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The Western Cape Tourism report end April 2010, via Tourism SA. Contact the Susan Deacon Property Group for all your holiday and property information

The Western Cape Tourism report end April 2010, via Tourism SA. Contact the Susan Deacon Property Group for all your holiday and property information

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  • 1. WESTERN CAPE TOURISM BAROMETER: Your Provincial Tourism Intelligence Source Volume 4, Issue 1 October - December 2009 Produced by Cape Town Routes Unlimited
  • 2. INTRODUCTION This barometer is a synopsis of the travel patterns of tourists (domestic and international) for the period October 2009 - December 2009 in Cape Town and the Western Cape. It provides a snapshot of the industry’s performance - a provincial tourism intelligence source for stakeholders including all critical performance indicators and all regions of the Western Cape Province. The United Nations World Tourism Organisation expects a growth in international arrivals of between 3% and 4% this year. The International Monetary Fund has echoed these sentiments, stating that its assessment of the global economy indicates faster recovery from the economic crisis than expected. International arrivals to South Africa are looking positive, with 2,655,199 tourists visiting the country in Q4 2009. This shows growth of 1.8% when compared to the same period of 2008. Despite the impact of the worst economic recession in 60 years, the Cape Town and Western Cape tourism industry has still performed on par over the holiday season (December 2009 – January 2010) in comparison with December 2008 – January 2009. This is according to the Western Cape Trends survey conducted by CTRU. The survey reveals that over the past holiday season the Western Cape received more domestic visitors (60%) than overseas visitors (35.8%). However, the latter shows that the province retains its popularity amongst overseas visitors. The previous holiday period shows little variance with 59.8% domestic visitors and 36.9% international tourists visiting the province. The fact that the Western Cape tourism industry was able to maintain its foothold despite the economic climate, proves yet again the importance of the industry to the province’s economy. It is therefore imperative that we continue to work closely with all stakeholders to ensure sustainable growth beyond 2010. We trust that this barometer, which contains an interesting case study on Food Tourism, will prove to be a useful tool with your decision-making and planning for the quarters ahead. Yours in tourism for development Calvyn Gilfellan Chief Executive Officer 2
  • 3. IN THIS ISSUE Global Trends National Trends • Visitors to South Africa • National Lodging Statistics Provincial Trends • Performance Indicators • ACSA Arrivals: International, regional & domestic • Attraction Visitation Data o Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens o Table Mountain Aerial Cableway o TMNP: Boulders o TMNP: Cape of Good Hope o V&A Waterfront o Cango Caves o Worcester Living Open-air Museum o Capri Tours & Helicopters o Cape Agulhas Visitation De Hoop Nature Reserve Cape Agulhas Lighthouse Shipwreck Museum o South African National Parks Cape Agulhas National Park Bontebok National Park Wilderness National Park Tsitsikamma National Park Karoo National Park West Coast National Park Regional Visitor Trends • Western Cape visitor trends and patterns • Cape Town region visitor patterns and lodging statistics • Cape Winelands region visitor patterns • Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo region visitor patterns • Cape Overberg region visitor patterns • Cape Central Karoo region visitor patterns • Cape West Coast region visitor patterns Niche Market: Food Tourism 3
  • 4. GLOBAL TRENDS According to World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO 2010), the international visitor arrivals are estimated to have declined worldwide by 4% in 2009 to 880 million. Growth has however returned to international tourism in the last quarter of 2009, after 14 months of negative outcomes, contributing to a better expected full-year result. The 2% increase registered in the last quarter of 2009 contrasted with the declines of 10%, 7% and 2% felt in the first three quarters each respectively. Figure 1: World Inbound Tourism International Tourist Arrivals 1000 901 920 880 900 847 802 800 762 682 682 702 691 700 610 632 567 593 Million 600 534 500 400 300 200 100 0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009* *=provisional figure or data (Source: UNWTO 2010) The full year results show that growth was negative in all regions except for Africa, which hammered the global trend. Europe ended 2009 down 6% after a very complicated first half (- 10%). Destinations in Central, Eastern and Northern Europe were badly affected, while results in Western, Southern and Mediterranean Europe were relatively better. Asia and the Pacific (-2%) showed an extraordinary change in trends, while arrivals declined by 7% between January and June, the second half of 2009 experienced 3% growth reflecting enhanced regional economic results and forecasts. In the Americas (-5%), the Caribbean restored growth during the last four months of 2009. The performance was down in other sub-regions; with the A (H1N1) influenza pandemic aggravating the burden of the economic crisis. 4
  • 5. The Middle East (-6%), though still far from the growth levels of the previous years, had a good second half in 2009. Africa (+5%) flourished with Sub-Saharan destinations doing predominantly well. Regardless of the general decline, several destinations worldwide reported positive growth in 2009 in terms of international visitor arrivals. These include Morocco, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Cuba, Curaçao, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Chile, Colombia, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, the Republic of Korea, Taiwan, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, several Pacific Islands, Iran, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Iceland, Sweden, Hungary, FYR of Macedonia, Italy, Montenegro, Serbia, Turkey, Bahrain, Jordon, Lebanon and Syria. Tourism receipts normally follow the trend in arrivals rather closely, even if they suffer somewhat more in difficult times. Based on the trends through the first three quarters, receipts for 2009 are estimated to have declined by approximately 6%. While this is a discouraging result for an industry familiar with continuous growth, it can also be translated as a sign of competitive resilience. Given the extremely difficult economic environment, this becomes more evident when contrasted with the estimated 12% slump in overall exports as a result of the global crisis (UNWTO 2010). Prospects for 2010 Against the backdrop of both the rise in international tourism figures and overall economic indicators in recent months, UNWTO forecasts a growth in international visitor arrivals of between 3% and 4% in 2010. Another positive aspect is that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has stated that global improvement is occurring faster than expected, when compared with its October assessment which already calculated a return of economic growth in 2010 of 3.1% worldwide, with stronger performance for emerging economies at 5.1% alongside a slower growth at 1.3% for advanced economies. By region, Asia is expected to continue showing the strongest recovery, while Europe and the Americas are expected to recover at a steadier rate. Growth is expected to return to the Middle East, while Africa will continue its positive trend benefiting from the extra boost provided by the 2010 FIFA World Cup TM in South Africa. These improved forecasts are confirmed by the steep increase in the UNWTO Panel of Experts’ Confidence Index for 2010. The experts who moderated prospects for 2010 as ‘better’ or ‘much better than would reasonably be expected’ (61%), clearly outnumber those rating it as ‘the same’ 5
  • 6. (32%) or ‘worse’ (7%). The average score for 2010 (131) is well above neutral 100 and close to the level of the boom years 2004-2007. 2010 provides numerous opportunities, while not eliminating the risks. On the optimistic side, the economy is recovering faster than expected and both business and consumer confidence have picked up. Interest rates and inflation are expected to increase only moderately in the short term. In the tourism sector, the restricted demand that generally follows a slump creates several opportunities and there is the possibility for a rebound among source markets which were negatively affected in 2009, such as UK or the Russian Federation. Another factor that will enhance 2010 is that there will be ample events to attract potential visitors from the Winter Olympics in Vancouver in February to the FIFA World CupTM in June in South Africa and the Shanghai World Expo from May through to October. A drawback of 2010 is unemployment which will remain a challenge. The job calamity is not over yet, predominantly in major advanced economies and many valuable human resources are still at risk. On the economic front, recovery in major tourism source markets, especially Europe and the USA, is still frail and households and company budgets may face additional strain from the steady withdrawal of incentive measures as well as from possible increases in taxation as an effect of growing public deficits. Oil prices are expected to remain unstable through 2010 and security threats as well as potential of increased related hassle and costs for travellers are still a challenge. In conclusion, although the overall impact of the A (H1N1) virus was milder than anticipated, experience from previous pandemics show that the situation could once again become testing. 2010 will be characterised by a rough business environment for the tourism sector as revenues and yields are expected to improve at a measured pace than travel volumes. Although projections are positive, 2010 will be a challenging year. “Many countries were quick in reacting to the crisis and actively implemented measures to mitigate its impact and stimulate recovery. Although we expect growth to return in 2010, a premature withdrawal of these stimulus measures and the temptation to impose extra taxes may jeopardise the pace of rebound in tourism. As highlighted in the UNWTO Roadmap to Recovery, the sector can make a vital contribution to economic recovery, particularly as a primary vehicle for job creation and the transformation to the Green Economy. But to do so we need serious global policies that are supportive of tourism.” said Mr. Rifai, the Secretary-General of the World Tourism Organisation UNWTO. 6
  • 7. Table 1: International Tourists Arrivals by (Sub) region (Sub) region 2009* 09/08 (million) % World 880 -4.3 Europe 459.7 -5.6 Northern Europe 52.6 -7.7 Western Europe 145.8 -4.3 Central/Eastern Europe 91.6 -8.2 Southern/Mediterean Europe 169.6 -4.7 Asia and the Pacific 180.5 -1.9 North-East Asia 97.6 -3.4 South-East Asia 62.0 0.4 Oceania 10.9 -1.8 South Asia 10.0 -2.7 Americas 139.6 -5.1 North America 91.9 -6.0 Caribbean 19.7 -2.4 Central America 7.8 -5.7 South America 20.1 -3.3 Africa 48.1 5.1 North Africa 17.7 2.9 Sub-Saharan Africa 30.4 6.4 Middle East 52.5 -5.6 *=provisional figure or data (Source: UNWTO 2010) 7
  • 8. Global Lodging Statistics In the table below, the RevPar (revenue per available room) for international hotels is being illustrated based on the data provided by STR Global (2010). According to the table, hotel RevPar of all regions experienced an increase in December 2009. Table 2: International Hotel Performance for year-on-year December 2009 Region Occupancy (%) Average daily rate ($) RevPar ($) Americas 44.60 96.68 43.12 Asia/Pacific 62.10 129.03 80.13 Europe 52.60 129.98 67.98 Middle East 52.80 166.53 87.93 (Source: HotelBenchmark by STR Global 2010) 8
  • 9. NATIONAL TRENDS South Africa received 2,655,199 international arrivals in Q4 2009which was a 1.8% increase from Q4 2008. Growth was experienced in October (5.8%) and in November (4.3%) and a decline in December (-3.7%) from the same months of the previous year. Figure 2: Q4 2007-2009 international arrivals to South Africa by month 3,000,000 8.0% Number of international arrivals 2,500,000 6.0% 4.0% 08/09 % change 2,000,000 2.0% 1,500,000 0.0% 1,000,000 ‐2.0% 500,000 ‐4.0% 0 ‐6.0% October November December TOTAL   Q4 2007 792,913 795,122 881,126 2,469,161 Q4 2008 827,186 816,039 964,190 2,607,415 Q4 2009 875,313 850,896 928,990 2,655,199 08/09 % change 5.8% 4.3% ‐3.7% 1.8% 9
  • 10. Across the regions, South Africa received the most visitors from Africa and the Middle East with 2,030,711 arrivals, followed by Europe (418,715), the Americas (99,813) and Asia & Australasia (87,054). Figure 3: Q4 2007-2009 International arrivals to South Africa by region of origin Number of international arrivals 3,000,000 10.0% 2,500,000 8.0% 08/09 % change 2,000,000 6.0% 1,500,000 4.0% 1,000,000 2.0% 500,000 0.0% 0 ‐2.0% Africa and  Asia &  Americas Europe TOTAL Middle East Australasia Q4 2007 1,804,571 70,560 93,858 458,291 2,469,161 Q4 2008 1,996,724 96,810 79,702 419,406 2,607,415 Q4 2009 2,030,711 99,813 87,054 418,715 2,655,199 08/09 % change 1.7% 3.1% 9.2% ‐0.2% 1.8% The United Kingdom (142,449) was the top overseas source market to South Africa, followed by Germany (73,050), the USA (65,545), the Netherlands (42,948) and France (33,202). Figure 4: Q4 2009 Top overseas source markets for South Africa 160,000 140,000 Number of overseas visitors 120,000 100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 0 October November December TOTAL   UK 44,160 43,323 54,966 142,449 Germany 24,684 26,665 21,701 73,050 USA 22,115 18,859 24,571 65,545 The Netherlands 16,362 14,342 12,244 42,948 France 13,070 10,997 9,135 33,202 10
