2010 Trends in Digital Advertising (for Miami Ad School)

  • 18,018 views
Uploaded on

This is my Industry Hero presentation that I gave to Miami Ad School on 2/1/2010. It describes what I think are the major trends in successful digital marketing for 2010. It's part of a larger …

This is my Industry Hero presentation that I gave to Miami Ad School on 2/1/2010. It describes what I think are the major trends in successful digital marketing for 2010. It's part of a larger presentation that I'm still polishing. Please send your feedback!

A video of my presentation (about 1/2 hour long in total) can be found here:
http://vimeo.com/9296055
http://vimeo.com/9296127
http://vimeo.com/9296429
http://vimeo.com/9297001
Note: it's broken into four parts for easy viewing.

More in: Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
18,018
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
13

Actions

Shares
Downloads
2,213
Comments
17
Likes
177

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • We live in a world where all communications - including those that are generally classified as “traditional”, like print and TV - are heavily integrated with and influenced by digital.
    As marketers, our approach to digital must be different than classical approaches to broadcast media.
    This is because digital is fundamentally different than broadcast media...
  • First, unlike TV or print, digital is highly fragmented.
    This is true from the standpoint of physical devices...

    References:
    Image source: Help! I borrowed this slide from a deck months ago, and I can’t find the source. It’s not my work - if anyone can identify it, I would be very greatful!
  • ...and it’s even more true for software.

    References:
    Image source: http://blogs.forrester.com/.a/6a00d8341c50bf53ef0120a7042d43970b-800wi
  • This fragmentation is even more striking because of the speed at which its changes.
    This info graphic shows the channels in which people have gotten their news over time.
    For the first 200 years, there are only a handlful of major shifts.
    But in the new millenium the shifts are coming much faster.
    This means that the old style of advertising, in which you take 6 months to come up with a big idea, doesn’t really work anymore.

    References:
    Image source: http://www.baekdal.com/articles/management/market-of-information/
  • But the biggest change is that communication is now bidirectional.
    Publishing has been democratized.
    This means that consumers can engage with the media at an unprecedented level.
    And they are taking advantage of these opportunities.
    They talk, share, and aggregate...

    References:
    Image source: Help! I borrowed this slide from a deck months ago, and I can’t find the source. It’s not my work - if anyone can identify it, I would be very greatful!
  • They create, remix, and watch...

    References:
    Image source: Help! I borrowed this slide from a deck months ago, and I can’t find the source. It’s not my work - if anyone can identify it, I would be very greatful!
  • And do all of this for, with, and against brands.

    References:
    Image source: Help! I borrowed this slide from a deck months ago, and I can’t find the source. It’s not my work - if anyone can identify it, I would be very greatful!
  • All these changes show:
    [read slide]
    Even if you want to direct TV spots, the idea of non-digital creative is obsolete.
  • So with that in mind, today I am going to summarize some of the top trends in digital communications that will affect marketing and advertising in 2010.

    References:
    Image source: http://www.dscottmiller.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/2010glasses.jpg
  • One of the most important factors in understanding digital is making an ongoing investment in spending time in the digital space.
    That’s something I do a lot of, and I recommend that you do it too.
    I won’t go into it today, but I wrote a tutorial on how to do this on my blog, so take a look if you’re curious.

    References:
    Image source: http://www.geekologie.com/2008/05/geek_flowchart_from_the_new_yo.php
  • Based on all that time I spend, I’ve identified 3 areas of focus for analyzing these trends.
    [discuss 3 areas]
    Before we dive in, a few caveats:
    Our time is limited so I’ve selected what I think are the 2 most important trends in each area, meaning that they are the most applicable to marketing.
  • References:
    Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/felipetrucco/266053148/sizes/l/
  • I hope that you’re not sick of hearing about social media, because it is going to continue to be huge.
    Consumers are increasingly embracing social technologies - usage of social networks grows exponentially, and, most interestingly, all sorts of products and brands are discussed in social spaces.
  • This participation has shifted the way that consumers respond to media.
    [read quote]

