his brother marrying a demonessthat with three swift arrows he promptly cut off Supernaka’s ears and nose. This terrible demon woman, so terrible to behold, ran to her brother Ravana, the King of Lanka.When he had heard her plight he grew outraged, and sent an army of 14,000 rakshasas to destroy Rama.Furthermore, Supernaka told Ravana of Sita’s exquisite beauty and at once the king of the demons desiredher to be his wife. Meanwhile, the army of demons had approached the place where Rama, Lakshmana and Sita wereliving. Rama and Lakshmana were ready for the onslaught, bows in hand. The demons attacked! The air wasfilled with whistling arrows and terrible cries. But finally, Rama had slaughtered every rakshasa and Ravanahad sent. True to his wish, and following his desiresinstead of his brain, all his rakshasas will do, Ravana set outwith his Uncle Marica to capture Sita. He had Marica change himself into a golden deer. As Ravanaexpected, the deer caught Sita’s fancy and she aske Rama to capture it. Rama willingly obliged his wife, butnot until giving firm instructions to Lakshmana to guard Sita. As Rama got closer to the deer, he saw it was ademon, and right before Rama killed it, the deer uttered these words in Rama’s voice, “Sita, help me!” WhenLakshmana and sita heard these words, Sita convinced Lakshmana to go help Rama. But first he drew a circlearound the hut that would protect Sita and told her to stay within it. As Rama and Ravana met, a light seemed to be shining on Rama, while the clouds darkened aboutRavana’s head. Ravana charged, but Rama parried and thrust back with his sword. They fought, long andhard, for many hours, until Rama, using his divine bow, pierced Ravana’s heart. The monkeys, at the sametime, defeated the rakshasa army. Rama and his troops gave Ravana a proper burial, for as Rama so wiselyput it, “Hostility ends at death.”
  26. 26. Sita’s purity was in doubt by the people, because she had been in the house of another man. Toprove her purity she walked into a burning pyre. Her loyalty to Rama was revealed, as she survivedunscathed. Lakshmana and Site returned to Ayodhya where Rama was crowned king and he ruled in peacefor many thousands of years. Oli Impan, An Excerpt By Alberto S. Florentino After the liberation of Manila, hundreds of indigent families settled in the squalid, cramped space ofthe bombed ruins of an old government building of Juan Luna. For more than a decade these “squatters”tenaciously refused to move out in spite of court rulings. The “casbah”, as the compound was popularlyknown, became a breeding place for vice and corruption. The city government was able to evict the“squatters” only on December 20, 1958 – five days before Christmas. (On the middle of the stage, extending from side to side, is a stone wall one and a half feet high. At left may be seen a portion of a tall edifice. At right, is a portion of the “casbah”. Beyond the stone wall, an estero (unseen) – and the sky. A five-year-old girl sits on the stone wall, her thin legs dangling in the air. Offstage there is a continuous commotion of evacuation. A woman’s voice rises above the commotion as shereprimands a child for getting in her way. A six-year-old boy appears on stage walking backwards – away from his mother, nagging offstage. The mother quiets down. The boy turns around and plays with his toy: an empty milk can pulled along the ground with a piece of string.)Girl: Is there a fire?Boy: (Stops playing and faces her) Huh?Girl: I said, is there a fire?Boy: There is no fire. (Continues to play)Girl: (Looks toward the street. After a pause.) I think there is no fire.Boy: (Stops playing_ I told you there’s none.Girl: There is.Boy: How do you know? Do you see any smoke? Do you hear any fireman? (resumes his play. Runs around imitating a fire engine) EEEEEEEEEEEEEEE! I like it when there is a big fire!Girl: (Worried) If there is no fire, why are they putting these things out? (pints to a pile of household belongings nearby)Boy: Because we are being thrown out.Girl: Who told you?Boy: My mother.Girl: Who is throwing us out?Boy: (Sits on the other end of the stone wall) The government.Girl: What is a government?Boy: I don’t know.Girl: You didn’t ask your mother?Boy: I forgot to ask her.Girl: Why should the government throw us out?Boy: (Points to the compound) Because it owns this.