  • 11. According to Statssa 2009, the majority (97.1%) of visitors were in South Africa for holiday in October 2009. This is a large disparity compared with those who have come to study (1.2%) and those on businesses (1.6%). Visitors from Australia (97.9%), Europe (97.7%), North America (97.5%), Central and South America (96.7%), Middle East (92.6%) and Asia (92%) were in South Africa for holiday. Visitors from Middle East and Asia were more diverse in their purpose. Middle East and Asia had 5.8% and 6.2% respectively of their visitors to South Africa for business. Additionally, students made up 1.5% and 1.4% of Middle East and Asia visitors respectively. Although the majority (97.3%) of African visitors came to South Africa for the holidays, there is distinction between visitors from SADC countries and ‘other’ African countries, namely: • While 97.5% of visitors from the SADC countries were on holiday, 92.6% of the visitors from ‘other’ African countries were on holiday. 87.4% of the visitors on holiday came from North Africa and 9.9% of the visitors came for business. • North Africa, East and Central Africa as well as West Africa had 9.9%, 4.5% and 3.4% respectively of their visitors in South Africa for business; compared with only 1.2% of business persons among the visitors from SADC countries. • Furthermore, 3.4%, 2.6% and 1.9% of visitors from East and Central Africa, North Africa and West Africa respectively were students; compared with only 1.2% among visitors from SADC countries. 11
  • 12. PROVINCIAL TOURISM PERFORMANCE KEY INDICATORS ACSA Cape Town International Airport Arrivals Figure 5: Q4 2006-2009 International Arrivals through Cape Town International Airport 250,000 0 ‐2 International Arrivals 200,000 08/09 % Change ‐4 150,000 ‐6 100,000 ‐8 50,000 ‐10 0 ‐12 October November December Total 2006 48,729 69,035 76,022 193,786 2007 52,202 72,060 77,712 201,974 2008 61,957 68,338 78,090 208,385 2009 55,101 67,020 77,474 199,595 08/09 % Change -11.1 -1.9 -0.8 -4.2 (Source: ACSA, 2009) In Q4 2009, a total of 199,595 international arrivals were received at the Cape Town International Airport, which reflected a 4.2% decline compared to Q4 2008. Declines were experienced across all three months of the quarter: October (-11.1%), November (-1.9%) and December (-0.8%). 12
  • 13. Figure 6: Q4 2006-2009 Regional arrivals1 at Cape Town International Airport 25,000 0 ‐2 20,000 Regional Arrivals ‐4 08/09 % Change 15,000 ‐6 ‐8 10,000 ‐10 ‐12 5,000 ‐14 0 ‐16 October November December Total 2006 7,271 6,608 6,599 20,478 2007 7,017 6,518 6,165 19,700 2008 6,842 6,208 6,248 19,298 2009 5,896 5,709 5,422 17,027 08/09 % Change -13.8 -8 -13.2 -11.8 (Source: ACSA, 2009) In Q4 2009, the Cape Town International Airport received 17,027 regional arrivals, which was an overall decline of 11.8%. Declines were also experienced across the months of October (-13.8%), November (-8%) and December (-13.2%). Figure 7: Q4 2006-2009 Domestic arrivals2 at Cape Town International Airport 1,000,000 6 900,000 800,000 5 700,000 Domestic Arrivals 4 600,000 08/09 % Change 500,000 3 400,000 300,000 2 200,000 1 100,000 0 0 October November December Total 2006 263,858 260,835 302,218 826,911 2007 306,992 298,558 309,902 915,452 2008 284,787 260,434 291,498 836,719 2009 292,557 267,403 306,468 866,428 08/09 % Change 2.7 2.7 5.1 3.6 (Source: ACSA, 2009) 1 Regional arrivals are defined by the Government Gazette as the landing charge in respect of an aircraft which lands at a company airport that has been engaged in a flight where the airport of departure of that aircraft is in Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia or Swaziland. 2 Domestic arrivals are defined by the Government Gazette as the landing charge in respect of an aircraft which lands at a company airport that has been engaged in a flight where the airport of departure of that aircraft is in South Africa. 13
  • 14. Cape Town International Airport received 866, 428 domestic arrivals in Q4 2009, with an overall increase of 3.6% from the same period of the previous year. Across all three months in the quarter, increases were experienced: October (2.7%), November (2.7%) and December (5.1%). ATTRACTIONS Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens The Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens received 195, 024 visitors in Q4 2009, with an overall 1.6% increase in comparison with Q4 2008. November (-9.2%) was the only month that experienced a drop in visitor numbers in Q4 2008, while October (4.5%) and December (9%) experienced growth from the same period of the previous year. Figure 8: Q4 2006-2009 Visitation to Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens 250,000 10.0 200,000 5.0 Number of visitors 08/09 % Change 150,000 0.0 100,000 -5.0 50,000 -10.0 0 -15.0 October November December Total 2006 66,465 68,060 74,166 208,691 2007 64,016 66,224 72,275 202,515 2008 62,006 62,181 67,675 191,862 2009 64,786 56,479 73,759 195,024 08/09 % Change 4.5 -9.2 9.0 1.6 (Source: Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, 2009) Table Mountain Aerial Cableway Compared to Q4 2008, visitation to Table Mountain via the Aerial Cableway experienced an overall decrease of 5.8% for Q4 2009. October (-17.9%) and November (-17.1%) have experienced declines when compared to the same period of the previous year, while December (13.7%) experienced an increase. 14
  • 15. Figure 9: Q4 2007-2009 Visitation to Table Mountain Aerial Cableway 300,000 20.0 13.7 15.0 250,000 Number of visitors 10.0 200,000 08/09 % Change 5.0 150,000 0.0 -5.8 ‐5.0 100,000 ‐10.0 50,000 -17.9 -17.1 ‐15.0 0 ‐20.0 October November December Total 2007 2008 2009 08/09 % Change (Source: Table Mountain Aerial Cableway, 2009) Table Mountain National Park: Boulders The Table Mountain National Park: Boulders received 170, 465 visitors in Q4 2009, compared to 182, 260 visitors in Q4 2008 which was a 6.5% year-on year decline. Across all three months of the quarter, declines were experienced in October (-4.7%), November (-10.7%) and December (- 4.2%). Figure 10: Q4 2006-2009 Visitation to Table Mountain: Boulders 250,000 0.00 Number of visitors 200,000 ‐2.00 08/09 % Change ‐4.00 150,000 ‐6.00 100,000 ‐8.00 50,000 ‐10.00 0 ‐12.00 October November December Total 2006 63,872 71,311 69,320 204,503 2007 62,965 66,592 87,471 217,028 2008 56,109 59,909 66,242 182,260 2009 53,463 53,522 63,480 170,465 08/09 % Change ‐4.72 ‐10.66 ‐4.17 ‐6.47 (Source: Table Mountain National Park, 2009) 15
  • 16. Table Mountain National Park: Cape of Good Hope The Table Mountain National Park: Cape of Good Hope received 253,498 visitors in Q4 2009 compared to 249, 596 visitors in Q4 2008, with 1.6% year-on-year increase. October (0.16%) and December (6.5%) enjoyed growth from the same period of the previous year, while November (- 3.1%) experienced a decline. Figure 11: Q4 2006-2009 Visitation to Table Mountain National Park: Cape of Good Hope 300,000 8.00  250,000 6.00  Number of visitors 08/09 % Change 200,000 4.00  150,000 2.00  100,000 0.00  50,000 ‐2.00  0 ‐4.00  October November December Total 2006 78,933 90,954 108,391 278,278 2007 78,759 74,433 111,293 264,485 2008 75,429 78,768 95,399 249,596 2009 75,550 76,321 101,627 253,498 08/09 % Change 0.16  ‐3.11 6.53 1.56 (Source: Table Mountain National Park, 2009) V&A Waterfront In Q4 2009 the V&A Waterfront received a total of 5,727,840 visitors with 5% decline in comparison to Q4 2008. Accross all three months in the quarter declines in visitation were experienced with October (-3.5%), November (-4.1%) and December (-6.8%). 16
  • 17. Figure 12: Q4 2006-2009 Visitation to the V&A Waterfront 7,000,000 0.0 6,000,000 ‐1.0 Number of visitors ‐2.0 08/09 % Change 5,000,000 ‐3.0 4,000,000 ‐4.0 3,000,000 ‐5.0 2,000,000 ‐6.0 1,000,000 ‐7.0 0 ‐8.0 October November December Total 2006 1,747,012 1,865,378 2,321,142 5,933,532 2007 1,769,739 1,924,345 2,270,199 5,964,283 2008 1,834,999 1,870,908 2,322,213 6,028,120 2009 1,770,526 1,793,333 2,163,981 5,727,840 08/09 % Change -3.5 -4.1 -6.8 -5.0 (Source: V&A Waterfront, 2009) Cango Caves The Cango Caves received a total of 66,453 visitors in Q4 2009 with an overall decline of 3.2% on Q4 2008. Both October (-7.2%) and November (-6.8%) experienced a year-on-year decrease, while December (1.8%) enjoyed growth in 2009 as in Q4 2008. 17
  • 18. Figure 13: Q4 2006-2009 Visitation to the Cango Caves 90,000 3 80,000 2 1 70,000 0 Number of visitors 60,000 08/09 % Change ‐1 50,000 ‐2 40,000 ‐3 30,000 ‐4 ‐5 20,000 ‐6 10,000 ‐7 0 ‐8 October November December Total 2006 20,391 24,041 33,266 77,698 2007 20,800 22,321 32,957 76,078 2008 19,852 19,004 29,786 68,642 2009 18,418 17,703 30,332 66,453 08/09 % Change -7.2 -6.8 1.8 -3.2 (Source: Cango Caves, 2009) The Cango Caves received 31, 751 foreign visitors in Q4 2009 which was a 2.9% decrease from the 32,711 foreign visitors received in Q4 2008. October (-15.1%) and November (-2.7%) received a drop in visitor numbers, while December (18.5%) enjoyed growth in Q4 2008. Figure 14: Q4 2006-2009 Total foreign visits to the Cango Caves 45,000 25 Number of foreign visitors 40,000 20 35,000 15 08/09 % Change 30,000 10 25,000 5 20,000 0 15,000 ‐5 10,000 ‐10 5,000 ‐15 0 ‐20 October November December Total    2006 13,862 18,271 8,994 41,127 2007 13,906 16,891 9,454 40,251 2008 12,667 13,005 7,039 32,711 2009 10,758 12,654 8,339 31,751 08/09 % Change ‐15.1 ‐2.7 18.5 ‐2.9 (Source: Cango Caves, 2009) 18
  • 19. The figure below illustrates the source markets of the Cango Caves received in Q4 2009 by month. Most visitors to the Cango Caves were from South Africa (34,702), followed by Germany (9,246), UK (5,619), the Netherlands (3,986), France (1,194) and USA (625). All visitors across the top source markets experienced a drop in visitor numbers on Q4 2008; France (-36%), Germany (-7.5%), the Netherlands (-12.4%), USA (-8.8%), UK (-9.5%) and South Africa (-3.4%). Figure 15: Q4 2009 Cango Caves’ Core Source Markets 40,000 0 35,000 -5 Number of visitors 08/09 % Change 30,000 -10 25,000 -15 20,000 -20 15,000 -25 10,000 -30 5,000 -35 0 -40 France Germany Netherlands USA UK SA October 687 3,113 1,648 190 1,943 7,660 November 456 4,341 1,547 237 2,522 5,049 December 51 1,792 791 198 1,154 21,993 Total 1,194 9,246 3,986 625 5,619 34,702 08/09 % Change -36 -7.5 -12.4 -8.8 -9.5 -3.4 (Source: Cango Caves, 2009) Worcester Living Open-Air Museum The Worcester Living Open–Air Museum received a total of 9,216 visitors in Q4 2009, with an overall decline of 6.6% when compared to Q4 of 2008. October (-12.1%) and December (-8.8%) experienced a decline but November (2.6%) achieved growth when compared to the same period in the previous year. 19
  • 20. Figure 16: Q4 2006-2009 Visitation to Worcester Living Open – Air Museum 12,000 4.0 2.0 10,000 0.0 8,000 ‐2.0 Number of visitors 08/09 % Change ‐4.0 6,000 ‐6.0 4,000 ‐8.0 ‐10.0 2,000 ‐12.0 0 ‐14.0 October November December Total 2006 2,201 2,300 3,502 8,003 2007 2,605 2,854 3,546 9,005 2008 3,250 2,859 3,758 9,867 2009 2,856 2,934 3,426 9,216 08/09 % Change -12.1 2.6 -8.8 -6.6 (Source: Worcester Living Open – Air Museum, 2009) Capri Tours & Helicopters In Q4 2009 Cape Tours & Helicopters in George received a total of 601 passengers. December (339) welcomed the majority of passengers, followed by October (146) and November (116). A total of 126 flights were achieved in December, over a total of 24 days. Figure 17: Q4 2009 Visitation to Capri Tours & Helicopters 700 600 Number of visitors 500 400 300 200 100 0 Total days flown Total passengers Total flights October 18 146 30 November 18 116 44 December 24 339 126 Total 60 601 200 (Source: Capri Tours & Helicopters, 2009) 20
  • 21. CAPE AGULHAS ATTRACTIONS Illustrated below are the Q4 2009 statistics of visitors to the main attractions within the Cape Agulhas town, located within the Cape Overberg region. Illustrated attractions include De Hoop Nature Reserve, Cape Agulhas Lighthouse and the Shipwreck Museum. De Hoop Nature Reserve De Hoop Nature Reserve received 7,103 visitors for Q4 2009 and achieved a growth rate of 38.8%, when compared to Q4 2008. Across the months of November (295.7%) and December (17.6%), growth was achieved in Q4 2009 against visitor numbers in Q4 2008. In November 2008 the Cape Overberg region experienced severe floods which affected De Hoop Nature reserve as well, thus explaining the enormous growth in visitor numbers for November. For weeks some of the roads leading to the reserve were closed off and the management of the reserve had to evacuate all hikers that were already on the trail and cancel other bookings since the conditions were too dangerous. Figure 18: Q4 2006-2009 Visitation to De Hoop Nature Reserve 8,000 350.00 7,000 300.00 Number of visitors 6,000 250.00 08/09 % Change 5,000 200.00 4,000 150.00 3,000 100.00 2,000 50.00 1,000 0.00 0 ‐50.00 October November December Total 2006 1,311 1,560 1,980 4,851 2007 1,149 1,697 2,087 4,933 2008 2,625 627 1,866 5,118 2009 2,427 2,481 2,195 7,103 08/09 % Change ‐7.54 295.69 17.63 38.78 (Source: Cape Agulhas Tourism, 2009) Cape Agulhas Lighthouse The Cape Agulhas Lighthouse received 8,035 visitors for Q4 2009 with an overall growth of 25.6% when compared with Q4 2008. Growth was achieved across two months, November (354. 61%) and December (7.46%), while October experienced a decline (-5.78%), when compared to the same period of the previous year. The significant increase in November 2009 was due to renovations taking place at the Cape Agulhas Lighthouse in November 2008. 21
  • 22. Figure 19: Q4 2006-2009 Visitation to Cape Agulhas Lighthouse 12,000 400.00 350.00 10,000 Number of visitors 300.00 8,000 250.00 08/09 % Change 200.00 6,000 150.00 4,000 100.00 50.00 2,000 0.00 0 ‐50.00 October November December Total 2006 2,306 2,542 5,390 10,238 2007 2,018 2,148 5,137 9,303 2008 1,729 401 4,265 6,395 2009 1,629 1,823 4,583 8,035 08/09 % Change ‐5.78 354.61 7.46 25.65 (Source: Cape Agulhas Tourism, 2009) Shipwreck Museum The Shipwreck Museum received a total of 2,440 visitations for Q4 2009 and experienced a decline of 13.4%. November (1.16%) was the only month that recorded growth while October (- 12.1%) and December (-19.7%) experienced a decline in visitors when compared to the same period of 2008. Figure 20: Q4 2006-2009 Visitation to Shipwreck Museum 3,500 5.00 3,000 0.00 Number of visitors 2,500 ‐5.00 08/09 % Change 2,000 ‐10.00 1,500 ‐15.00 1,000 500 ‐20.00 0 ‐25.00 October November December Total 2006 720 800 1,160 2,680 2007 862 828 1,265 2,955 2008 694 603 1,520 2,817 2009 610 610 1,220 2,440 08/09 % Change ‐12.10 1.16 ‐19.74 ‐13.38 (Source: Cape Agulhas Tourism, 2009) 22
