Modal verbs

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A brief introduction to Modals and Modal Perfects.

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Modal verbs

  1. 1. MODAL VERBS
  2. 2. CAN COULD MAY MIGHT WILL WOULD SHALL SHOULD MUST OUGHT TO
  3. 3. Common Features:
  4. 4. <ul><li>They don’t add “s” for the 3rd Person Singular. </li></ul><ul><li>They have no –ing or –ed Forms. </li></ul><ul><li>They are followed by a 0 infinitive (except “Ought TO”). </li></ul><ul><li>4. They add “not” for the negative. </li></ul><ul><li>5. In questions, the word order changes to modal + subject + main verb. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Similar Structures
  6. 6. BE ABLE TO HAVE TO NEED HAD BETTER USED TO
  7. 7. Modal Verbs express ideas such as Possibility, Intention, Obligation and Necessity (More on the use of Modals and similar structures in your Textbook)
  8. 8. MODAL PERFECTS
  9. 9. FORM: Modal (+not) + HAVE + PAST PARTICIPLE Questions: Modal + Subject + Have + Past Participle USES: Certainty, Guess, Regret, Possibility, Ability, … IN THE PAST
  10. 10. SOME EXAMPLES: I may have lost my keys (Perhaps I lost them) He must have left (I am quite sure he left) She could have passed last year (She had the chance to pass but she didn’t) Should I have told you before? (Was it a good idea to tell you?)

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