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  • WESTMINSTER COLLEGE DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Biology 332 -- Immunology Fall Semester 2003 Instructor Patrick C. McCarthy 219 Hoyt Science Center phone 724-946-7211 fax 724-946-7791 e-mail pmcarthy@westminster.edu Course Description A study of the immune system at the molecular, cellular, and organismic levels. Topics include antigen-antibody reactions, hypersensitivity, tolerance, tumor immunology, autoimmunity, and immunity against viral, microbial, and parasitic pathogens. Course Objectives Students are expected to: A) develop an understanding of immunology, from preliminary ideas to established principles; B) gain the ability to read the literature of immunology, from research reports to textbook explanations to popular press presentations; and C) become proficient in laboratory methods of immunology, from basic skills to experimental protocols. Class Meetings Lecture TR 9:20-10:50 HSC 152 Laboratory W 2:00-5:00 HSC 343 Textbook – Kuby Richard A. Goldsby, Thomas. J. Kindt, Barbara A. Osborne, and Janis Kuby. 2003. Immunology, 5th edition, W. H. Freeman and Company, New York. Essays – Callahan Gerald N. Callahan. 2002. Faith, Madness, and Spontaneous Human Combustion: What Immunology Can Tell Us About Self- Perception. Berkley Books, New York. Schedule of Lectures, Discussions and Examinations When We Lectures Based on Discussions of Meet Kuby Textbook Callahan Essays T 26 Aug 1 Overview of the Immune System R 28 Aug 1 Overview of the Immune System Chimera 1
  • When Kuby Callahan T 02 Sep 2 Cells and Organs of the Immune System R 04 Sep 2 Cells and Organs of the Immune System Self and Antiself T 09 Sep EXAMINATION ONE R 11 Sep 3 Antigens Eating Dirt T 16 Sep 4 Antibodies: Structure and Function R 18 Sep 4 Antibodies: Structure and Function Self-Defense T 23 Sep 5 Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes R 25 Sep 5 Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Genes T 30 Sep EXAMINATION TWO R 02 Oct 6 Antigen-Antibody Interactions: Principles and Applications T 07 Oct 7 Major Histocompatibility Complex Light and Shadow R 09 Oct [NABT Meeting] T 14 Oct [Mid Break] R 16 Oct 8 Antigen Processing and Presentation T 21 Oct 9 T-Cell Receptor Watermarks R 23 Oct EXAMINATION THREE T 28 Oct 10 T-Cell Maturation, Activation, and Differentiation The Flame Within R 30 Oct 10 T-Cell Maturation, Activation, and Differentiation T 04 Nov 11 B-Cell Generation, Activation, and Differentiation Madness R 06 Nov 11 B-Cell Generation, Activation, and Differentiation 2
  • When Kuby Callahan T 11 Nov 12 Cytokines Acorns of Faith R 13 Nov EXAMINATION FOUR T 18 Nov 13 The Complement System Forgiving the Father R 20 Nov 14 Cell-Mediated Effector Responses T 25 Nov 15 Leukocyte Activation and Migration Saved by Death R 27 Nov [Thanksgiving Break] T 02 Dec 16 Hypersensitive Reactions The Metaphorhosis R 04 Dec 16 Hypersensitive Reactions Final Week EXAMINATION FIVE Schedule of Laboratory Exercises When Exercise W 03 Sep Cells and Tissues of the Immune System W 10 Sep 1) Antigen-Antibody Interactions: The Ouchterlony Procedure 2) Immunoelectrophoresis 3) Radial Immunodiffusion W 17 Sep Evolution of Serum Proteins: Part A W 24 Sep Evolution of Serum Proteins: Part B W 01 Oct The ELISA Immunoassay W 08 Oct [NABT Meeting] W 15 Oct Protein Evolution and the Western Blot: Part A W 22 Oct Protein Evolution and the Western Blot: Part B W 29 Oct Development of the Immune System and the Western Press-Blot: Part A 3
  • When Exercise W 05 Nov Development of the Immune System and the Western Press-Blot: Part B W 12 Nov Affinity Chromatography of a Glucose Binding Protein W 19 Nov Tissue Printing Detection of Brassica Phloem Cells: Part A W 26 Nov [Thanksgiving Break] W 03 Dec Tissue Printing Detection of Brassica Phloem Cells: Part B Schedule of Laboratory Quizzes Quiz One W 17 Sep Quiz Two W 08 Oct Quiz Three W 29 Oct Quiz Four W 19 Nov Attendance Policy Lecture Every student is expected to attend every lecture. However, each student will be allowed up to three absences, excused or unexcused, without any grade reduction. For each absence after that, there will be a grade reduction of 1%. Laboratory Every student is expected to attend and participate fully in every lab. Failure to do so will result in a grade reduction, as follows: 1 lab 3% reduction 2 labs 7% reduction 3 labs 12% reduction Because many of the labs involve the use of very expensive protein solutions that rapidly degrade at room temperature, it is not possible for students to miss these labs and "make them up" later. Moreover, the instructor does not permit students to substitute some other assignment (e.g., a thesis) for a missed lab. Ten-Page Essay This paper must deal with a topic in immunology selected by the student and approved by the instructor (no later than Tuesday, October 2). The due date is Tuesday, November 25. 4
  • The minimum/maximum length of the paper is 10-15 pages. This includes a cover page, the body of the paper, and a list of references. The font size should be 12, the font style preferred by the instructor is Arial, and the body of the paper should have an average of 250 words per page. The cover page must include a title, the student's name, the course number and name, and the final date of preparation. The body of the paper should follow the sequence of A) a thesis statement presented in a single paragraph, B) supporting information presented in several pages of text with clear transitions between paragraphs, and C) a conclusion section presented in no more than five paragraphs. These three areas of the body of the paper may be identified with section headings (such as Introduction, Text, and Summary), but this is optional. Remember that it is important to present the information as a clearly stated progression of ideas. Section subheadings may be used within the Text area if they add clarity to the information being presented. The list of references should include at least ten citations, five of which are from primary literature. The citation form for books and journal articles should follow the examples given in A Handbook of Biological Investigation (Ambrose and Ambrose, page 140 in edition six [2002]; page 141 in edition five [1995]; or page 134 in edition four [1987]). Internet citations should follow examples given in A Guide for Writing Research Papers located at http://webster.commnet.edu/mla.htm (look under A Sample Works Cited Page). Allergy Drug Report Work in self-selected teams of two or three. Instructor will assign each team an allergy drug (e.g. Alavert, Allegra, Benadryl, Clarinex, Claritin, Zyrtec). Turn in a written report that provides the following information about the drug: • chemical name • chemical structure • mode of action • indicated use • dosage • manufacturer • price • marketing claims Provide complete documentation. Due date will be Thursday, October 4. Time permitting, we will discuss the relative benefits of the drugs and try to determine which one is best. 5
  • Evaluations Four 100-point Exams 400 points Four 25-point Lab Quizzes 100 points Laboratory Notebook 100 points One Ten-Page Essay 100 points Five Callahan Essay Quizzes 50 points Allergy Drug Report 50 points Grading Scale A 93-100% C+ 77-79% D+ 67-69% A- 90-92% C 73-76% D 63-66% B+ 87-89% C- 70-72% D- 60-62% B 83-86% B- 80-82% F below 60% 6