  • 23. SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL PARKS A total of 153 806 travellers visited the South African National Parks across the Western Cape in Q4 2009. Listed below is the total number of visitors received at each National Park: • West Coast National Park (60,252) • Tsitsikamma National Park (56,614) • Karoo National Park (11,891) • Wilderness National Park (11,888) • Agulhas National Park (3,035) • Bontebok National Park (5,096) Figure 21: Q4 2006-2009 Visit to the South African National Parks in the Western Cape Agulhas National  Bontebok National  West Coast  Park, 8,035 Park, 5,096 National Park,  Wilderness  60,282 National Park,  11,888 Tsitsikamma  National Park,  Karoo National  56,614 Park, 11,891 Lodging statistics for South African National Parks The Tsitsikamma National Park achieved the highest (6,657) number of unit nights sold in Q4 2009 and achieved a growth of 5.95% compared to Q4 2008. While growth in the number of unit nights sold was achieved in the West Coast National Park (6.6%) and Bontebok National Park (20.9%), a decline was experienced in both the Karoo National Park (-4.9%) and the Wilderness National Park (-8.4%). The Tsitsikamma National Park (2.9%) achieved growth in the number of bed nights sold. On the other hand, the Bontebok National Park (-2.8%), Karoo National Park (- 5.5%), Wilderness National Park (-9.3%) and West Coast National Park (-15.5%) experienced 23
  • 24. declines in their number of bed nights sold. Camping nights sold in the Bontebok National Park (88.5%) recorded the highest growth, followed by Tsitsikamma National Park (0.7%) and Karoo National Park (0.6%). The Wilderness National Park (-0.8%) experienced a decline in camping bed nights sold. Table 3: Q4 2008/2009 Lodging Statistics for South African National Parks Accommodation Q4 2009 Karoo Wilderness Tsitsikamma West Coast Bontebok Unit nights sold 2008 2,692 2,768 6,283 183 536 Unit nights sold 2009 2,559 2,534 6,657 195 648 08/09%Change -4.94 -8.45 5.95 6.56 20.90 Bed nights sold 2008 6,598 6,653 15,196 698 1,506 Bed nights sold 2009 6,234 6,037 15,632 591 1,464 08/09%Change -5.52 -9.26 2.87 -15.53 -2.79 Camping nights sold 2008 1,372 3,029 4,953 - 753 Camping nights sold 2009 1,383 3,004 4,985 - 1,419 08/09%Change 0.58 -0.83 0.65 - 88.45 (Source: South African National Park, 2009) The Agulhas National Park received a total of 8,035 visitors in Q4 2009 with an overall growth of 31.3% when compared to Q4 2008. October (11.9%), November (354.6%) and December (7.4%) increases were experienced when compared to the same period in the previous year. 24
  • 25. Figure 22: Q4 2007-2009 Visits to Agulhas National Park Agulhas National Park 10,000 400.00 9,000 Number of visitors 350.00 08/09 % Change 8,000 300.00 7,000 6,000 250.00 5,000 200.00 4,000 150.00 3,000 100.00 2,000 1,000 50.00 0 0.00 October November December Total 2007 2,018 2,148 5,137 9,303 2008 1,456 401 4,265 6,122 2009 1,629 1,823 4,583 8,035 08/09 % Change 11.88 354.61 7.46 31.25 (Source: South African National Park, 2009) The Bontebok National Park received a total of 5, 096 visitors in Q4 2009, with an overall increase of 21.1% when compared to Q4 2008. October (0.3%), November (60.8%) as well as December (13.5%) recorded growth when compared to the same period of the previous year. Figure 23: Q4 2007-2009 Visits to Bontebok National Park Bontebok National Park 6,000 70.00 5,000 60.00 Number of visitors 08/09 % Change 50.00 4,000 40.00 3,000 30.00 2,000 20.00 1,000 10.00 0 0.00 October November December Total 2007 1,050 1,362 1,924 4,336 2008 1,300 1,037 1,872 4,209 2009 1,304 1,667 2,125 5,096 08/09 % Change 0.31 60.75 13.51 21.07 (Source: South African National Park, 2009) 25
  • 26. Figure 24: Q4 2007-2009 Visits to Wilderness National Park Wilderness National Park 14,000 50.00 12,000 40.00 Number of visitors 08/09 % Change 10,000 30.00 20.00 8,000 10.00 6,000 0.00 4,000 ‐10.00 2,000 ‐20.00 0 ‐30.00 October November December Total 2007 1,696 1,481 844 4,021 2008 3,575 2,861 4,224 10,660 2009 2,698 3,321 5,869 11,888 08/09 % Change ‐24.53 16.08 38.94 11.52 (Source: South African National Park, 2009) The Wilderness National Park received 11,888 visitors in Q4 2009 with an overall growth of 11.5% when compared to Q4 2008. December (38.9%) had the highest growth followed by November (16.1%). October experienced a decline of 24.5% compared to the same period in the previous year. Figure 25: Q4 2007-2009 Visits to Tsitsikamma National Park Tsitsikamma National Park 70,000 6.00 60,000 5.00 Number of visitors 4.00 50,000 08/09 % Change 3.00 40,000 2.00 30,000 1.00 20,000 0.00 10,000 -1.00 0 -2.00 October November December Total 2007 17,502 19,407 21,344 58,253 2008 15,656 16,406 23,226 55,288 2009 15,508 17,330 23,776 56,614 08/09 % Change -0.95 5.63 2.37 2.40 (Source: South African National Park, 2009) 26
  • 27. The Tsitsikamma National Park received a total of 56,614 visitors with an overall increase of 2.4% when compared to Q4 2008. Growth were achieved in November (5.6%) and December (2.4%), while October (-0.95%) experienced a decline in comparison with Q4 2008. The Karoo National Park received 11,981 visitors in Q4 2009 with an overall growth of 9.9% when compared to Q4 2008: October (14.1%), November (17.15%) and December (9.94%). Figure 25: Q4 2007-2009 Visits to Karoo National Park Karoo National Park 14,000 20.00 18.00 Number of visitors 12,000 16.00 08/09 % Change 10,000 14.00 8,000 12.00 10.00 6,000 8.00 4,000 6.00 4.00 2,000 2.00 0 0.00 October November December Total 2007 1,795 2,467 5,464 9,726 2008 2,530 2,391 5,895 10,816 2009 2,887 2,801 6,203 11,891 08/09 % Change 14.11 17.15 5.22 9.94 (Source: South African National Park, 2009) The West Coast National Park experienced a total of 60,282 visitors in Q4 2009 with an overall decline of 15.4%. Increases were achieved in October (1.9%) and November (51.3%), while December (-37.9%) had a decrease when compared to the same period in the previous year. 27
  • 28. Figure 27: Q4 2007-2009 Visits to West Coast National Park West Coast National Park 80,000 60.00 70,000 50.00 Number of visitors 40.00 60,000 08/09 % Change 30.00 50,000 20.00 10.00 40,000 0.00 30,000 ‐10.00 20,000 ‐20.00 ‐30.00 10,000 ‐40.00 0 ‐50.00 October November December Total 2007 12,172 10,716 16,671 39,559 2008 11,056 13,026 47,167 71,249 2009 11,260 19,706 29,316 60,282 08/09 % Change 1.85 51.28 ‐37.85 ‐15.39 (Source: South African National Park, 2009) 28
  • 29. Q4 2009 WESTERN CAPE TRENDS This section covers the analysis for the Western Cape travel and tourism trends, as well as patterns for each region. This issue includes all six regions of the Western Cape: Cape Town, Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo, Cape Winelands, Cape West Coast, Cape Karoo and Cape Overberg. A total of 5,885 responses were received from the six regions over the months of October (2,368), November (1,572) and December (1,945) in Q4 2009. Origin of visitors In Q4 2009 the Western Cape received 60% domestic visitors, 35.8% from overseas and 1% who originated from Africa (excluding domestic). Of the overseas visitors, 10.6% originated from the UK, followed by Germany (8.4%), the Netherlands (4.4%), USA (1.7%), Switzerland (1.4%), France (1.3%), Belgium (1.2%). 3.2% of visitors did not indicate their country of origin. Figure 28: Q4 2009 Origin of overseas visitors 12.0% 10.6% 10.0% % of Overseas Visitors 8.4% 8.0% 6.0% 4.4% 4.0% 3.2% 1.7% 2.0% 1.4% 1.3% 1.2% 0.0% 29
  • 30. Of the domestic visitors, the majority (27.5%) were from the Western Cape, followed by Gauteng (8%), KwaZulu-Natal (1.8%), Eastern Cape (1.3%), Mpumalanga (1%), Free State (0.9%), Northern Cape (0.8%), North West (0.6%) and Limpopo (0.4%). Figure 29: Q4 2009 Domestic visitors’ province of origin 30.0% 27.5% 25.0% % of Domestic Visitors 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 8.0% 5.0% 1.8% 1.3% 0.9% 1.0% 0.8% 0.6% 0.4% 0.0% The table below illustrates the origin of visitors to each region within the Western Cape in Q4 2009. Cape Town and Cape Winelands were the only two regions that received more overseas visitors than domestic. Cape Town received the most (85.3%) overseas visitors amongst the regions, followed by Cape Winelands (53.2%). The domestic visitors dominated across the remainder of the regions, the Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo received the most (79%) domestic visitors, followed by the Cape Overberg (78.8%) and Cape West Coast (74.1%). The Cape West Coast received the most (1.4%) visitors originating from Africa (excluding domestic), followed by Cape Town (1.3%). Table 4: Q4 2009 Distribution of visitors by region Region Overseas (%) Domestic (%) Africa (excluding domestic) (%) Cape Town 85.3 8.6 1.3 Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo 8.7 79.0 0.2 Cape Winelands 53.2 44.1 1.2 Cape West Coast 23.6 74.1 1.4 Cape Karoo 25.4 72.5 1.2 Cape Overberg 20.4 78.8 0.2 30
  • 31. Travel group size and length of stay The overall average travel group size to the Western Cape in Q4 2009 was three and the most common was two. The majority (48.9%) of visitors travelled in pairs, followed by 22% who travelled alone, 10.3% travelled in fours and 9.3% in threes. Of the overseas visitors, the overall average travel group size was three and the most common was two. Most (63.4%) of the overseas visitors travelled in pairs, followed by 11.2% who travelled alone, 9.1% travelled in fours and 8.9% in threes. The overall average as well as most common travel group of the domestic visitors was two. Likewise to the overseas visitors, the majority (40.2%) of the overseas visitors travelled in pairs, followed by 28.7% who travelled alone, 11% travelled in fours and 9.6% in threes. Figure 30: Q4 2009 Travel group size Fours, 10.3% Alone, 22.0% Threes, 9.3% Twos, 48.9% The overall average length of stay of visitors to the Western Cape was four nights and the most common was one night. 58.9% of visitors indicated that they stayed overnight within the respective regions. 29.6% of visitors stayed for one night, followed by 10.6% who stayed for two nights, 4.4% for three nights, 3.3% for four nights and 2.7% stayed for five nights. 74.1% of overseas visitors indicated that they stayed overnight. The overall average length of stay amongst the overseas visitors was five nights and the most common was one night. 30.1% of the overseas visitors stayed for one night, followed by 16.2% who stayed for two nights, 6% for three nights, 4.9% for four nights and 4.6% for five nights. 31
  • 32. Figure 31: Q4 2009 Length of stay 5 nights 2.7% 4 nights 3.3% 3 nights 4.4% 2 nights 10.6% 1 night 29.6% 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 35.0% The overall average length of stay amongst the domestic visitors was three nights and the most common was one night. 48.9% of domestic visitors stayed overnight, 27.6% stayed for one night, 7.6% for two nights, 3.5% for three nights, 2.2% for four nights and 1.6% for five nights. Table 5: Q4 2009 Average group size and length of stay by region Region Average Group size Average length of stay Cape Town 2.3 9.8 Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo 2.4 1.9 Cape Winelands 2.9 3.3 Cape West Coast 2.6 4.0 Cape Karoo 2.6 2.2 Cape Overberg 1.8 4.7 The table above illustrates the average group size and the average length of stay by region within the Western Cape. The Cape Winelands, Cape West Coast and Cape Karoo regions received the highest average group size. Cape Town enjoyed the highest (ten nights) average length of stay, followed by the Cape Overberg (five nights), Cape West Coast (four nights) and Cape Winelands (three nights). 32
  • 33. Main purpose of visit and mode of transport Most (71.2%) visitors to the Western Cape travelled for holiday, followed by 4% who visited friends and relatives, 3.1% travelled for business, 2.7% were residents and 1.7% travelled to experience the food & wines. Amongst the overseas visitors, almost all (81.3%) travelled for holiday, followed by 2.4% who visited friends and relatives (VFR), 2% travelled for business and 1.9% for the food & wines. 64.7% of domestic visitors travelled for holiday, 5% visited friends and relatives,4.4% were residents who travelled about, 3.9% travelled for business and 1.5% for food & wines. Figure 32: Q4 2009 Main purpose of visit Holiday, 71.2% Business, 3.1% VFR, 4.0% Resident, 2.7% Food & Wines, 1.7% 67.6% of visitors to the Western Cape used a car as their main mode of transport and 3.8% utilised the public transport services. 75.6% of overseas visitors travelled by car, 10.1% used public transport, 1.6% travelled by bus and 1.3% by taxi. 65.2% of domestic visitors used a car as their main mode of transport. General comments about the Western Cape Most (14.8%) visitors said the Western Cape as a great destination, followed by 9.9% who complimented the helpful and friendly services obtained, 5.5% provided good comments on the tourism products and 4.3% described the destination as excellent and wonderful. 33
  • 34. Q4 2009 CAPE TOWN REGIONAL TRENDS A total of 546 responses were obtained from the Cape Town region in Q4 2009, across the months of October (45%), November (34%) and December (20.8%). The responses were received from the following Visitor Information Centres (VICs): • Waterfront Gateway (51.7%) • Somerset West (2.6%) • Muizenberg/Simonstown (23.8%) • VIC International Terminal (3.7%) • VIC Domestic Terminal (3.5%) • Kirstenbosch (3.5%) • Hout Bay (11.2%) Origin of visitors Almost all (85.2%) visitors to the Cape Town region in Q4 2009 were from overseas, followed by 8.6% who were domestic and 1.3% who originated from Africa (excluding domestic). Of the overseas visitors, 27.1% were from the UK, followed by Germany (12.6%), the Netherlands (6.9%), USA (6%), Switzerland (4.8%), France (3.1%), Australia (2.9%), Sweden (2.4%) and Belgium (2%). Figure 33: Q4 2009 Origin of Overseas Visitors 30.0% 27.1% 25.0% % of Overseas Visitors 20.0% 15.0% 12.6% 10.0% 6.9% 6.0% 5.0% 4.8% 3.1% 2.9% 2.4% 2.0% 0.0% Of the domestic visitors, 1.3% were from Gauteng, 0.7% from KwaZulu-Natal and 0.4% each respectively from the Western Cape and Free State. 34
