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20100413 Younger Looking Hands Conceptual Design
 

20100413 Younger Looking Hands Conceptual Design

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  • An excellent focus: hands! This strikes me as an easier behavior than face, so the intervention is more likely to work. Good thinking about the system adapting. There's more to do here, but I'm glad to see your exploring this issue.

    I'm excited to see where this project will go. I don't see any big problems or issues. Just keep moving forward.
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    20100413 Younger Looking Hands Conceptual Design 20100413 Younger Looking Hands Conceptual Design Presentation Transcript

    • Younger Looking Hands A conceptual design by Rosemary Ehlers and Jen Paragallo Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Design Challenge To design a text messaging application that attempts to motivate female college students to apply sunscreen to their hands Time limit: 21 days
    • Younger Looking Hands
      • Persuasive Purpose
        • To motivate female college students to apply sunscreen to their hands on a daily basis to slow the signs of aging and help prevent skin cancer
      Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Industrial Design
    • User Description
        • Female Stanford undergraduate/graduate students (ages 18-30) who are concerned with self-image and put in the extra effort to "look good" every day
        • Already have the habit of applying non-SPF hand lotion throughout the day
        • Are comfortable sending/receiving text messages
      •  
      Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
    • Storyboard: Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Belle wants to keep her hands beautiful and young-looking, so she signs up for the Younger Looking Hands (YLH)program. Day 1: Noon Belle recieves a text message reminding her (oops she forgot!) to put on her hand lotion with SPF. She does so, then responds with 'Y'. Total time taken: 30 seconds. Day 2: Noon Belle receives her daily text message from YLH. Oops, she forgot again! But that's okay, it only takes 30 seconds, so she uses the lotion immediately and responds with 'Y'.
    • Day 3: Noon Belle remembered to put on her lotion before she recieved her reminder text! She proudly responds with 'Y'. Day 4: Noon Belle recieves no text message since she has been so consistent with using her lotion with SPF, and consequently forgets to put on lotion (oops). Day 5: Noon Belle recieves a text asking if she remembered to put on her lotion yesterday, and realizes she forgot. Oops! She responds 'N'.
    • Day 6: Noon Belle recieves a reminder text, but has already put on lotion! She responds with a 'Y'. Day 7: Noon Belle recieves no text, but remembers to put on lotion anyways. Day 8: Noon Belle recieves a text asking about her behavior yesterday, and this time is able to respond 'Y'! Eventually: Belle applies lotion with SPF every day for three weeks with a reminder text coming only once per week. Using hand lotion with SPF has become a habit!
    • Early Prototype of Younger Looking Hands General:                                    Personalized (target): Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
    • Features/Functionality
        • YLH sends a text ~12pm asking if the participant has applied sunscreen to her hands that day, and asks for a reply of 'Y' or 'N' (Yes or No)
          • The texting frequency is determined by the participant upon enrollment (e.g., daily, every other day, etc.)
          • If her frequency of texts is not daily, she is asked if she has remembered to apply sunscreen since her last reminder
        • If her reply is consistently 'Y' (e.g., three times in a row), the frequency with which she is texted is decreased
        • If her reply is 'N', the reminder frequency is increased (unless it is already on the daily setting) 
        • In addition to the reminder, each text also includes a random fact about the benefits of using sunscreen to motivate the participant
      Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
    • Theoretical Justifications
        • Minimize effort for the user --system requires a single-letter reply from the user
        • Minimize intrusiveness --if the user begins to adopt the habit, the intrusiveness of the system lessens
        • Responds to the user's needs --if the user begins to perform the habit without the reminder, the frequency of the reminder texts decreases; if the user forgets to perform the action without the text, the frequency of the reminder texts increases
      Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
    • Results of User Testing
        • [User research results here, if any. It’s great to include photos.]
      Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu NOTE: N/A at this stage
    • Shortcomings of Design
        • No way to ensure the user replies truthfully
        • In the beginning, the system is more intrusive (text reminders come at a higher frequency)
        • Participation is dependent upon the user checking her text messages in a timely fashion
      Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
    • Expansion - What else is possible?
        • Extension of the system from hands to face --if one is worried about her hands aging, then surely she must also be concerned about the effects of sun damage to her face
        • Possibility of generalizing the system to other habits; user could use a web interface to write a reminder message and choose what time of day and what frequency she wants to be reminded to do a particular action fo her choice
      Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
    • Next Steps in Design Process
        • Compile research for motivational facts
        • Recruit participants
        • Explain how the system is intended to work to the users
        • Provide users with a trial-size SPF hand lotion if they do not already own one
        • Run user-test(s)
        • Send out a short survey (provide incentives for completion, i.e., a batch of homemade cookies) to get feedback on the application from users
      Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
    • Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Evaluation of Design Project How well does the idea reflect concepts from class? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does the design match the design brief? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How viable/convincing is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
    • Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Evaluation continued… How well could this solution scale to reach many? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does this document communicate? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Bonus Points How insightful is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
    • Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Additional Comments: Overall remarks or additional comments here