  27. 27. Girl: (Enraged) But this is ours!Boy: No, it is not ours.Girl: (Insistent) It is ours! It is!Boy: It is not!Girl: (A tiny scream) It is! It is!Boy: (Loud) How do you know it is ours?Girl: We’ve always been here, haven’t we?Boy: Yes, but that doesn’t mean it is ours.Girl: (After a pause) If they throw us out, we’ll have nowhere to go. How about you? You have any place to go?Boy: None. But we will have one. (Proudly) My mother has a job.Girl: She has?Boy: Yes!Girl: What does she do?Boy: She reads hands.Girl: She reads – hands? (Looking at her hands) Why does she read hands?Boy: So she can tell what will happen tomorrow.Girl: She can do that? By reading hands?Boy: Yes, She can!Girl: (Showing him her hands) Can she read my hands? I want to know where we will stay tomorrow.Boy: She can’t read your hands.Girl: (Looks at them) Why not?Boy: They are too small… and dirty.Girl: (She quickly withdraws them and quietly wipes them on her dress)Boy: Besides… she reads only men’s hands.Girl: Only men’s hands? Why?Boy: Because they are big.. and easy to read.Girl: How does she read hands? Like she reads the comics?Boy: I don’t know.Girl: You don’t know? Don’t you watch her?Boy: My mother won’t let me. She makes me go out and play. And she closes the door.Girl: She closes the door! How can she read in the dark?Boy: I don’t know. (Proudly) But she can!Girl: Don’t you ever peep?Boy: No, I don’t.Girl: Why not?Boy: She’ll beat me up. (Commotion offstage.)Girl: What’s that? What’s happening there?Boy: (Tries to see) I don’t know. I can’t see. (Pulls her) Come out, let’s take a look!Girl: (Resisting) I can’t.
  28. 28. Boy: Why not?Girl: My father told me to stay here. He said not to go anywhere.Boy: (Turning) Then I will go and take a look.Girl: (Frightened) No, don’t. Stay here. Don’t leave me.Boy: Why?Girl: I’m afraid.Boy: Afraid of what?Girl: I don’t know.Boy: But how can we find out what’s happening?Girl: Let’s not find out anymore.Boy: (Restless) But I want to see. (Scampers up the stone wall) I can see from here!Girl: What do you see?Boy: (Incredulous) They are destroying our homes. (Sound of wrecking crew at work)Girl: (frightened) Who are destroying them?Boy: The men with hammers!Girl: Nobody is stopping them?Boy: Nobody.Girl: But why? Are there no policemen?Boy: There are. There are many policemen.Girl: What are they doing? What are the policemen doing?Boy: Nothing.Girl: Nothing? They are not stopping the men?Boy: No.Girl: Why not?Boy: I don’t know. (Commotion. Shouts. Curses)Girl: (Alarmed) What’s happening now?Boy: (excited throughout) A man is trying to stop the men with hammers! Now the policemen are trying to stop him. They’re running after him. But the man fights like a mad dog! (A man shouts, cursing)Girl: (Suddenly, with terror in her voice). That’s my father! (In her fright she covers her eyes with hands)Boy: Your father?Girl: Yes, he’s my father! What are they doing to him? Are they hurting him?Boy: No, they are only trying to catch him… Now they’ve caught him! They are tying his hands!Girl: What will they do to him?Boy: I don’t know. Now they are putting him in a car. A police car.Girl: (Whimpers) Father… Father…Boy: They are taking him away! (A car with siren drivers away)Girl: (Screams) FATHER! FATHER!Boy: He can’t hear you now.Girl: (Starts to cry)Boy: (Walks to and sits beside her) Why are you crying? Don’t cry please!