  • 35. Figure 34: Q4 2009 Domestic visitors’ province of origin 1.4% 1.3% 1.2% % of Domestic Visitors 1.0% 0.8% 0.7% 0.6% 0.4% 0.4% 0.4% 0.2% 0.0% Gauteng KwaZulu-Natal Western Cape Free State Travel group size and length of stay The overall average as well as most common travel group size to the Cape Town region was two. 17.2% of visitors travelled alone, 61.2% travelled in pairs, 8.2% in threes and 7.1% in fours. The overall average as well as most common travel group size amongst the overseas visitors was two. 16.3% of overseas visitors travelled alone, 64.4% in pairs, 7.9% in threes and 6.4% in fours. Figure 35: Q4 2009 Travel group size by origin region 70.0% 64.4% 60.0% 50.0% % of Visitors 40.0% 36.2% 30.0% 27.7% 20.0% 16.3% 12.8% 12.8% 7.9% 10.0% 6.4% 0.0% Overseas Domestic Alone Twos Threes Fours Likewise to the overseas visitors, the overall as well as most common travel group size amongst the domestic visitors was two. 36.2% of the overseas visitors travelled in pairs, followed by 27.7% who travelled alone and 12.8% each respectively travelled in groups of threes and fours. 35
  • 36. Figure 36: Q4 2009 Length of stay by origin region 30.0% 25.0% 20.0% % of visitors 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% Overseas Domestic 1 night 9.9% 19.1% 2 nights 12.2% 25.5% 3 nights 8.4% 14.9% 4 nights 11.8% 14.9% 5 nights 12.2% 4.3% Almost all (92.9%) visitors to the Cape Town region indicated that they stayed overnight. The overall average length of stay was ten nights and the most common was two nights. 12.1% of visitors stayed for one night, 13% for two nights, 9.1% for three nights, 11.9% for four nights and 11% stayed for five nights. Of the overseas visitors, the overall average length of stay was eleven nights and the most common was two nights. 94.4% of overseas visitors stayed overnight, 9.9% stayed for one night, 8.4% for three nights, 11.8% for four nights and 12.2% each respectively stayed for two and five nights. Amongst the domestic visitors, the overall average length of stay was four nights and the most common was two nights. 91.5% of domestic visitors stayed overnight, 19.1% stayed for one night, 25.5% for two nights, 14.9% for three nights and four nights (each respectively) and 4.3% stayed for five nights. Main purpose of visit and mode of transport The main purpose of visit amongst visitors to Cape Town was for holiday (81.2%), followed by business (7.1%), honeymoon (1.5%) and 1.1% travelled for education. 36
  • 37. Of the overseas visitors, most (86.3%) travelled for holiday, followed by 6% who travelled for business and 1.5% for honeymoon. 51.1% of domestic visitors travelled for holiday and 21.3% for business. Figure 37: Q4 2009 Main purpose of visit Holiday, 81.2% Business, 7.1% Honeymoon, Education, 1.1% 1.5% 43.5% visitors used a car as their main mode of transport, followed by public transport (39.9%), and 3.3% each respectively used taxi and shuttle services. 44.8% of overseas visitors utilised public transport services, followed by 41.6% who travelled by car, 3.4% by taxi and 3% used shuttle services. Amongst the domestic visitors, 68.1% travelled by car, 10.6% used public transport, 4.3% used shuttle services and 2.1% travelled by taxi. Information sources and average daily budget 27.6% visitors heard of the destination from friends and relatives, 8.8% obtained information online, 4.9% from the media, 3.1% from the Visitor Information Centres, 1.6% have visited the destination on a previous occasion, 0.7% were residents who travelled about and 0.5% each respectively heard of the destination from schools and travel books. The average daily budget of visitors to the Cape Town region was R1 321.13 and the most common was R1 000.00. 37
  • 38. Figure 38: Q4 2009 Main source of information Travel Books 0.5% School 0.5% Resident 0.7% Experience (Have been here before) 1.6% VICs 3.1% Media 4.9% Online 8.8% Friends & Relatives 27.6% 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% General comments about Cape Town Of those who responded, 26% indicated that they would like to hear about Cape Town and the Western Cape again and 16.6% said they would prefer not to. When asked whether they would be returning to the destination, 45.3% confirmed they would and 23.6% said they might visit again. Visitors were also granted the opportunity to provide overall comments on their experience within the region; 16.1% described the Cape Town region as a great destination, 7.3% complimented the helpful and friendly service obtained from the tourism offices, 6% provided good comments about the tourism products and 5.1% had just arrived and were unable to provide conclusive comments on their overall experience. Q4 2009 CAPE TOWN LODGING STATISTICS In Q4 2009, 240 responses were received from the Cape Town region across the months of October (32.9%), November (34.2%) and December (32.9%). The establishments represented were from the following Cape Town sub-regions: Central (24.2%), North East (25%), South (25%) and Central Coastal (25.8%). The participating lodging establishments included hotels (25%), guest houses (25%), B&B’s (25%) and self catering (24.6%). In the figure below, star grading by participating lodging establishments is illustrated. 38
  • 39. Figure 39: Star grading of participating lodging establishments 1‐Star, 0.4% 5‐Star, 12.1% 3‐Star, 16.7% 4‐Star, 29.2% The summary for Q4 2009 lodging statistics for Cape Town region is as follows: • Average occupancy rate: 59.7% • Average room rate achieved: R832.07 • RevPAR: R496.50 • Forward booking (October): 53% • Forward booking (November): 49.8% • Forward booking (December): 44.8% In the table below, Cape Town lodging statistics by month is illustrated. December received the highest occupancy rate (66%) as well as the highest room rate (R901.41) in Q4 2009. Table 6: Q4 2009 Cape Town lodging statistics by month Month Occupancy rate (%) Average room rate ® October 53.0 754.34 November 61.6 839.23 December 66.0 901.41 In the table below, lodging statistics by Cape Town sub-regions are illustrated. Cape Town Central enjoyed the highest occupancy rate (63.4%), closely followed by the Central Coastal sub- region, with an occupancy rate of 62.9%. Cape Town South achieved the highest Average room rate of R1006.68, followed by Cape Town Central (R993.88). 39
  • 40. Table 7: Q4 2009 Lodging statistics by Cape Town region Cape Town % Average RevPAR % Forward % Forward % Forward region Occupancy room ® booking 1 booking 2 booking 3 rate ® month months months Central 63.4 993.88 629.72 60.81 50.89 41.90 North East 54.7 474.08 259.42 47.57 45.07 44.28 South 59.1 1 006.68 594.65 57.37 57.60 54.49 Central Coastal 62.9 886.00 557.29 47.27 46.55 34.40 (*December as benchmark month) In the table below, the Q4 2009 lodging statistics are illustrated by category of establishment. Hotels enjoyed the highest occupancy rate (67.7%), followed by guest houses (61%), self catering (54.6%) and B&Bs (53.9%). The hotels also achieved the highest average room rate (R1498.54), followed by guest houses (R688.51), self catering (R645.09) and B&Bs (R511.78). Table 8: Lodging statistics by category of establishment Category % Average RevPAR ® % Forward % Forward % Forward Occupancy room rate booking 1 booking 2 booking 3 ® month months months Hotel 67.7 1 498.54 1 014.66 61.44 49.42 43.85 Guest 61.0 688.51 420.27 53.75 50.43 47.77 house B&B 53.9 511.78 275.59 45.02 49.28 43.26 Self 54.6 645.09 352.41 51.21 48.93 44.52 catering (*December as benchmark month) The table below demonstrates the lodging statistics by Cape Town sub-regions and category of establishment. It is found that hotels in Central Coastal enjoyed the highest occupancy rate (73.8%), closely followed by the guest houses in Central Coastal, with an occupancy rate of 71.5%. Hotels in Cape Town South achieved the highest average room rate (R1936.40), followed by hotels in Central Coastal (R1791.93) and hotels in Cape Town Central (R1658.33). 40
  • 41. Table 9: Lodging statistics by Cape Town region and category of establishment Category Cape Town Central North East South Central Coastal / Region % Average % Average % Average % Average Occupancy room rate Occupancy room rate Occupancy room rate ® Occupanc room rate ® ® y ® Hotel 68.8 1 658.33 61.9 659.00 66.7 1 936.40 73.8 1 791.93 Guest 60.8 739.62 55.1 433.33 58.1 924.67 71.5 661.43 house B&B 60.0 872.50 53.2 316.00 58.0 512.67 46.9 370.00 Self 63.8 697.00 48.7 488.00 51.4 653.00 57.6 777.31 catering Booking Method 29.2% of bookings were made via telephone, e-mail and web, followed by 22.5% of visitors who booked through telephone and e-mail. The single most common booking method used was telephone (18.8%), followed by web (12.5%) and e-mail (3.3%). 6.3% utilised e-mail and web, 3.3% telephone and web, and 2.5% booked through word of mouth. Respondents were also asked to indicate whether they have booked through other methods, 36.7% indicated that they have made use of other booking methods and 62.1% said they have not. Figure 40: Q4 2009 Method through which bulk of bookings were received Word of mouth 2.5% All three methods 29.2% Telephone and web 3.3% E-mail and web 6.3% Telephone and e-mail 22.5% Web 12.5% E-mail 3.3% Telephone 18.8% 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 35.0% 41
  • 42. Q4 2009 CAPE WINELANDS REGIONAL TRENDS In Q4 2009, a total of 1 813 responses were obtained from the Cape Winelands region, and were received across the months of October (31.4%), November (30.4%) and December (38.2%). The participating towns in the region were: • Tulbagh (47.8%) • Ceres (22.4%) • Montagu (11.7%) • Stellenbosch (10.9%) • Worcester (4%) • Paarl (3.2%) Origin of visitors The majority (53.2%) of visitors to the Cape Winelands region were from overseas, closely followed by 44.1% who were domestic and 1.2% who originated from Africa (excluding domestic). Of the overseas visitors, most (14.1%) were from the UK, followed by Germany (13.1%), The Netherlands (7.5%), Switzerland (2.6%), Belgium (2.4%), France (2.2%) and 2% each respectively originated from the USA and Sweden. Figure 41: Q4 2009 % of visitors by town in the Cape Winelands region 100.0% 91.9% 90.0% 81.0% 80.0% 79.7% 70.8% 70.0% % of visitors 60.6% 60.0% 56.3% 50.0% 41.2% 38.9% 40.0% 30.0% 22.2% 20.0% 15.6% 5.6% 10.3% 10.0% 1.6% 0.2% 0.5% 1.0% 1.4% 3.4% 0.0% Tulbagh Ceres Montagu Stellenbosch Worcester Paarl Overseas Domestic Africa (excl domestic) As seen in the figure above, the overseas visitors dominated across most of the Cape Winelands towns and the domestic visitors dominated in the towns of Tulbagh and Ceres. Likewise to the previous quarter, Stellenbosch enjoyed the highest (91.9%) percentage of overseas visitors, 42
  • 43. followed by Paarl (81%) and Montagu (79.7%). Ceres received the highest (60.6%) percentage of domestic visitors, followed by Tulbagh (56.3%) and Worcester (22.2%). Paarl received the most (3.4%) visitors originating from Africa (excluding domestic), followed by Tulbagh (1.6%) and Worcester (1.4%). Table 10: Q4 2009 Top three source countries in each participating town in the Cape Winelands Rank/ Tulbagh Ceres Montagu Stellenbosch Worcester Paarl Town 1 South Africa South Africa UK (22.2%) UK (21.7%) UK (29.2%) Germany (56.3%) (60.6%) (24.1%) 2 Germany UK (8.4%) Germany Germany South Africa UK (22.4%) (12.5%) (16.5%) (21.2%) (22.2%) 3 UK (11.3%) Germany South Africa Switzerland Germany, South Africa (7.6%) (15.6%) (8.1%) The (10.3%) Netherlands (11.1%) As seen above, South Africa, the UK and Germany dominate as the top source countries across the participating towns in the Cape Winelands. Stellenbosch also received visitors from Switzerland and Worcester received visitors from the Netherlands. Figure 42: Q4 2009 % of Domestic visitors to the Cape Winelands 25.0% 21.4% 20.0% % of domestic visitors 15.0% 10.0% 9.1% 5.0% 2.3% 1.2% 1.0% 0.9% 0.6% 0.5% 0.2% 0.0% Of the domestic visitors, 21.4% originated from the Western Cape, followed by Gauteng (9.1%), KwaZulu-Natal (2.3%), Eastern Cape (1.2%), Free State (1.0%), Mpumalanga (0.9%), North West (0.6%), Limpopo (0.5%) and the Northern Cape (0.2%). 43
  • 44. Table 11: Q4 2009 Top three domestic visitors’ province of origin by participating Cape Winelands towns Rank/ Tulbagh Ceres Montagu Stellenbosch Worcester Paarl Town 1 Western Cape Western Cape Western Cape Western Cape Western Gauteng (28.7%) (28.3%) (8.0%) (1.5%) Cape, (5.2%) Gauteng (5.6%) 2 Gauteng Gauteng Gauteng Gauteng, Eastern KZN (3.4%) (11.3%) (12.8%) (3.3%) Limpopo Cape (1.4%) (0.5%) 3 KZN (2.1%) KZN (4.2%) KZN (1.9%) - - - The table above illustrates the top three provinces from which visitors to participating towns in the Cape Winelands originated. Western Cape, Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal were the top amongst the participating provinces. The town of Stellenbosch also received visitors from Limpopo and Worcester received visitors from the Eastern Cape. Travel group size and length of stay The overall average travel group size of visitors to the Cape Winelands region was three and the most common group size was two. 6.7% travelled alone, 58.5% travelled in pairs, 10.8% travelled in groups of threes and 14% in groups of fours. Of the overseas visitors, the overall average travel group size was three and the most common was two. 6.8% travelled alone, 66.1% travelled in pairs, 8.2% in groups of threes and 10.5% in fours. Similar to the overseas visitors, the overall average travel group size of the domestic visitors was three and the most common was two. 6.1% of domestic visitors travelled alone, 50% travelled in pairs, 13.9% in threes and 18.4% in fours. 44