    References
    Quote: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypmfs3z8esI
    Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/altus/309451832/sizes/l/
  • In fact, digital media is frequently the first point of contact for a consumer in their relationship with a brand.
    This effect is called digital primacy.
    A few years ago the thinking was that people really only used the internet to research big ticket purchses, like a car.
    This is no longer the case. Search volume for words like “shampoo” and “tooth paste” are comparable to the volume for car brands.
  • This means that every company or brand needs to at least be aware of what its consumers are saying about it online.
    Not only does this tell you what people think about a brand, but it gives insights onto potential problems and opportunities.
  • There are a ton of great examples of how companies have used this to their advantage, but one that I think is really interesting is the Dell Inspiron Mini.
    In 2008, the existence of the Mini was inadverdently leaked when a tech blogger saw Michael Dell take a prototype out of his laptop bag.
    Rather than trying to put a lid on the resulting rumors, Dell monitored the buzz and speculation so that they could better understand what was expected by the community.
    They used this information to actually tweak the product, and they managed negativity by strategically responding to misinformation.

    References:
    Source: http://www.radian6.com/our-customers/dell/
  • So, while listening to online conversations is critical, it can be equally important to participate in the conversation.
    Digital engagement matters - in a recent study conducted by Razorfish, 97% of consumers said that a digital experience affected whether or not they purchased a particular product from a brand.

    References:
    Data source: Razorfish Feed report, p. 35
  • However, it takes time for a brand to gain good will with its audience.
    The longer a brand waits to join online conversation, the more it will have to offer back to the community before it can promote itself.

    References:
    Image source: http://www.mpdailyfix.com/2009/06/givetake_ratio.html
  • One great example of this is the Aflac duck on Facebook.
    Aflac is an insurance company - not at all sexy.
    However, they use their Facebook page to speak with their community, with amazing results.
    The duck receives more interaction per fan than Ashton Kutcher, Miley Cyrus, and the top 10 product pages on Facebook

    References:
    Case study: http://groundswelldiscussion.com/groundswell/awards2009/detail.php?id=158
    Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/aflacduck
  • In fact, digital media is frequently the first point of contact for a consumer in their relationship with a brand.
    This effect is called digital primacy.
    A few years ago the thinking was that people really only used the internet to research big ticket purchses, like a car.
    This is no longer the case. Search volume for words like “shampoo” and “tooth paste” are comparable to the volume for car brands.
  • In broadcast media, messages are blasted to everyone, equally.

    References:
    Quote: http://www.slideshare.net/ChrisWallaceTSG/social-media-marketing-2853028
    Image: Mean Girls
  • In digital this can be ineffective.
    The internet is full of things that are far more interesting than advertising - mainly, kittens and porn.

    References
    Image source: http://www.mikearauz.com/images/marauz_Id_rather_be_kittens.jpg
  • To cut through this noise, it can be valuable to identify influencers.
    Not just influencers in your audience, but people who will talk to your audience.
    Even though everyone has a voice online, some voices are louder than others.

    References:
    Source: http://darmano.typepad.com/logic_emotion/2006/08/levels_of_influ.html
  • References:
    Case study: http://socialnomics.net/2009/11/12/social-media-roi-examples-video/
    Image: http://fiestamovement.com/
  • The second area of focus is content, which refers to changes and trends in what people consume online
  • I think everyone here can probably identify with the term “information overload”.
    We live in a world in which the amount of information we consume increases exponentially each year.
    It seems obvious to point out that this affects how we manage our attention.
    We currently spend 9.5 hours a day on average consuming media. We can’t spend any more time without giving up sleep.
    Advertising and marketing has to find interesting ways to work within our limited attention spans.
  • One way to combat this difficulty is to think about engagements with users that are small and fast. I call these micro engagements.

    References:
    Quote: http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/archives/2007/12/14/valuing_ineffic.html
    Image: http://www.flickr.com/photos/bradyhiob/4198907072/
  • A micro engagement could be anything. It could be interaction, like the “like” button in Facebook, or content, like a Tweet. Here’s some interesting examples:
  • The most obvious example of a micro interaction is a “thumbs up” like in Digg and Facebook.
    However, micro-interactions can be a bit more sophisticated. Buzzfeed allows users to indicate their reaction to internet memes - LOL, OMG, WTF, etc.
    Not only does this information allow them to tailor their content, it also creates data feeds of content that others found interesting. There’s a LOL feed, an Trashy feed, etc.

    Other Examples:
    http://www.facebook.com/
    http://www.digg.com/

    References:
    Image source: http://buzzfeed.com/
  • Good Facebook pages are also a good example of micro content. Brand pages, like Ben and Jerry’s, release small pieces of content on a regular basis, which ensures that their brand stays top-of-mind for fans.

