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Design for environment methods:state-of-the-art
Design for environment methods:state-of-the-art
Design for environment methods:state-of-the-art
Design for environment methods:state-of-the-art
Design for environment methods:state-of-the-art
Design for environment methods:state-of-the-art
Design for environment methods:state-of-the-art
Design for environment methods:state-of-the-art
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Design for environment methods:state-of-the-art

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Design methods: University of Strathclyde

Design methods: University of Strathclyde

Published in: Design, Technology, Business
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  • 1. Marc Gómez Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management November 2010 University of Strathclyde
  • 2. Design for environment Why DfE? Population Natural Resources Environmental damage Need of conscious sustainable design
  • 3. • Improve environmental performance • Focus on the entire product life- cycle and its derived activities • Reduce amount of overall product energy consumption •Reduce the amount of non- reusable waste Why DfE?
  • 4. DfE practices  Strategies: focus on specific activity  Design for manufacture: input/output emissions  Design for disassembly/recycling: ease to segregate product parts  Design for transportation: packaging, weight  Design for cradle to cradle: 100% of raw material reutilisation  Methods: way to achieve DfE strategies  Qualitative - Implemented in all stages of product design - Complementing Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)  Quantitative: - Covers full LCA - Procedures from ISO 14040
  • 5. Qualitative methods + tools associated Method Description Tool Checklist Questionnaire concerning from raw material to disposal Eco-design Checklist Environmental Effect Analysis (EEA) relationship between product and environmental consequences EEA-Form. Product Design Matrix Relationship product operations and environment MET, MECO Matrix Quality Function Deployment for Environment (QFDE) Relation of Voice of Costumer, Engineering metrics, and its eco-impact Weight of importance tables, Environment House of Quality
  • 6. Quantitative method Method Stage Description Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Goal and Scope Type of information needed How data is organized How results will be displayed Life-cycle Inventory Inputs/Outputs data collection Life-cycle impact assessment Impact Calculation Interpretation Results interpretation Data Deduction
  • 7. Qualitative vs. Quantitative Method Advantages Disadvantages Qualitative Easy to implement Subjective results Application at several design stages Too general Fast identification Misinterpretation No high environmental education needed Quantitative Accurate Time-consumption Objective Expensive No misiterpretation Based on empirical data
  • 8. DfE Examples Dyson AirbladeTM • 80% energy saving • 64% faster • removes 99.9 % air bacteria Ford U Model cradle-to-cradle concept car • Hybrid electrical transmission • 45 miles/galon • 300 miles near 0 emissions • 99% reduction in carbon dioxide • 0% waste disposal (recycling or decompose parts)

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