  • 45. Figure 43: Q4 2009 Travel group size by region of origin 70.0% 66.1% 60.0% 50.0% 50.0% % of visitors 40.0% 30.0% 18.4% 20.0% 13.9% 8.2% 10.5% 10.0% 6.8% 6.1% 0.0% Overseas Domestic Alone Twos Threes Fours Of the total number of respondents, 74.4% indicated that they stayed overnight in the Cape Winelands region. The overall average length of stay amongst visitors to the Cape Winelands region was three and the most common was one night. 43.7% of visitors stayed for one night, followed by 15.4% who stayed for two nights, 4.9% for three nights, 2.9% for four nights and 2% stayed for five nights. Figure 44: Q4 2009 Length of stay by region of origin 50.0% 45.0% 40.0% 35.0% % of visitors 30.0% 25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% Overseas Domestic 1 night 44.0% 44.0% 2 nights 18.7% 12.0% 3 nights 4.5% 5.5% 4 nights 2.4% 3.6% 5 nights 1.6% 2.3% 45
  • 46. The overall average length of stay amongst the overseas visitors was three nights and the most common was one night. 75.8% of overseas visitors indicated that they stayed overnight, 44% stayed for one night, 18.7% for two nights, 4.5% for three nights, 2.4% for four nights and 1.6% for five nights. 73.5% of the domestic visitors indicated that they stayed overnight. The overall average length of stay was four nights and the most common was one night. 44% of domestic visitors stayed for one night, 12% for two nights, 5.5% for three nights, 3.6% for four nights and 2.3% for five nights. Table 12: Q4 2009 Average group size and average length of stay (nights) in the Cape Winelands Town Average group size Average length of stay Overseas Domestic All Overseas Domestic All Tulbagh 2.8 3.0 2.9 3.4 2.5 2.8 Ceres 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.8 2.7 3.1 Montagu 2.1 2.7 2.2 2.1 7.7 3.0 Stellenbosch 3.0 2.6 3.0 2.7 50.4 5.7 Worcester 3.0 2.4 2.9 1.8 1.6 1.8 Paarl 2.5 2.7 2.5 5.1 1.5 4.4 The majority of visitors to the participating Cape Winelands towns travelled in groups of twos and threes. Stellenbosch enjoyed the highest (six nights) average length of stay, followed by Paarl (four nights). The significant (50.4) average length of stay of the domestic visitors to the town of Stellenbosch was due to the small percentage (5.6%) of domestic visitors who stayed for longer periods within the region. 46
  • 47. Main purpose of visit and mode of transport The majority (79.6%) of visitors to the Cape Winelands region travelled for holiday, followed by 4.1% who visited friends and relatives, 2.9% travelled for the food and wines, 2% attended weddings and 1.6% travelled for business. 83.8% of overseas visitors travelled for holiday, 3.1% enjoyed the food and wines and 2.8% visited friends and relatives. Amongst the domestic visitors, 75.5% travelled for holiday, 5.8% visited friends and relatives and 3% attended weddings. The majority of visitors to the respective Cape Winelands towns travelled for holiday. Worcester and Tulbagh enjoyed the highest percentage of visitors who travelled to their friends and relatives, while Paarl received 12.1% of visitors who travelled to experience the food and wines. Figure 45: Q4 2009 Main purpose of visit Business, 1.6% Holiday, 79.6% VFR, 4.1% Food & Wines, 2.9% Wedding, 2.0% 47
  • 48. Table 13: Q4 2009 Purpose of visit in the Cape Winelands Town/Purpose of visit Holiday Business VFR Food & Wines Tulbagh 77.7 0.8 6.5 3.0 Ceres 78.3 2.7 2.0 0.2 Montagu 85.8 2.4 1.4 1.9 Stellenbosch 86.4 1.0 0.5 6.6 Worcester 81.9 2.8 6.9 2.8 Paarl 69.0 3.4 3.4 12.1 92.5% of visitors to the Cape Winelands region used a car as their main mode of transport, followed by 1.2% who travelled by bus. Of the overseas visitors, 91.5% travelled by car and 2.1% by bus. Amongst the domestic visitors, 94.5% used a car and 1% travelled by taxi. General comments Visitors were asked to provide overall comments about the destination. 29.4% described the Cape Winelands as a great destination, 19% complimented the helpful and friendly services obtained from the tourism offices, 7.9% provided positive comments about the tourism products and 6.6% described the destination as excellent. 48
  • 49. Q4 2009 CAPE GARDEN ROUTE & KLEIN KAROO REGIONAL TRENDS There were a total of 966 responses received in Q4 2009 from the Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo region. Responses were obtained in the months of October (35.1%), November (23.9%) and December (41%) from the following towns: De Rust (15.8%), George (75.9%) and Tsitsikamma (8.3%). Origin of visitors Of the visitors to the Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo region, 8.7% were from overseas, 79% were domestic and 0.2% from Africa, excluding domestic. Of the overseas visitors, 2.6% were from Germany, 2.2% from the UK, 1.2% from the Netherlands, 0.4% (each respectively) from Belgium, Canada and Austria. Figure 46: Q4 2009 Origin of overseas visitors 3.0% 2.6% 2.5% 2.2% 2.0% % of visitors 1.5% 1.2% 1.0% 0.5% 0.4% 0.4% 0.4% 0.2% 0.0% UK Germany USA The  Belgium Canada Austria Netherlands Of the domestic visitors, 17.9% originated from the Western Cape, followed by those from Gauteng (3.9%), Eastern Cape (1.8%), KwaZulu-Natal (1.1%), Free State and North West (0.7% each respectively), Mpumalanga (0.4%), Limpopo and Northern Cape (0.2% each respectively). 49
  • 50. Figure 47: Q4 2009 Domestic visitors’ province of origin 0.2% 0.7% 0.2% 0.7% 0.4% 3.9% 1.1% Gauteng 1.8% Western Cape Eastern Cape KZN Mpumalanga Limpopo Free State Northern Cape North West 17.9% As seen in the figure below, the domestic visitors dominated across all participating Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo towns. The town of George received the most (82%) domestic visitors, followed by Tsitsikamma (71.3%) and De Rust (68.6%). Tsitsikamma received the most (28.7%) overseas visitors, closely followed by De Rust (28.1%). George received 2.5% overseas visitors. Figure 48: Q4 2009 Performance of participating towns in drawing overseas and domestic visitors Overseas Domestic 90.0% 82.0% 80.0% 71.3% 68.6% 70.0% 60.0% % of visitors 50.0% 40.0% 28.1% 28.7% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 2.5% 0.0% De Rust George Tsitsikamma 50
  • 51. Travel group size and length of stay In Q4 2009 the overall average as well as most common travel group size of visitors was two. 37.5% of visitors to the Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo region travelled alone, followed by 39.8% who travelled in pairs, 8.2% in threes and 6.6% in fours. Of the overseas visitors, the overall average travel group size was six and the most common was two. 9.5% travelled alone, 54.8% travelled in pairs, 14.3% in threes and 7.1% in fours. Amongst the domestic visitors, the overall average travel group size was two and the most common was one. 43.3% of the domestic visitors travelled alone, followed by 35.3% who travelled in pairs, 7.6% in threes and 5.8% in fours. Figure 49: Q4 2009 Travel group size by origin region of visitor 60.0% 54.8% 50.0% 43.3% 40.0% % of visitors 35.3% 30.0% 20.0% 14.3% 9.5% 7.1% 7.6% 10.0% 5.8% 0.0% Overseas Domestic Alone Twos Threes Fours Of the visitors to the Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo region, 63.6% indicated that they stayed overnight. The overall average length of stay was two nights and the most common was one night. Most (53.2%) visitors stayed for one night, followed by 4.6% who stayed for two nights and 1.8% stayed for three nights. The overall average length of stay of the overseas visitors was two nights and the most common was one night. 72.6% of the overseas visitors stayed overnight, 48.8% stayed for one night, 16.7% stayed for two nights and 2.4% for three nights. 51
  • 52. Of the domestic visitors, 59% indicated that they stayed overnight. The overall average length of stay of the domestic visitors was two nights and the most common was one night. 49.1% stayed for one night, 3.4% stayed for two nights and 2% for three nights. Figure 50: Q4 2009 Average length of stay by region of origin 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% % of visitors 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Overseas Domestic 1 night 48.8% 49.1% 2 nights 16.7% 3.4% 3 nights 2.4% 2.0% Table 14: Q4 2009 Average group size and length of stay (nights) by participating Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo region towns Town Average group size Average length of stay (nights) Overseas Domestic All Overseas Domestic All De Rust 8.2 2.5 4.3 2.4 1.6 1.8 George 2.5 1.7 1.8 1.0 1.3 1.2 Tsitsikamma 3.2 4.7 4.3 2.7 7.8 6.2 The average group size and length of stay is illustrated by region of origin in the table illustrated above. The towns of De Rust and George both received an average travel group size of four and most of the visitors to George travelled in pairs. Tsitsikamma (six nights) enjoyed the highest average length of stay, followed by De Rust (two nights) and George (one night). 52
  • 53. Main purpose of visit and mode of transport The majority (78.4%) of visitors to the Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo region travelled for holiday, followed by 12.2% who were residents travelling about, 4% travelled predominantly for business and 2% visited friends and relatives. Of the overseas visitors, 84.5% travelled for holiday, followed by 2.4% (each respectively) who travelled for business and visited friends and family. 74.6% of domestic visitors travelled for holiday, 4.7% for business, 2.2% visited friends and family and 15.5% consisted of domestic visitors were residents. Figure 51: Q4 2009 Main purpose of visit Holiday, 78.4% Business, 4.0% VFR, 2.0% Resident, 12.2% 20.7% of visitors to the Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo region used a car as their main mode of transport, followed by 1.2% who travelled by bus. Of the overseas visitors, 63.1% travelled by car, 6% by bus and 2.4% used a bike as their main mode of transport. 18.7% of the domestic visitors travelled by car and 1% by bike. General comments Visitors were given the opportunity to provide overall comments on their experience in the Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo region. 5.8% of visitors described the region as a great destination, followed by 5.1% who provided positive comments about the tourism products, 4.1% complimented the friendly and helpful service obtained from the respective tourism offices and 2.7% described the destination as excellent and wonderful. 53
  • 54. Q4 2009 CAPE OVERBERG REGIONAL TRENDS There were a total of 633 responses received from the Cape Overberg region in Q4 2009. Responses were received from Stanford (79.9%), Gansbaai (5.7%) and Caledon (14.4%), across the following months: • October (89.6%) • November (8.4%) • December (2.1%) Origin of visitors Of the visitors to the Cape Overberg region in Q4 2009, 89.4% were from overseas, 78.8% were domestic and 0.2% from Africa (excluding domestic). Of the overseas visitors, 8.4% originated from the UK, 4.6% from Germany, 2.4% from USA and the Netherlands and 0.8% from France. 0.6% of overseas visitors did not indicate their origin. Figure 52: Q4 2009 Origin of overseas visitors 9.0% 8.4% 8.0% 7.0% 6.0% % of visitors 5.0% 4.6% 4.0% 3.0% 2.4% 2.4% 2.0% 0.8% 0.6% 1.0% 0.0% UK Germany USA The  France Other Netherlands The majority of domestic visitors originated from the Western Cape (37.9%), followed by those from Gauteng (0.8%) and the Eastern Cape (0.2%). 54
  • 55. Figure 53: Region of origin by participating Cape Overberg region 90.0% 84.6% 80.0% 70.0% 59.3% 60.0% 50.0% 50.0% 47.2% 37.4% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 15.2% 10.0% 2.8% 3.3% 0.2% 0.0% Stanford Gansbaai Caledon Overseas Domestic Africa, excl domestic In the figure above, the region of origin by participating Cape Overberg town is illustrated. Stanford and Caledon received more domestic than overseas visitors, where Gansbaai received more overseas visitors than domestic. Travel group size and length of stay In the Cape Overberg region in Q4 2009, the overall average travel group size was two and the most common travel group size was one. 46.8% of visitors to the region travelled alone, 41.1% in pairs, 4.4% in threes and 5.4% in fours. The average and most common overseas travel group size was two. 68.2% travelled in pairs, 14% alone, 7.8% in threes and 7% in fours. The average domestic travel group size was two and the most common was one. 55.7% of domestic visitors travelled alone, 33.7% in pairs, 3.6% in threes and 5% in fours. When asking whether visitors would stay overnight, 8.5% indicated that they would, the rest were day visitors. The overall average length of stay was five nights and the most common was one night. 2.7% of visitors to the region spend one night in the region, followed by those who stayed for two nights (2.5%), three nights (0.9%) and 14 nights (0.5%). 55
  • 56. Figure 15: Q4 2009 Average travel group size and length of stay (nights) by participating Cape Overberg towns Town Average group size Average length of stay (nights) Overseas Domestic All Overseas Domestic All Stanford 2.12 1.57 1.65 - 1.73 1.73 Gansbaai 2.33 3.18 2.72 2.43 11.43 6.9 Caledon 2.09 1.79 1.91 1.75 3.29 2.73 Of the overseas visitors, 14% stayed overnight in the Cape Overberg region in Q4 2009 and 86% were day visitors. The average length of stay of overseas visitors was two nights and the most common was one night in the region. 5.4% stayed for one night, 3.9% for two nights, 3.1% for three nights and 0.8% stayed for four and eight nights (each respectively). Of the domestic visitors to the Cape Overberg region, 7% stayed overnight. The average length of stay was six nights and the most common was two nights spent in the region. 2% stayed for one night, 2.2% for two nights and 0.6% for 14 nights. Purpose of visit and mode of transport The main purpose of visit to the Cape Overberg region in Q4 2009 was holiday (21.3%), visiting friends and relatives (14.7%), business and education (0.3% each respectively) and weddings (0.2%). Of the overseas visitors, 38.8% visited the region for holiday, followed by those who came to visit friends and relatives (12.4%) and education (1.6%). Of the domestic visitors, 16.2% visited the region for holiday, followed by those who came to visit friends and relatives (15.4%), business (0.4%) and weddings (0.2%). 56
