Design for environment methods:state-of-the-art

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Design methods: University of Strathclyde

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Design for environment methods:state-of-the-art

  1. 1. Marc Gómez Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management November 2010 University of Strathclyde
  2. 2. Design for environment Why DfE? Population Natural Resources Environmental damage Need of conscious sustainable design
  3. 3. • Improve environmental performance • Focus on the entire product life- cycle and its derived activities • Reduce amount of overall product energy consumption •Reduce the amount of non- reusable waste Why DfE?
  4. 4. DfE practices  Strategies: focus on specific activity  Design for manufacture: input/output emissions  Design for disassembly/recycling: ease to segregate product parts  Design for transportation: packaging, weight  Design for cradle to cradle: 100% of raw material reutilisation  Methods: way to achieve DfE strategies  Qualitative - Implemented in all stages of product design - Complementing Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)  Quantitative: - Covers full LCA - Procedures from ISO 14040
  5. 5. Qualitative methods + tools associated Method Description Tool Checklist Questionnaire concerning from raw material to disposal Eco-design Checklist Environmental Effect Analysis (EEA) relationship between product and environmental consequences EEA-Form. Product Design Matrix Relationship product operations and environment MET, MECO Matrix Quality Function Deployment for Environment (QFDE) Relation of Voice of Costumer, Engineering metrics, and its eco-impact Weight of importance tables, Environment House of Quality
  6. 6. Quantitative method Method Stage Description Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Goal and Scope Type of information needed How data is organized How results will be displayed Life-cycle Inventory Inputs/Outputs data collection Life-cycle impact assessment Impact Calculation Interpretation Results interpretation Data Deduction
  7. 7. Qualitative vs. Quantitative Method Advantages Disadvantages Qualitative Easy to implement Subjective results Application at several design stages Too general Fast identification Misinterpretation No high environmental education needed Quantitative Accurate Time-consumption Objective Expensive No misiterpretation Based on empirical data
  8. 8. DfE Examples Dyson AirbladeTM • 80% energy saving • 64% faster • removes 99.9 % air bacteria Ford U Model cradle-to-cradle concept car • Hybrid electrical transmission • 45 miles/galon • 300 miles near 0 emissions • 99% reduction in carbon dioxide • 0% waste disposal (recycling or decompose parts)

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