    References:
    Screen shot: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Ben-And-Jerrys-Ice-Cream/42629356031?ref=ts
  • This principle of small and fast goes beyond just content and interactions.
    Barack Obama used micro payments to revolutionize campaign finance. The majority of his campaign contributions were under $200, which was unprecidented.

    References:
    Image source: http://www.slideshare.net/toscani/obama-fundraising
    Further reading:
    http://www.barackobama.com/
    http://windchimesindia.wordpress.com/2008/11/09/barackobama/
  • References:
    Further reading: http://microgeist.com/2009/03/why-microblogging-really-does-have-value/
  • Another way that brands can add value is through digital curation.
    As Clay Shirky points out, our real problem is not information overload, it’s filter failure.
    Brands have an opportunity to become the filter and to “hand pick” the best information.
  • A lot of brands I work on dream of becoming the leaders in content for their category. For example, a cough medicine brand wants to become the number 1 source of information about cold and flu.
    I try to explain to them that, because there is so much information out there in the world, creating new content is not inherently value. Winning in such a crowded space is also incredibly difficult.
    However, there is a huge value to filtering existing content in a way that provides value to users.


    References:
    Further reading: http://microgeist.com/2009/03/why-microblogging-really-does-have-value/
  • Instead think of the parallel to the art world. A brand has a much better chance of success if it tries to be like the museum - the tastemaker that chooses the best - instead of an artist.


    References:
    Further reading: http://microgeist.com/2009/03/why-microblogging-really-does-have-value/
  • References:
  • References:
    Further reading: http://www.businessinsider.com/can-curation-save-media-2009-4
    http://www.alistapart.com/articles/content-strategist-as-digital-curator/
    http://socialmediatoday.com/SMC/131472
  • We live in a world in which keyboard and mouse are becoming obsolete.
    From the iPhone to the Nintendo Wii, new advances in technology are expanding the ways in which we interact with software.
    Advertising must keep up as our relationship with devices evolves.
  • Location based services use mobile GPS to support targeted marketing based on a person’s current location.
    For example, if your cell phone notified you that lattes are half off when you walk into a Starbucks.

    References:
    Image source: http://senseable.mit.edu/wikicity/rome/images/WikiCityRome-Interface.jpg
    Further reading: http://trendplanner.com/2009/07/23/google-latitude-never-make-plans-again/
    http://www.socializedpr.com/intro-to-foursquare-brightkite-location-based-social-media/
  • A real life example is Foursquare. Foursquare is a social, mobile game in which participants “check in” to bars and restaurants. The person who checks into a venue the most frequently is the “mayor” of that establishment.
    Many venues are taking advantages of this game to provide special offers to the mayors.
    They also can advertise specials when a person checks into a location nearby.
  • The next big trend in interactivity is the internet of things.

    References:
    Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/aszolty/3299566419/
    Quote: http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/us/en/events/sustainable_development/12jan2010/
    Further reading: http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/5_companies_building_the_internet_of_things.php
    http://www.slideshare.net/inakitxu/tweakfest
  • We are beginning to see “smart” objects that are connected to the internet.
    The classic example from the Jetsons is a refrigerator that keeps track of what is inside and allows you to shop online for groceries based on what you really need.
    The arduino platform supports simple networked hardware configuration which has allowed hobbyists and marketers to start building devices with online connectivity.
    For example, a friend of mine, Andrew Zolty, created a device for a bakery that automatically tweets whenever a batch of bread comes out of the oven.
  • There was another cool example if you watched the Grammy’s last night.


    References:
    Image and source information: http://mashable.com/2010/01/31/grammys-imogen-heap-twitdress/

