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Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
Micro Housing: Who Needs It?
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Micro Housing: Who Needs It?

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ADD Architecture and Design, Inc.

ADD Architecture and Design, Inc.

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  • 1. ANDREW Age: 25 Architecture KAREN Age: 27 Interiors JUSTIN Age: 29 Graphics MicroHousing: Who needs it???
  • 2. Luxury Housing Student Residence Halls Affordable Housing Living Gap Market Rate Affordability ?
  • 3. What we are seeing… • Increased housing demand • Production not keeping pace What we need… Affordability for emerging workforce, small families, single income households, divorcees and retirees.
  • 4. today’s focus • who needs it? • what is micro-housing? • how planning can help
  • 5. Amsterdam experience
  • 6. Micro-Housing: Who Needs It?
  • 7. 2013 Housing Report Card Database Special thanks to Barry B and his team at the Dukakis Center for Urban and Public Policy
  • 8. 100% 50% 0% Housing Child Care Food College Health Care 2005 – 2011 cost of living going up Percent change from 2005 - 2011 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 * SNEAPA data, percent change from 2000 - 2011 + 14% $ + 16% $ + 28% $ $ + 168% $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ + 66%* $ $
  • 9. $1500 $ 1000 $ 500 1990 2000 2010 1990 – 2010 Nominal rents going up 1990 – 2010 Data from Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 Up 80% $642 /month $786 /month $1160 /month
  • 10. 2009 – 2013 Home prices going up Single Famil y Home +4 % +4% Condominium Annual Median Prices for Greater Boston Metropolitan Area p.41 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 + 46% Double & Triple Deckers 50% 25% 0%
  • 11. +15% 0% -15% 2000 – 2011 Incomes stagnating/declining Home Owner Income + .9% -13.1% Renter Income 2000 – 2011 Median Income Greater Boston Metropolitan Area p.20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013
  • 12. Housing Cost Burden Over 25% are paying more than 50% of their income on rent 1990 – 2010 p.20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013
  • 13. Greater Boston Demographics: 1 in 3 are between 20 and 34 years old 1990 – 2010 p.20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 20-34 yrs 33%
  • 14. Over 40% are over 45 years old 45-64 yrs 27% +27% in 10 years 65+ yrs 13% 2011 Data p. 20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 We need buildings with elevators...
  • 15. Nearly 40 % are single person households 2011 p.20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 Do I want roommates? Not really...
  • 16. More small households, fewer children 16.9% Single living with others 37% Live alone 25.3% Families with no children under 18 23.2% Families with children under 18 2011 Data p. 20 Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2013 Over 75% don’t live with children
  • 17. Greater Boston housing supply Postwar neighborhoods built for much larger families
  • 18. City of Boston 272,000 units * 2007-2011 American Community Survey, Greater Boston 5 county data 1 Bed 25.8% 2 Bed 34.2% 3 Bed 22.5% 4+ Bed 10.8% Studio 6.7% More than 2/3 are larger units Figure 10: Share of Housing Units by Number of Bedrooms 2008-2012 Source: American FactFinder – 2008–2012 American Community Survey
  • 19. Greater Boston – 1.4 million units 3 Bed 33.6% 4+ Bed 22.9% Studios are only 2.1%! * 2007-2011 American Community Survey, Greater Boston 5 county data More than 80% are 2 Beds or above
  • 20. City of Newton – 32,344 units 3 Bed+ 65% 2Bed 23% Studios are only 1%! * 2008 -2012 American Community Survey, Newton data More than 87% are 2 beds or above 1 Bed 11%
  • 21. Newton 2030 : Change by age Seniors increase every decade * MAPC Projection Data
  • 22. Newton 2030 : Change by household size * MAPC Projection Data
  • 23. seniors widows We need smaller units for moderate income groups! divorcees inno workforce service workers creatives grads undergrads Resulting in a pressing shortage
  • 24. Effects of small unit shortage Students & emerging professionals 2x rent I’d like to live alone * 50% undergrads and 80% graduate students live in market-rate housing, data from Dukakis Family Priced out
  • 25. Widows and seniors I want to downsize Can’t move Family Effects of small unit shortage
  • 26. Price wars 2x rent Baby boomers Lots of college debt Leaving suburbs for city Millennials & couples priced out
  • 27. Increase the inventory of small units within the City of Boston * 2007-2011 American Community Survey, Greater Boston 5 county data 1 Bed 25.8% 2 Bed 34.2% 3 Bed 22.5% 4+ Bed 10.8% Studio 6.7% Adding 30,000 studios is only 10%
  • 28. What is micro- housing?
  • 29. Below the minimum 500 s.f. 750 s.f. 900 s.f. BOSTON UNIT SIZE Studio 1-BR 2-BR ‘METRO UNIT’ 450 s.f. 625 s.f. 850 s.f. Rent at $4 per sf per month $ 2000 $ 3000 $ 3600 Micro 300 s.f. $ 1200 $2000/mo is 60% of a person’s income making $50,000/ year
  • 30. ADD Inc research initiative Proprietary Research Studies
  • 31. How small would you go to live in Boston? 250 SF? 450 SF? Design and price matter more than quantity of space Proprietary Research Studies
  • 32. What would you share? WE DON’T COOK THAT MUCH Proprietary Research Studies
  • 33. How about multi-functional furniture? Proprietary Research Studies
  • 34. What kind of common space? • Small lobby/ party space • Laundry • Outdoor space with bbq grills We don’t need much! Proprietary Research Studies
  • 35. Prototype 300 s.f Unit Ma. Building Code (2009 IBC) mandates 220 s.f. occupiable floor area
  • 36. WHATS IN 2012 FULL SCALE MOCK-UP MOMU
  • 37. 172 units in 3 projects KAREN Units at 425 sf 450 sf 350 sf Innovation District
  • 38. 380 s.f. studio service workers Divorcee/ widowers Innovation workforce Studios address priority populations 275 Albany Street, South End, Boston
  • 39. 399 Congress - Micro Studio with sleeping niche 330 sf
  • 40. 1350 Boylston Street Units 440 sf Studio
  • 41. Compact 1 bedrooms 550 s.f. seniors couples divorcees
  • 42. Harvard Square Micros 500 sf 1 BR K LR BR BATH w s
  • 43. 500 sf 1 BR
  • 44. 1+ bedrooms too! Today’s families 680 s.f.
  • 45. 710 sf 1 BD + Den 1350 Boylston Street Units
  • 46. How planning can help
  • 47. Multi-family master plan zones near transit 1.  Density incentives for smaller units 2.  Expedited permitting for more low & middle income units (deed-restricted) 3.  Reduced parking ratios 4.  Reduced infrastructure improvements (open space, traffic mitigation, stormwater, etc.)
  • 48. Educate your town Data is compelling So is design!
  • 49. Your ideas?

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