  • 57. Figure 54: Q4 2009 Main purpose of visit Education, 0.3% Wedding, 0.2% VFR, 14.7% Holiday, 21.3% Business, 0.3% 28.6% of visitors travelling in the Cape Overberg region in Q4 2009 used a car as main mode of transport, followed by those who travelled by bus (0.2%). 38.8% of overseas visitors and 25.7% of domestic visitors travelled by car. General comments When visitors were given the opportunity to provide feedback with regard to their experience in the Cape Overberg region, 1.6% indicated that it was a great destination and 1.3% provided positive comments on the tourism products in the region. 57
  • 58. Q4 2009 CAPE CENTRAL KAROO REGIONAL TRENDS There were a total of 334 responses received from the Cape Central Karoo region in Q4 2009 from towns: Prince Albert (1.5%), Laingsburg (31.7%) and Beaufort West (66.8%) across the months of October (27.8%), November (34.4%) and December (37.7%). Origin of visitors 25.4% of visitors to the Cape Central Karoo region were from overseas, 72.5% were domestic and 1.2% from Africa (excluding domestic). Of the overseas visitors, 6.3% were from Germany, 5.7% were from the UK, 5.4% were from the Netherlands, 1.2% from the USA and 0.9% (each respectively) from France, Italy and Belgium. Figure 55: Origin of overseas visitors to the Cape Central Karoo region 7.0% 6.3% 6.0% 5.7% 5.4% 5.0% % of visitors 4.0% 3.0% 2.0% 1.2% 0.9% 0.9% 0.9% 1.0% 0.0% Germany UK The  USA France Italy Belgium Netherlands In the below figure the origin region by participating Cape Central Karoo towns are illustrated. Laingsburg and Beaufort West received more domestic visitors than overseas visitors. On the other hand, Prince Albert received more overseas visitors than domestic and no visitors from Africa (excluding domestic). 58
  • 59. Figure 56: Q4 2009 Origin region by participating Cape Central Karoo towns Overseas Domestic Africa, excl domestic 100.0% 89.6% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 65.0% 60.0% % of visitors 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 40.0% 33.2% 30.0% 20.0% 7.5% 10.0% 0.9% 1.3% 0.0% Prince Albert Laingsburg Beaufort West Of the domestic visitors in the Cape Central Karoo region in Q4 2009, 19.5% were from Gauteng, followed by those from the Western Cape (18.9%), Eastern Cape (3.3%), Northern Cape (2.7%), Mpumalanga (2.4%), North West (2.1%), KwaZulu-Natal and Limpopo (1.5% each respectively) and the Free State (0.6%). Figure 57: Q4 2009 Origin of domestic visitors to the Cape Central Karoo region 25.0% 19.5% 18.6% 20.0% % of visitors 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 3.3% 2.7% 2.4% 2.1% 1.5% 1.5% 0.6% 0.0% 59
  • 60. Group size and length of stay In the Cape Central Karoo region, the overall average travel group size was three and the most common was two. 13.2% travelled alone, 52.7% in pairs, 10.2% in threes, 13.5% in fours, 5.4% in fives and 1.5% in sixes. The average and most common overseas travel group size was two. 12.9% of overseas visitors travelled alone, 62.4% in pairs, 8.2% in threes, 9.4% in fours and 2.4% in fives. The average domestic travel group size was three and the most common was two. 13.6% of domestic visitors travelled alone, 50% in pairs, 9.9% in threes, 15.3% in fours, 6.2% in fives and 1.7% in sixes. Figure 58: Q4 2009 Travel group size by origin of visitor Overseas Domestic 70.0% 62.4% 60.0% 50.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 13.6% 20.0% 15.3% 12.9% 8.2%9.9% 9.4% 6.2% 10.0% 2.4% 1.2%1.7% 0.0% Alone Twos Threes Fours Fives Sixes When asking whether they stayed overnight, 59.6% of visitors to the Cape Central Karoo region indicated that they had indeed stayed overnight in the region. 31.1% stayed for one night, 14.1% for two nights, 7.8% for three nights, 2.4% for four nights and 1.5% for five nights. 76.5% of overseas visitors stayed overnight in the region. 38.8% of overseas visitors stayed for one night, 27.1% for two nights, 9.4% for three nights and 1.2% for five nights. Of the domestic visitors, 54.1% stayed overnight in the region. 28.1% of domestic visitors stayed for one night, 9.9% for two nights, 7.4% for three nights, 3.3% for four nights and 1.7% for five nights. 60
  • 61. Amongst the participating Cape Central Karoo towns, the average length of stay was three nights in Prince Albert and two nights in Laingsburg as well as Beaufort West. The most common length of stay for Prince Albert and Beaufort West was one night and for Laingsburg it was three nights. Main purpose of visit and mode of transport The main purpose of visiting the Cape Central Karoo region in Q4 2009 was for holiday (40.1%), followed by those who came for business (4.8%), visiting friends and relatives (3.6%) as well as food & wines, events/conventions, religion and weddings (0.3% each respectively). Figure 59: Q4 2009 Main purpose of visit Holiday, 40.1% Weddings, 0.3% Religion,  0.3% Events/ Conventions,  Food &  VFR, 3.6% Business, 4.8% 0.3% Wine, 0.3% Of the domestic visitors, 29.3% visited the region for holiday, followed by 6.6% who came for business and 3.7% visited friends and relatives. Of the overseas visitors, 74.1% came for holiday, followed by those who visited friends and relatives (2.4%) and 1.2% attended weddings. Of the travellers visiting the Cape Central Karoo region, 68.9% travelled by car and 1.2% (each respectively) travelled by bus and motorcycle. 83.5% of the overseas visitors and 64% of the domestic visitors travelled by car. General comments Given the opportunity to provide feedback, 31.4% said that they received excellent service in the region and enjoyed the friendliness of the host community. 20.7% indicated that the Cape Central Karoo region is a great destination and 13.2% provided positive feedback of the region’s tourism products. 61
  • 62. Q4 2009 CAPE WEST COAST REGIONAL TRENDS There was a total of 1 593 responses obtained from the Cape West Coast region in Q4 2009. These responses were obtained over the months of October (34.8%), November (27.4%) and December (37.9%). The participating towns in the region were: • Velddrif (4.6%) • Porterville (3.6%) • Piketberg (2.8%) • Langebaan (14.9%) • Vredenburg (2.4%) • Hopefield (5.2%) • Saldanha (11.6%) • Paternoster (2.1%) • Malmesbury (20.7%) • Yzerfontein (2.9%) • Darling (26.2%) • Vanrhynsdorp (3.0%) Origin of visitors The majority (74.1%) of visitors to the Cape Winelands region were domestic, followed by 23.6% who were from overseas and 1.4% originated from Africa (excluding domestic). Of the overseas visitors, most (8%) were from the UK, followed by Germany (7%), the Netherlands (2.6%), Sweden (0.8%) and the USA (0.7%). Figure 60: Q4 2009 Origin of overseas visitors 9.0% 8.0% 8.0% 7.0% 7.0% % of overseas visitors 6.0% 5.0% 4.0% 3.0% 2.6% 2.0% 1.0% 0.8% 0.7% 0.0% UK Germany The Netherlands Sweden USA 62
  • 63. Table 16: Q4 2009 Origin region by participating West Coast towns Town Overseas Domestic Velddrif 12.2% 86.5% Porterville 22.8% 73.7% Piketberg 11.4% 88.6% Langebaan 52.9% 46.2% Vredenburg 23.7% 73.7% Hopefield 4.8% 92.8% Saldanha 9.8% 84.8% Paternoster 67.6% 29.4% Malmesbury 5.5% 94.5% Yzerfontein 91.3% - Darling 23.5% 74.1% Vanrhynsdorp 22.9% 70.8% As illustrated in the table above, the domestic visitors have consistently dominated across the participating Cape West Coast towns except for Yzerfontein, which only recorded overseas visitors for the period. Malmesbury (94.5%) and Hopefield (92.8%) received the highest percentage of domestic visitors, followed by Piketberg (88.6%) and Velddrif (86.5%). Yzerfontein received the most (91.3%) overseas visitors, followed by Paternoster (67.6%) and Langebaan (52.9%). Figure 61: Q4 2009 Domestic visitor province of origin North West 0.6% Limpopo 0.6% Free State 1.5% Mpumalanga 1.8% Eastern Cape 1.8% Northern Cape 1.9% KwaZulu-Natal 2.7% Gauteng 11.9% 47.2% Western Cape 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 63
  • 64. Of the domestic visitors, 47.2% were from the Western Cape, followed by Gauteng (11.9%), KwaZulu-Natal (2.7%), Northern Cape (1.9%), 1.8% each respectively from the Eastern Cape and Mpumalanga, 1.5% from Free State, 0.6% from Limpopo and North West (each respectively). Travel group size and length of stay The overall average travel group size of visitors to the Cape West Coast region was three and the most common was two. 23.7% of visitors travelled alone, 41.7% travelled in pairs, 10.5% in groups of threes and 10.9% in fours. Amongst the overseas visitors, the overall average travel group size was three and the most common was two. 15.2% of overseas visitors travelled alone, 55.6% travelled in pairs, 11.2% in groups of threes and 9.8% in fours. Likewise to the overseas visitors, the overall average travel group size of the domestic visitors was three and the most common was two. 26.4% of the domestic visitors travelled alone, 37.6% in pairs, 10.3% in groups of threes and 10.8% in fours. Figure 62: Q4 2009 Travel group size by origin region of visitor 60.0% 55.6% 50.0% 40.0% 37.6% % of visitors 30.0% 26.4% 20.0% 15.2% 11.2% 9.8% 10.3% 10.8% 10.0% 0.0% Overseas Domestic Alone Twos Threes Fours Of the visitors to the Cape West Coast region, 46.7% indicated that they stayed overnight in the region. The overall average length of stay amongst visitors was four nights and the most common was one night. 15.6% of visitors stayed for one night, 10.4% for two nights, 4.4% for three nights, 4% for four nights and 3.4% for five nights. 64
  • 65. Amongst the overseas visitors, the overall average length of stay was three nights and the most common was one night. 65.2% of overseas visitors stayed overnight, 22.1% stayed for one night, 16.5% for two nights, 8% for three nights, 6.6% for four nights and 6.1% for five nights. The overall average length of stay amongst the domestic visitors was four nights and the most common was one night. 40.6% of domestic visitors stayed overnight, 13.5% stayed for one night, 8.6% for two nights, 3.3% for three nights, 2.8% for four nights and 2.5% for five nights. Figure 63: Q4 2009 Average length of stay by origin region 25.0% 20.0% % of visitors 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% Overseas Domestic 1 night 22.1% 13.5% 2 nights 16.5% 8.6% 3 nights 8.0% 3.3% 4 nights 6.6% 2.8% 5 nights 6.1% 2.5% As illustrated in the table below, the overall travel group size was two and three across most of the participating Cape West Coast towns. The town of Saldanha (seven nights) enjoyed the highest average length of stay, followed by Velddrif (six nights) and Porterville (five nights). 65
  • 66. Table 17: Q4 2009 Average group size and length of stay (nights) in Cape West Coast towns Town Average group size Average length of stay (nights) Overseas Domestic All Overseas Domestic All Velddrif 2.3 3.1 3.0 2.3 6.3 5.8 Porterville 1.8 3.0 2.7 4.3 5.4 5.3 Piketberg 5.6 2.9 3.2 1.3 4.6 3.7 Langebaan 2.5 4.6 3.5 3.3 3.3 3.3 Vredenburg 2.4 3.3 3.0 2.2 1.6 1.8 Hopefield 2.3 2.2 2.2 - - - Saldanha 3.6 3.2 3.2 10.9 6.8 7.2 Paternoster 2.0 2.6 2.2 2.1 1.5 1.9 Malmesbury 2.4 1.5 1.5 2.3 3.2 3.0 Yzerfontein 2.2 - 2.2 2.5 - 2.8 Darling 2.5 2.7 2.7 3.4 1.8 2.3 Vanrhynsdorp 2.4 2.5 2.5 1.3 3.7 3.0 Main purpose of visit and mode of transport The main purpose of visiting the Cape West Coast region was for holiday (80.2%), followed by 3.8% who travelled for business, 2.7% travelled for the food and wines, and 2.2% (each respectively) visited friends and relatives and was residents who travelled about within the region. Of the overseas visitors, 84% travelled to the Cape West Coast for holiday, 2.7% for food and wines, 1.9% for business and 1.1% visited friends and relatives. Amongst the domestic visitors, 79.2% travelled for holiday, 4.4% for business, 2.7% were residents, 2.6% travelled to experience the food and wines and 2.4% visited friends and relatives. 66
  • 67. Figure 64: Q4 2009 Main purpose of visit Business, 3.8% Holiday, 80.2% VFR, 2.2% Food & Wines, 2.7% Resident, 2.2% 91.3% visitors to the Cape West Coast region utilised a car as their main mode of transport. 90.7% of overseas visitors travelled by car and 1.1% by bus. Of the domestic visitors, the majority (92.1%) travelled by car. General comments Visitors were asked to provide overall comments with regards to the destination; 7.2% described the Cape West Coast as a great destination, 3.7% conveyed the destination as excellent, 3.1% complimented the friendly and helpful services obtained from the tourism offices, 2.8% provided positive comments about the tourism products, 2.7% said they had a good experience and 1.6% expressed their thanks and appreciation. 67
  • 68. CTRU TOURISM REFERENCE PANEL The CTRU Reference Panel of experts is constituted of 174 members from different sectors of the Western Cape tourism industry, to give informed opinions on the performance and prospects of tourism in the province. The particular study with the CTRU Reference Panel was conducted in Q4 2009 to determine industry perception about tourism performance and expectations for the bumper summer season 2009/10. A short in-depth questionnaire was sent to all the panel members. These respondents represented different tourism sectors which include: tour operators (37.8%), accommodation (27%), attractions (16.2%), business tourism and transport (5.4%, each respectively) as well as academics and local/regional tourism offices and local government (2.7%, each respectively). The questionnaire was divided into two sections, the Summer Season 2009/10 and the 2010 FIFA World Cup™, reflecting on activities regarding the Final Draw as well as the mega- event. Section 1: Summer season 2009 outlook The reference panel was asked to rate their expectation for the summer season 2009/10 with regard to their representative sector as well as the destination, Cape Town and the Western Cape. Across all the representative tourism sectors, 32.4% expected that in the Summer Season 2009/10 the destination would perform the same, 27% expected it to be better, 18.9% expected it to be much better and 21.6% expected it to be worse than the Summer season of 2008. Figure 65: Rating of Summer Season 2009 destination performance Expected destination tourism performance 35.0% 32.4% 30.0% 27.0% 25.0% % of respondents 21.6% 20.0% 18.9% 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% Much better Better Same Worse 68