Transcript

  • 1. O hai thar
  • 2. Hi, I’m Marci • I’ve spent the last 10 years working with advertising agencies, Fortune 500 brands, and start-ups to create design and strategy for engaging, effective, and elegant digital experiences. • I’m currently the Director of Digital Strategy at Publicis, where I bring digital insights to traditional advertising teams. • Connect: - Web: http://www.marciikeler.com/ - Twitter: @marciikeler - Email: marci.ikeler@publicis-usa.com, - AIM: designmartini marci@designmartini.com
  • 3. Everything is digital, and digital is different.
  • 4. Digital is fragmented
  • 5. Digital is fragmented
  • 6. Change is fast-paced 100 years 100 years 20 years
  • 7. Communication is bi-directional People talk, share, and aggregate
  • 8. Communication is bi-directional People create, remix, and watch
  • 9. Communication is bi-directional And people do all that for, with, and against brands
  • 10. If you want to work in advertising, you have to understand digital. - this is more true everyday
  • 11. Big in Trends in Digital Technology and Advertising
  • 12. Keeping up with digital • How to keep up with digital: spend time engaging with digital technology and content. • Some tips: http://ow.ly/Zs3E
  • 13. Three areas of focus Sociability - The ways in which brands, companies, and consumers relate to one another online. Content - The types of information and data that will be relevant to consumers online. Interactivity - The ways in which consumers can touch, see, feel, and hear digital devices and interfaces.
  • 14. Part 1: Sociability
  • 15. Sociability: Introduction • Social media was a trend for 2005, 6, 7, 8, and 9 - and it’s not going away in 2010. • Consumers are embracing social: - Consumers are acting in an increasingly social manner digitally. - Social conversations have become related to purchase decisions both online and off. - This will continue to increase exponentionally.
  • 16. Sociability: Trend #1: Listening and engagement “You can’t buy attention anymore. Having a huge budget doesn’t mean anything in social media…The old media paradigm was PAY to play. Now you get back what you authentically put in. You’ve got to be willing to PLAY to play.” - Alex Bogusky
  • 17. Sociability: Trend #1: Listening and engagement • Digital media is frequently the first point of contact for consumers and brands. - Consumers research and talk about brands heavily online. And not just for big purchases. - 69% of connected consumers have provided feedback to a brand online. - This effect is called digital primacy.
  • 18. Sociability: Trend #1: Listening and engagement • Every company needs to be aware of what its consumers are saying online. • Listening allows brands to predict and understand shifts in sentiment, problems, and opportunities. • Areas to focus: conversation volume, sentiment, influencers, and trends. • Closed communities are another valuable tool to create an ongoing consumer focus group.
  • 19. Sociability: Trend #1: Listening and engagement When the existence of Dell’s new Mini 9 laptop was inadvertently leaked, Dell had an opportunity to monitor the pre-launch buzz and strategically correct misinformation. “The intelligence we’ve gathered through social media monitoring has been invaluable. We’re more plugged into the online conversation than ever before. That’s community building at its best.” - Geoff Knox, Supervisor, Dell’s Community Team
  • 20. Sociability: Trend #1: Listening and engagement • Most brands can benefit from engaging directly with these conversations in a natural and honest way. • Digital engagement matters: Has an online experience ever Has that experience influenced Have you ever made your first changed your opinion (positively or whether or not you purchased a purchase from a brand because of a negatively) about a brand? product or service from the brand? digital experience? Source: Razorfish FEED Report
  • 21. Sociability: Trend #1: Listening and engagement
  • 22. Sociability: Trend #1: Listening and engagement Aflac (an insurance company) used their mascot to reach an engaged community, driving awareness of Aflac's products, sponsorships, and philanthrophy. Within one month of launching, the Aflac Duck's Facebook page was receiving more interaction per fan than Ashton Kutcher, Miley Cyrus, and the top 10 product pages on Facebook. In four months, the Aflac Duck's page attracted over 137,000 fans and increased consumer understanding of Aflac, its products, and its philanthropic efforts.
  • 23. Sociability: Trend #1: Listening and engagement Key takeaways • Conversations are happening online. Brands do not have a choice about this. • Failing to listen is a major missed opportunity, and will cause problems in the event of a crisis. • The only choice a brand has is whether or not to participate in the conversation.
  • 24. Sociability: Trend #2: Influencers and word of mouth “You can’t just say it. You have to get people to say it to each other.” - James Farley, CMO Ford
  • 25. Sociability: Trend #2: Influencers and word of mouth
  • 26. Sociability: Trend #2: Influencers and word of mouth • Not everyone has the same influence. • Social influencer strategies must first identify the most connected influencers in their space.
