California

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California

  1. 1. California Kevin Starr<br />Martha Plantz<br />History 141<br />
  2. 2. Chapter 6- The Higher Provincialism American Life in an Emergent Region <br />Josiah Royce<br />Americans needed personal connections more than ever before, because of the move to becoming an international empire<br />American could better discover what it meant to be an American by having identity in localized contexts<br />California became a distinct instance of American civilization <br />
  3. 3. Chapter 6- The Higher Provincialism American Life in an Emergent Region <br />During the Gold Rush there was much movement to California <br />The middle class Americans knew how to write and knew that their experiences were important not just for themselves but as records of what was happening in history<br />Many Americans wrote about; movements of exhilaration, loneliness, hope, despair, and sexual longing<br />Some professionals traveled to California not in search of gold, but to write about the events taking place due to the gold rush<br />
  4. 4. Chapter 6- The Higher Provincialism American Life in an Emergent Region <br />San Francisco continued to grow and was known as the “Pacific Coasts epicenter of urbanism and artistic creativity”<br />John Muir arrived in San Francisco in 1868<br />Muir was born in Scotland <br />After his arrival to San Francisco almost immediately moved down to the Yosemite Valley<br />Muir made huge impacts to the Yosemite Valley and many other California landscapes<br />As the population grew in California especially San Francisco many arts started to flourish <br />California supported art from frontiers <br />A main feature in paintings were landscapes of places such as Mount Shast, Mount Tamalpais, Yosemite Valley, Clear Lake, Napa Valley, and the oak-dotted hills of East Bay<br />Along with paintings, photography also began flourishing <br />
  5. 5. Chapter 10- O Brave New World!Seeking Utopia Through Science and Technology<br />California used technology to invent an American place<br />When airplanes reached their way to California they were adopted and perfected there<br />California had taken the lead in many technological advancements such as…<br />Vacuum tube technology<br />To make a possible radio and television<br />Smashing the atom<br />Californians always led the nation in biotechnology <br />
  6. 6. Chapter 10- O Brave New World!Seeking Utopia Through Science and Technology<br />The University of California opened in 1869 <br />This university was mainly focused on mining, geology, agriculture, and mechanical engineering<br />This became a crucial part of the development of the economic state<br />The greatest invention to come out of California was the Pelton turbine<br />This changed the world of mining <br />The best writing came out of California during the Frontier period<br />Other than Mark Twain<br />Californian geologists spent up to four years in the wild, measuring heights and land formation <br />These geologists included Clarence King, William Henry Brewer, Lorenzo Yates<br />
  7. 7. Chapter 10- O Brave New World!Seeking Utopia Through Science and Technology<br />Suburban areas of California were more focused on biological sciences<br />The Bay Area and San Diego were making the most advancements <br />Most biotech companies were working on medical advancements such as cures for cancer, Aids, strokes, heart attacks, blood clots, the list goes on<br />Three Californians played major roles in bring about astronomical traditions <br />These men were George Davidson, James Lick, and Richard Samuel Floyd<br />Davidson built the first astronomical observatory on the west coast, on top of a hill in San Francisco <br />Lick left funds to Davidson because he was so impressed by his work<br />
  8. 8. Sources <br />Starr, Kevin. California. Modern Library. 2005<br />

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