  29. 29. Girl: They are going to hurt my father, aren’t they?Boy: No, they won’t hurt him.Girl: (Removes her hands from her eyes) How do you know?Boy: I just know it. (Suddenly) Come, let’s sing a song.Girl: I don’t know how to sing.Boy: I’ll teach you.Girl: How?Boy: I’ll sing… and you listen. (She nods and wipes her eyes dry)Boy: (Sings) Saylenay… Olinay… Oliskam… Olisbray… Ranyonberginmaderenchayle… Oli impansotenderenmayle… Slipinebenlipis… Slipinebenlipis…Girl: (Smiling) That’s a pretty song. Who taught you that song?Boy: (Proudly) My mother!Girl: What does it mean? I can’t understand it.Boy: It’s about God.Girl: What’s a “God”?Boy: I don’t know. I haven’t asked my mother. But she told me God was born in a stable.Girl: What’s a stable?Boy: A place for horses.Girl: (Incredulous) He was born there? In a place for horses? Why?Boy: My mother said he had nowhere to stay.Girl: Was he poor?Boy: I don’t know.Girl: (Suddenly) I like the song. Will you sing it again?Boy: No, let’s sing it together.Girl: I told you, I don’t know how.Boy: I’ll teach you. I’ll sing it a little… and you sing after me. (She smiles and nods)Boy: (Sings) Saylenay…Girl: Saylenay…Boy: Olinay…Girl: Olinay…Boy: Oliskam…Girl: Oliskam…Boy: Olisbray…Girl: Olisbray…Boy: Ranyonberginmaderenchayle…
  30. 30. Girl: Ranyon…(She giggles) I can’t say that!Boy: Let’s skip it. (Sings) Oli impan… n, skip that, too. (Sings) Slipinebenlipis…Girl: Slipinebenlipis…Boy: Slipinebenlipis…Girl: Slipinebenlipis… The Magic Brocade A Tale of ChinaNARRATOR 1: Once in China there lived an old widow and her son, Chen. The widow was known all over for the brocades that she made on her loom.NARRATOR 4: Weaving threads of silver, gold, and colored silk into her cloth, she made pictures of flowers, birds, and animals—NARRATOR 2: pictures so real they seemed almost alive.NARRATOR 3: People said there were no brocades finer than the ones the widow wove.NARRATOR 1: One day, the widow took a pile of brocades to the marketplace, where she quickly sold them. Then she went about buying her household needs.NARRATOR 4: All at once she stopped.WIDOW: Oh, my!NARRATOR 2: Her eye had been caught by a beautiful painted scroll that hung in one of the stalls.NARRATOR 3: It showed a marvelous palace, all red and yellow and blue and green, reaching delicately to the sky. All around were fantastic gardens, and walking through them, the loveliest maidens.NARRATOR 1: The stall keeper asked,STALL KEEPER: Do you like it? It’s a painting of Sun Palace. They say it lies far to the east and is the home of many fairy ladies.WIDOW: (sighs) It’s wonderful. It makes me want to be there. (pays and takes it)NARRATOR 4: Though it cost most of her money, the widow could not resist buying the scroll.NARRATOR 2: When she got back to her cottage, she showed it to her son.WIDOW: Look, Chen. Have you ever seen anything more beautiful? How I would love to live in that palace, or at least visit it!NARRATOR 3: Chen looked at her thoughtfully.CHEN: Mother, why don’t you weave the picture as a brocade? That would be almost like being there.WIDOW: Why, Chen, what a marvelous idea! I’ll start at once.NARRATOR 1: She set up her loom and began to weave.NARRATOR 4: She worked for hours, then days, then weeks, barely stopping to eat or sleep. Her eyes grew bloodshot, and her fingers raw.CHEN: (anxiously) Mother, shouldn’t you get more rest?WIDOW: Oh, Chen, it’s so hard to stop. While I weave, I feel like I’m there at Sun Palace. And I don’t want to come away!NARRATOR 2: Because the widow no longer wove brocades to sell, Chen cut firewood and sold that instead.
  31. 31. NARRATOR 3: Months went by, while inch by inch the pattern appeared on the loom.NARRATOR 1: One day, Chen came in to find the loom empty and the widow sobbing.CHEN: (in alarm) What’s wrong, Mother?NARRATOR 4: She looked at him tearfully.WIDOW: (plaintively) I finished it.NARRATOR 2: The brocade was laid out on the floor. And there it all was—the palace reaching to the sky, the beautiful gardens, the lovely fairy ladies.CHEN: (in amazement) It looks so real. I feel like I could step into it!NARRATOR 3: Just then, a sudden wind whipped through the cottage. It lifted the brocade, blew it out the window, and carried it through the air.NARRATOR 1: The widow and her son rushed outside, only to watch the brocade disappear into the east.WIDOW: It’s gone!NARRATOR 4: And the widow fainted away.NARRATOR 2: Chen carried her to her bed and sat beside her for many hours.NARRATOR 3: At last her eyes opened.WIDOW: (weakly) Chen, you must find the brocade and bring it back. I cannot live without it.CHEN: Don’t worry, Mother. I’ll go at once.NARRATOR 1: Chen gathered a few things and started to the east.NARRATOR 4: He walked for hours, then days, then weeks. But there was no sign of the brocade.NARRATOR 2: One day, Chen came upon a lonely hut.NARRATOR 3: Sitting by the door was an old, leather-skinned woman smoking a pipe. A horse was grazing nearby.OLD WOMAN: Hello, deary. What brings you so far from home?CHEN: I’m looking for my mother’s brocade. The wind carried it to the east.OLD WOMAN: Ah, yes. The brocade of Sun Palace! Well, that wind was sent by the fairy ladies of the palace itself. They’re using the brocade as a pattern for their weaving.CHEN: But my mother will die without it!OLD WOMAN: Well, then, you had best get it back! But you won’t get to Sun Palace by foot, so you’d better ride my horse. It will show you the way.CHEN: Thank you!OLD WOMAN: Oh, don’t thank me yet, deary. Between here and there, you must pass through the flames of Fiery Mountain. If you make a single sound of complaint, you’ll be burnt to ashes. After that, you must cross the Icy Sea. The smallest word of discontent, and you’ll be frozen solid. (with a hard look) Do you still want to go?CHEN: (daunted yet determined) I must get back my mother’s brocade.OLD WOMAN: (approvingly) Good boy. Take the horse and go.NARRATOR 1: Chen climbed on, and the horse broke into a gallop. Before long they came to a mountain all on fire.NARRATOR 4: Without missing a step, the horse started up the slope, leaping through the flames.NARRATOR 2: Chen felt the fire singe his skin, but he bit his lip and made not a sound.NARRATOR 3: At last they came down the other side. When they’d left the flames behind, Chen was surprised to find that his burns were gone.NARRATOR 1: A little later, they came to a sea filled with great chunks of ice.