  • 27. Sociability: Trend #2: Influencers and word of mouth By giving away 100 Ford Fiestas to influential bloggers, 37% of Generation Y were aware of the Ford Fiesta before its launch in the United States.  Now, 25% of Ford’s marketing spend has been shifted to digital/social media initiatives.
  • 28. Sociability: Trend #2: Influencers and word of mouth Key takeaways • To create a succesful influencer marketing program, you have to understand who the influencers are and how to reach them. • Influencers will only work for you if you treat them with respect.
  • 29. Part 2: Content
  • 30. Content: Introduction Information is cheap, attention is expensive We now spend 9.5 hours out of every day consuming media, more than any other activity. With continually increasing information – and no increase in the number of hours in a day – our attention becomes rarer and more valuable. Where does advertising fit in? Information Hours in the Day Hours Consuming Media
  • 31. Content: Trend #3: Micro engagements “Time and attention are rare commodities in modern life. Spending time with someone is a valuable signal that you care.” - danah boyd
  • 32. Content: Trend #3: Micro engagements • As our attention is increasingly fragmented, the most successful advertising strategies involve micro engagements - engagements that are both small and fast. This applies to both interaction and content.
  • 33. Content: Trend #3: Micro engagements Micro interactions Sites like Facebook, Digg, and Buzzfeed (pictured) ask users to quickly tag posts by their emotional response. This data is used to better sort posts and to track what information is most useful to a particular audience.
  • 34. Content: Trend #3: Micro engagements Micro content Successful brands on Facebook and Twitter post micro content regularly - which gets a huge response from users and reminds them of the brand.
  • 35. Content: Trend #3: Micro engagements
  • 36. Content: Trend #3: Micro engagements Key takeaways • In an attention-starved world, communication is best kept small and fast. • Success in micro engagement: - Context - provide content and interactions that are relevant to people depending what they’re already doing. Don’t interrupt flow. - Agility - take a science lab approach. See what works through experimentation.
  • 37. Content: Trend #4: Digital curation “It’s not information overload, it’s filter failure.” - Clay Shirky
  • 38. Content: Trend #4: Digital curation • Another way of providing value to users is to curate content, rather than create it. • Creating content that wins in a crowded category is incredibly difficult. • Recognizing that there is an overabundance of information available, what if the brand acts as a gatekeeper for a personalized, refined experience?
  • 39. Content: Trend #4: Digital curation Very hard Doable
  • 40. Content: Trend #4: Digital curation Taste of Home Videos The Taste of Home video library includes not only professional videos created by its team, but also hand-picked user-generated videos. The results: ToH is now the number 1 video recipe site on the web, with minimal cost for content creation.
  • 41. Content: Trend #4: Digital curation Key takeaways • Instead of advertising, provide value. • Don’t enter an already crowded content marketplace. • Filter content in a way that reinforces the brand voice, establishing the brand as a tastemaker. • Curation does not equal aggregation.
  • 42. Part 3: Interactivity
  • 43. Interactivity: Introduction
  • 44. Interactivity: Trend #5: Location based services “Location based ads are the future and will lead a revolution in mobile advertising” - Eric Schmidt, Google
  • 45. Interactivity: Trend #5: Location based services • GPS integration into mobile devices offers new opportunities for location-based advertising and in-store touchpoints.
  • 46. Interactivity: Trend #5: Location based services Key takeaways • GPS and mobile technology gives marketers an unprecendented opportunity to target consumers based on context. • Care must be taken to avoid being perceived as “spammy” - relevence is key. • At the moment the best use of this technology is through opt-in programs.
  • 47. Interactivity: Trend #6: The internet of things “The planet is becoming smarter... intelligence is being infused into the systems that enable services to be delivered.” - Samuel J. Palmisano, IBM
  • 48. Interactivity: Trend #6: The internet of things • In a similar development, we will begin to see “smart” objects that are connected to the internet. • Implementations have been novelty so far, but, like augmented reality, more useful applications will follow.
  • 49. Interactivity: Trend #6: The internet of things In last night’s Grammy awards, Imogen Heap appeared wearing a self-created Twitter dress, which showed messages on Twitter with the hashtag #twitdress live on her collar.
  • 50. Interactivity: Trend #6: The internet of things Key takeaways • Every part of our world is increasingly connected. • Physical computing can drive engagement, offline and on. • RFID and augmented reality will allow everyday objects to be automatically connected online - plan for it.
  • 51. Interactivity: Trend #6: The internet of things • Every part of our world is increasingly connected. • Physical computing can drive engagement, offline and on. • RFID and augmented reality will allow everyday objects to be automatically connected online - plan for it.
  • 52. Questions?