  • 69. When asked to rate the expectation of the tourism sector, 35.1% indicated that their sector would perform better than the previous year, 27% indicated that it will be the same, 24.3% indicated that it will be worse and 13.5% indicated that it would be much better. Figure 66: Rating of Summer Season 2009 performance by tourism sector 40.0% 35.1% 35.0% 30.0% 27.0% % of respondents 24.3% 25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 13.5% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% Much better Better Same Worse Amongst the participating tourism sectors in the tourism reference panel, most were optimistic concerning the upcoming Summer Season, a part from the lodging and tour operators/agencies who expect a somewhat worse performance compared to the last year’s Summer Season. 69
  • 70. Figure 67: Breakdown of Summer Season 2009 performance by tourism sector Much better Better Same Worse 18.0% 16.2% 16.0% 13.5% % of respondents 14.0% 12.0% 10.8% 10.8% 10.0% 8.1% 8.0% 5.4% 5.4%5.4% 6.0% 4.0% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.0% 2.0% 0.0% When asked which attractions would be predominantly visited during the Summer Season, Table Mountain, the Wine Route and the V& A Waterfront came first with 91.9%, followed by Kirstenbosch Botanical Garden (83.8%), Robben Island and Cape Point (78.4%, each respectively), Game Parks (40.5%) and museums (35.1%). 70
  • 71. Figure 68: Major Attractions expected to be visited during Summer Season 2009 Cape Point, 78.4% Table Mountain,  91.9% V&A Waterfront,  91.9% Kirstenbosch,  83.8% Museums, 35.1% Robben Island,  78.4% Game Parks, 40.5% Wine Route, 91.9% Respondents were also given the opportunity to provide other attractions that they anticipated to be visited during the Summer Season 2009 and in the below figure illustrated, it is noticed that beaches, boulders, Seal Island, township tours, Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo and the Cango Caves were expected to be popular amongst visitors to Cape Town and the Western Cape. Figure 69: Other attractions expected to be visited Cango Caves 2.7% Cape Garden Route & Klein Karoo 2.7% % of resondents Townships 2.7% Seal Island 2.7% Boulders 5.4% Beaches 5.4% 0.0% 1.0% 2.0% 3.0% 4.0% 5.0% 6.0% Outdoor/Active (73%) activities were rated as the major activity participated in by visitors to the destination, followed by gourmet delights (45.9%), cosmopolitan vibe (43.2%), eco/nature 71
  • 72. activities (37.8%), culture & heritage (29.7%) and body, mind and soul (10.8%). Respondents also mentioned that many would be participating in the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ Final Draw activities. Figure 70: Major Activities participation during Summer Season 2009 80.0% 73.0% 70.0% 60.0% % of respondents 50.0% 45.9% 43.2% 37.8% 40.0% 29.7% 30.0% 20.0% 10.8% 10.0% 0.0% The respondents were asked to rate the level of general concerns the destination might be challenged with. As illustrated in the figure above, Safety & security (83.8%) and the crime rate (78.4%) were major concerns, followed by the economic crisis (59.9%) and road works (45.9). The respondents expressed little concern regarding the Swine Flu virus (58.5%). 72
  • 73. Figure 71: General concerns concerning Summer Season 2009 No concern Neutral Major concern 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Poor  Public  communicat Economic  Safety &  Swine Flu  Sustainable  Road works Overpricing Crime Transportati ion amongst  Crisis Security virus tourism on tourism  sectors No concern 2.7% 2.7% 16.2% 21.6% 2.7% 16.2% 59.5% 37.8% 27.0% Neutral 29.7% 8.1% 29.7% 35.1% 10.8% 32.4% 21.6% 43.2% 45.9% Major concern 59.5% 83.8% 45.9% 29.7% 78.4% 35.1% 2.7% 5.4% 10.8% 73
  • 74. Section 2: 2010 FIFA World Cup™ Final Draw The second half of the questionnaire reflected on 2010 FIFA World Cup™ and the Final Draw activities taking place in the destination. The respondents were asked to provide input on whether the Final Draw would improve and create awareness with regard to certain imperatives and much needed aspects for the destination. The majority, (83.8%) indicated that the Final Draw of 2010 FIFA World Cup™ would create destination awareness, 70.3% indicated that this event would increase visitor numbers to the destination. In the figure below it is observed that the respondents were rather optimistic with regard to the Final Draw and its impact; however there are some who showed concern around the unified marketing initiatives amongst the Western Cape tourism industry. 24.3% said the event would not improve on this matter. Figure 72: Expectation for Final Draw of 2010 FIFA World Cup™ 90.0% 83.8% 80.0% 70.3% 70.0% 60.0% 51.4% 48.6% 50.0% 40.5% 40.5% 35.1% 37.8% 40.0% 32.4% 30.0% 24.3% 18.9% 24.3% 20.0% 13.5% 10.8% 8.1% 8.1% 10.0% 2.7% 0.0% Destination  Increased visitor  Unified  Involvement of  Increase leisure  Inspire and  awareness numbers to  marketing  local businesses return visits increase business  destination initiatives  return visits amongst the  Western Cape  tourism Industry Yes No Maybe 74
  • 75. Final Draw of 2010 FIFA World Cup™ Visitor Profile The respondents were asked to provide their opinions on the expected profile of the Final Draw visitors. The main focus was on the average spend, length of stay and repeat visits. The majority (62.2%) of respondents indicated that spend would increase, followed by 21.6% who thought it might increase and 10.8% who felt that visitor spend would not increase at all. When evaluating the length of stay of the Final Draw visitors, 43.2% conveyed the visitors might stay longer, closely followed by 40.5% who said that visitors would definitely stay longer and 10.8% who said they would not. When asked if the Final Draw visitors would travel to the destination again, 59.5% of respondents indicated that those who attended the Final Draw would be repeat visitors, 32.4% said they might be repeat visitors and 5.4% indicated they would not travel to the destination again. Figure 73: Final Draw Visitor Profile Final Draw Visitors 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% % of respondents 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Will spend increase Will visitors stay longer Repeat visitors Yes 62.2% 40.5% 59.5% No 10.8% 10.8% 5.4% Maybe 21.6% 43.2% 32.4% Preferred activities of Final Draw visitors Respondents were asked to identify the preferred activities that would be explored by the Final Draw visitors. As seen in figure below, the majority (78.4%) conveyed that the visitors would travel to the main attractions and icons. Other activities included gourmet products (37.8%), the soccer 75
  • 76. stadiums (13.5%), 8.1% (each respectively) identified nightlife and game drives, attending the actual draw (5.4%) and 2.7% thought they might seek business and investment opportunities. Figure 74: Preferred activities of Final Draw visitors Nightlife 8.1% Business opportunities 2.7% Game drives 8.1% Actual draw 5.4% Soccer stadiums 13.5% Attractions/Icons 78.4% Gourmet 37.8% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0% Basic characteristics of Final Draw visitors It was requested that the CTRU Reference Panel identify the basic characteristics which would best describe a Final Draw visitor. Most (43.2%) described a Final Draw visitor as a soccer fanatic, followed by those by those who are considered to be high profile (27%), high income and able to spend more and include leisure activities in their visit (24.3% each respectively) and 21.6% of respondents identified the visitors as influential. 8.1% conveyed that it includes those visitors who want to be involved and informed on aspects of the world cup. Other characteristics that were identified include enthusiastic/passionate people (5.4%) and a true socialite (2.7%). 76
  • 77. Figure 75: Basic characteristics of Final Draw visitors 8.1% 5.4% Influencial 43.2% 2.7% High income/spend more 21.6% High profile Leisure incl in visit Soccer fanatic 24.3% Wants to be involved/Informed 24.3% Enthusiastic/Passionate Socialite 27.0% 2010 FIFA World Cup™ Current state of readiness for the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ To effectively determine the readiness of Cape Town and the Western Cape for the 2010 FIFA World Cup™, it is imperative to obtain valuable inputs from the industry role-players, thus the CTRU Reference Panel was asked to evaluate each of the categories seen in the figure below. When observing the categories which were indicated by the respondents as “ready”, most (73%) believed that the tourism products are ready for 2010 FIFA World Cup™, followed by sufficient accommodation (29.7%), airports (24.3%), general service delivery (8.1%) and 2.7% each respectively indicated that the roads, level of crime reduction and public transport are ready for the influx of visitors. When looking at the factors identified which are “not ready” for the world cup, most indicated the public transport services (83.8%), followed by the condition of the road works (70.3%), the level of crime reduction (73%), general service delivery (48.6%), airports (37.8%), sufficient accommodation (32.4%) and only 5.4% of respondents thought the tourism products are not ready for the world cup. 77
  • 78. Figure 76: Current state of readiness for the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% % of respondents 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Sufficient General Crime Public Tourism Roads Airports accommodati service reduction transport products on delivery Not Ready 70.3% 37.8% 32.4% 73.0% 83.8% 48.6% 5.4% Neutral 24.3% 32.4% 35.1% 21.6% 10.8% 32.4% 13.5% Ready 2.7% 24.3% 29.7% 2.7% 2.7% 8.1% 73.0% Impact of the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ The CTRU Reference Panel was asked to rate the impact of the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ in terms of a number of relevant industry related factors. The panel was asked to agree or disagree with the statements as illustrated in the figure below. When observing the statements, 81.1% (each respectively) agreed that the cost of living would increase and the city would be more vibrant and exciting. 67.6% agreed that there would be economic growth, followed by 62.2% who believed that local business opportunities would increase. 59.5% of respondents believed that there would be nation building, confidence in Africa would increase (48.6%) and many jobs would be created (45.9%). 40.5% agreed there would be a post event slump, 35.1% each respectively thought disadvantaged individuals and communities would benefit from the social development and service delivery would improve. 32.4% was confident that property value would increase and only 18.9% agreed the crime rate would be reduced. 78
  • 79. Figure 77: Impact of the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Local Disadvanta Many jobs Service business Cost of Property Confidence Crime will More Economic Nation Post event ged will be delivery will opportunitie living will value will in Africa will be reduced vibrant city growth building slump individuals created improve s will increase increase increase will benefit increase Agree 45.9% 35.1% 62.2% 18.9% 81.1% 81.1% 67.6% 32.4% 59.5% 40.5% 48.6% 35.1% neutral 27.0% 45.9% 24.3% 29.7% 10.8% 16.2% 24.3% 45.9% 35.1% 29.7% 37.8% 45.9% disagree 24.3% 16.2% 10.8% 48.6% 5.4% 2.7% 5.4% 18.9% 2.7% 27.0% 5.4% 16.2% Findings have shown that the industry role-players are portraying a very positive approach in their views on the impact of the 2010 FIFA World Cup™. A larger percentage of respondents have agreed to the above mentioned statements and factors with regards to the anticipated impact on the tourism industry. When looking at the factors which the respondents did not agree to, findings show that crime is still a huge concern for the industry, most respondents did not agree that crime would be reduced (48.6%), compared to the 18.9% who agreed. 27% did not agree that there will be a post event slump, followed by 24.3% who disagreed in the job creation statement. 18.9% did not agree with the increase in property value, followed by those who did not agree the service delivery would improve and the disadvantaged individuals would benefit (16.2% each respectively). 2010 FIFA World Cup ™ Legacy The CTRU Reference Panel was given the opportunity to provide their perception on how the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ will contribute to the legacy of tourism in the destination. As seen in the figure below, most (48.6%) respondents indicated that the world cup will provide great destination exposure and contribute immensely to future marketing initiatives. 16.2% each respectively conveyed that the event will foster return visits and improve the infrastructure status of the destination. 79
  • 80. Figure 78: 2010 FIFA World Cup ™ Legacies Encourage future investment 2.7% Improve knowledge of soccer 2.7% Crime will affect future of tourism 2.7% Attract future events 2.7% World class stadiums 5.4% Long term growth 2.7% Setting a standard for other countries 5.4% Industry shouldn't increase prices 8.1% Good service/fair prices/offerings 5.4% Dependant on success of event 8.1% SA can host mega events 8.1% Increased crime due to immigration 2.7% Return visits 16.2% Integration of society 2.7% Great destination exposure 48.6% Improve Infrastructure 16.2% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% % of respondents However, the industry further expressed their concerns regarding current prices within the industry, 8.1% of respondents felt that prices should not increase dramatically due to the 2010 FIFA World Cup™, as domestic travellers should also be considered and encouraged to travel. A further 8.1% (each respectively) indicated that the contribution to the legacy will be dependent on the success of the event and if successful, South Africa would have proven to have the ability to host mega events. 5.4% each respectively said that South Africa will definitely benefit from the world class stadiums being build, a huge standard will be set for other countries and if excellent services are delivered, good prices and products are offered, a long lasting legacy will be sustained. 2.7% of respondents each respectively conveyed that the world cup will encourage future investment, the event will improve knowledge of soccer, future events will be attracted to the destination, long term growth will follow and the world will be able to see that South Africa consists of an integrated society. Amongst the responses the concern of crime within South Africa was raised once more, respondents felt that crime will affect the future of tourism development and growth if serious 80