  32. 32. NARRATOR 4: Without pausing a moment, the horse began leaping from one ice floe to another.NARRATOR 2: Waves showered them with icy spray, so that Chen was soaked and shivering. But he held his tongue and said not a word.NARRATOR 3: Finally they reached the far shore. At once, Chen felt himself dry and warm.NARRATOR 1: It wasn’t long then till they came to Sun Palace. It looked just like his mother’s brocade!NARRATOR 4: He rode to the entrance, sprang from the horse, and hurried into a huge hall.NARRATOR 2: Sitting there at looms were dozens of fairy ladies, who turned to stare at him, then whispered to each other excitedly. On each loom was a copy of his mother’s brocade, and the brocade itself hung in the center of the room.NARRATOR 3: A lady near the door rose from her loom to meet him.LI-EN: (graciously) My name is Li-en, and I welcome you. You are the first mortal ever to reach our palace. What good fortune brings you here?NARRATOR 1: The fairy was so beautiful that for a moment Chen could only stare.NARRATOR 4: Li-en gazed shyly downward.CHEN: Dear lady, I have come for my mother’s brocade.LI-EN: (looks up at him in delight) So you are the widow’s son! How we admire that brocade! None of us has been able to match it. We wish to keep it here till we can.CHEN: But I must bring it home, or my mother will die!NARRATOR 2: Li-en looked alarmed, and a flurry of whispers arose in the room.NARRATOR 3: She stepped away to speak softly with several others, then returned to Chen.LI-EN: We surely must not let that happen to her. Only let us keep the brocade for the rest of the day, so we can try to finish our own. Tomorrow you may take it back with you.CHEN: (joyfully) Thank you, dear lady!NARRATOR 1: The fairies worked busily to finish their brocades. Chen sat near Li-en at her loom.NARRATOR 4: As she wove, he told her about his life in the human world, and she told him about hers at Sun Palace. Many smiles and glances passed between them.NARRATOR 2: When darkness fell, the fairies worked on by the light of a magic pearl.NARRATOR 3: At last Chen’s eyes would stay open no longer, and he drifted to sleep on his chair.NARRATOR 1: One by one the fairies finished or left off, and went out of the hall.NARRATOR 4: Li-en was the last one there, and it was almost dawn when she was done. She cut her brocade from the loom and held it beside the widow’s.LI-EN: (sighs) Mine is good, but the widow’s is still better. If only she could come and teach us herself.NARRATOR 2: Then Li-en had an idea. With needle and thread, she embroidered a small image onto the widow’s brocade—an image of herself on the palace steps.NARRATOR 3: She softly said a spell. Then she left the hall, with a last long smiling gaze at Chen.NARRATOR 1: When Chen awoke, the sun was just rising. He looked around the hall for Li-en, but saw no one. Though he longed to find her to say good-bye, he told himself,CHEN: I must not waste a moment.NARRATOR 4: He rolled up his mother’s brocade, rushed from the hall, and jumped onto the horse.NARRATOR 2: Back he raced, across the Icy Sea,NARRATOR 3: and over Fiery Mountain.NARRATOR 1: When he reached the old woman’s hut, she was standing there waiting for him.

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