  • 81. measures are not implemented. The industry has also expressed their concern that immigration might increase the level of crime within the country, if not controlled effectively (2.7%, each respectively). General concerns not covered in survey The CTRU Reference Panel was given the opportunity to highlight any further concerns which were not covered within the survey. As seen below, 2.7% each respectively indicated the following: • The industry would like to see more collaboration amongst provincial and SADC tourism authorities and industry; • The general attitudes of the local population to 2010 FIFA World Cup ™ should be taken into account; • Crime was highlighted once again, followed by the cultural aspects of South Africa. Respondents felt that there is not enough assistance provided to the SMMEs. A further percentage of respondents expressed their concern regarding the supply within the restaurant and hospitality industry (whether the supply is sufficient for the anticipated influx of visitors). There were those who felt that the public transport system is under supplied, furthermore, with the modern infrastructure implemented the industry feels that it is currently implicating the PDIs, and follow up methods should be put in place to enforce proper training aligned to the change in infrastructure. It was highlighted that there is a huge lack in experienced and qualified drivers, which might affect the performance and service standards for the upcoming 2010 FIFA World Cup ™. 81
  • 82. Figure 79: General concerns not covered in survey Collaboration of  inter provincial &  Lack of  SADC tourism  Rapid bus systems qualified/experienc efforts Attitudes of local  ed drivers population to 2010 Modern  infrastructure  Crime implicating  PDI's Little assistance for  SMME's Poor performance  of CTRU top  structure Sufficient supply of  restaurants for  Transport  Cultural aspects of  2010 influx undersupplied SA The poor performance of CTRU top management structure was highlighted. The rapid bus system has become a concern for the transport industry, more so for the taxi industry and their future income generation. The industry feels that each sector should equally benefit from the 2010 FIFA World Cup™. 82
  • 83. NICHE MARKET: FOOD TOURISM Introduction Food tourism is the study of the relations between travel and food. Ultimately, food tourism incorporates various cultural components with food as its central axis. Food tourism engages travelling in order to discover, experience, investigate and understand culture especially with reference to foods. This is an interdisciplinary activity as around food there exists dance, music, architecture, literature and history all influencing and being influenced by one another (http://www.southafrica.net/sat/content/en/us/full-article?oid=19403&sn=Detail&pid=123)(17 November 2009). Today’s travellers are looking for new experiences, are concerned about the environment and are interested in healthy lifestyle and desires to experience the local culture when on holiday (Yeoman I 2008). This relates to consumption as it is important for tourists to not only see and observe but also to taste and experience cuisine from local communities. For this reason, local food forms an important part of a destination’s character and adds variety to attractions and value to the experience (Shenoy SS 2005:1). Trends shaping our interests in food tourism • Disposable income and spending patterns Across the world growing wealth of the populations have a strong influence on consumer spending. Consumers spend a higher percentage of their income on prepared food, eating out and food items with some form of health or ethical benefits (Yeoman I 2008). • Demographic and Household structural change Families are also becoming increasingly independent in food choice, as children get older they have more influence in what they eat and where their family eats. Another factor that influences food choice is the various age groups of individuals and family units, therefore more people expect the places they visit to be flexible to the various aspects of their daily lives. In other words, eateries should be prepared for various situations, whether eating out for work, with children or simply eating alone. And lastly, rising divorce rates are also beneficial for food tourism, as divorcees have to socialise more to find new partners and subsequently will take potential partners out for dinner and away for romantic getaways (Yeoman I 2008). 83
  • 84. • The multi-cultured consumer Globalisation has significantly amplified the meaning of the term multi-culturalism within our society. We have access to an even wider range of ideas and interests with the help of the Internet, satellite television and the flow of people across international borders. The modern consumer can watch the latest Bollywood movie and can be influenced by seeing the movie to cook and eat a curry. They may have access to purchase the exotic spices to cook the curry and will also be able to do research on the various curries being prepared in India (Yeoman I 2008). Therefore, multiculturalism has now become an everyday concept in the daily life of the consumer (Shenoy SS 2005:9). The role of the celebrity chef and the media The media has significant influence on the purchase power of consumer’s food product selection. The influence of celebrity chefs is often referred to as the “Delia effect” after the media chef Delia Smith, whose 1998 television program ‘How to Cook’ resulted in an extra 1.3 million eggs being sold in Britain each day of the series (Yeoman I 2008). Our modern day celebrity chefs includes Jamie Oliver, with his various cookbooks, television shows and healthier food campaign focusing on serving nutritionally balanced meals to children at schools in the United Kingdom (Shenoy SS 2005:2). Health and food A move toward healthy eating habits has influenced food purchase decisions. Consumers are opting to buy the healthier alternative. These new consumer trends are influencing the food industry to become more flexible to the constant dietary fads and health scares. Established food brands such as McDonalds have added a salad to their menu so as not to loose their valuable customer’s support (Yeoman I 2008). • Food as an oasis Eating out is a growing form of leisure where meals are consumed not out of necessity but for pleasure. The atmosphere and social event are part of the leisure experience as much as the food itself. When on holiday, food forms an integral part of a social event when busy people create a ‘time oasis’, to reconnect with family and friends. With relation to the tourist, eating out can be both a need and a form of pleasure. While most tourists eat out to gratify their hunger, others eat out at a particular restaurant to experience local foods and cuisine which forms part of their travel schedule (Yeoman I 2008). As tourists’ desire for new experiences increases, the ‘authentic’ restaurant experience becomes more important. Authenticity is about food that is 84
  • 85. simple, rooted in the region, natural ingredients and with human interactions between locals and tourists which encompass all the aspects for a food tourism destination (Shenoy SS 2005:11). • The desire for new experiences and cultural capital Food has an important position and function in the emerging experience economy whether in the preparation, knowledge or consumption it. Food is used as a mode to preserve and institute a hierarchy resulting in inclusion and exclusion, thus reinforcing cultural and social boundaries. This relates to the cultural capital theory; that diverse patterns of consumption exists within society. This theory considers the physical necessity of eating as a cultural practice and food as one of the cultural resources by which people maintain differentiation (Yeoman I 2008). Eating is more that just a natural act and a tourist uses as well as increases cultural capital by partaking in food tourism, with food being a source of pleasure as well as a cultural resource. This means that the tourist has a need for new tastes, knowledge and ideas and consequently food establishes its own cultural capital, which destinations need to capitalise on. As consumers become wealthier and more sophisticated, they are drawn to new tastes and become more adventurous than previous generations (Shenoy SS 2005:11). • Food Tourism as special interest tourism Food tourism is developing steadily. People spend much less time cooking nowadays and rather opt to observe the preparation of dishes and watching cooking shows, eating out and buying cookbooks. Leisure researchers show that tourists may be divided based on their activities that they participate in, thus having a particular interest and become the key reason for travelling and activity. Eating out and drinking is also regarded as a cultural activity, where food and culture is imperative components (Shenoy SS 2005:1). Tourism marketing of food tourism destinations – Western Cape In the competitive world of tourism marketing, every region or destination is in constant search for an exceptional product to distinguish itself from the rest. Local food or cuisines that are distinctive to an area are one of the resources that may be utilised as a marketing tool to attract more visitors (Shenoy SS 2005:1). One of the best examples of food tourism marketing has been the rise in reputation of the Western Cape (South Africa) as a food tourism destination. The Western Cape’s food landscape expands from majestic mountains to a rugged coastline creating a melting pot of people, history, cultures and flavours. What makes the Western Cape food landscape unique is based in its complex and multi-cultural past. In Cape Town you can find everything from Cape Malay fusion food at Bo-Kaap’s Biesmillah to Xhosa classics at Gugulethu’s Mzoli’s Place - every dish taking you on a journey through South Africa’s multifaceted history and the layers of 85
  • 86. flavour interaction (http://www.southafrica.net/sat/content/en/us/full- article?oid=19403&sn=Detail&pid=123). Gone are the days when tourists want the tastes of home when travelling abroad. The modern travelers have unquenchable appetites for authenticity. This made way for the South African cuisine tours, satisfying the hungry traveler by exposing them to our various food cultures and hospitality traditions (http://www.southafrica.net/sat/content/en/us/full- article?oid=19395&sn=Detail&pid=469). An example of a food tour would be the Cape Malay cuisine tour. Cape Malay cuisine is the culinary legacy of those South Africans descended from 17th and 18th century political exiles and slaves who came to South Africa from the Dutch East Indian colonies of Malaysia, Java, Sumatra and Indonesia. Cape Malay cuisine is a fusion food born in Africa which merges basics of African, European and Asian ingredients, recipes and hospitality traditions. On the Cape Malay cuisine (walking) tour of the Bo-Kaap, where the Cape Malay people traditionally lived and still where you will find the best Cape Malay eating experience - you can sample the delights of coconut dusted koeksisters, samoosas, a hot curry with roti or experience hands on task of mixing masalas with a Cape Malay family in the Bo-Kaap (http://www.southafrica.net/sat/content/en/us/full- article?oid=19385&sn=Detail&pid=469 17 November 2009). Conclusion Today, the consumer is better educated, wealthy, has travelled more extensively, lives longer and is concerned about his health and the environment. As an outcome food and drink have become more significant and have a higher priority amongst certain social groupings. To a certain degree, food is the new culture capital of a destination, as if culture has moved out of the museum to become a living experience of consumption. One thing is clear; food must be a quality product, forming part of the holistic tourism destination product. The Western Cape as a food tourism destination has great potential because of its people, history, cultures and flavour, leaving the food tourists wanting for more (Yeoman I 2008). 86
  • 87. References Shenoy SS 2005. Food Tourism and the culinary tourist. South African Tourism 2009. The food terrior of the Western Cape. Available online at http://www.southafrica.net/sat/content/en/us/full-article?oid=19403&sn=Detail&pid=123 Retrieved on 17 November 2009 South African Tourism 2009. Overview of South African food tours. Available online at http://www.southafrica.net/sat/content/en/us/full-article?oid=19403&sn=Detail&pid=123 Retrieved on 17 November 2009 South African Tourism 2009. Cape Malay cuisine tours. Available online at http://www.southafrica.net/sat/content/en/us/full-article?oid=19403&sn=Detail&pid=123 Retrieved on 17 November 2009 Yeoman I, 2008. Why food tourism is becoming more important? ,. Available online at http://www.hospitalitynet.org/news/154000320/4037197.search?query=food+tourism Retrieved on 17 November 2009 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS TO: • United Nations World Tourism Organisation • South African Tourism • Statistics South Africa • Attractions that provided data • LTOs who participated in data collection Produced by:     For enquiries please write to:  research@tourismcapetown.co.za  87