Immunity, Vol. 20, 577–588, May, 2004, Copyright 2004 by Cell Press



Activation-Induced Polarized Recycling Targets
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                                                                                   Figure 1. T Cell Activ...
Polarized Recycling of TCRs at the Immune Synapse
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                                                                                  Figure 3. TCRs and TfRs...
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                                                                              Figure 5. The Presence of T...
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Figure 6. Plasma Membrane t-SNAREs Cluster at the Immunological ...
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peared weaker. This indicates that GFP-Cb was being            indicate that vesicle fusion mediated by t...
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Figure 7. Inactivation of v-SNAREs by Tetanus Toxin Inhibits TCR...
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antigenic stimulation of TCRs should enhance their sort-                 Expression vectors for GFP-Cb an...
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nonparametrical Mann-Whitney test. A difference between values  ...
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(1998). Three-dimensional segregation of supramolecular activation
clusters in T cells. Nature 395, 82–86...
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PII: S1074-7613(04)00106-2

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  1. 1. Immunity, Vol. 20, 577–588, May, 2004, Copyright 2004 by Cell Press Activation-Induced Polarized Recycling Targets T Cell Antigen Receptors to the Immunological Synapse: Involvement of SNARE Complexes Vincent Das,1 Beatrice Nal,1 Annick Dujeancourt,1 ´ secretory apparatus (Kupfer et al., 1991) could target Maria-Isabel Thoulouze,1 Thierry Galli,3 Pascal Roux,2 newly synthesized receptors to the T cell-APC contact Alice Dautry-Varsat,1 and Andres Alcover1,* ´ area. This mechanism could be relevant for receptors 1 Unite de Biologie des Interactions Cellulaires ´ being secreted in significant amounts but would not Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique have a strong influence on those with a long surface Unite de Recherche Associee-2582 ´ ´ half-life, like the TCR (Alcover and Alarcon, 2000; Liu et ´ 2 Plate-forme d’Imagerie Dynamique al., 2000; and references therein). Moreover, for recep- Institut Pasteur tors being continuously internalized and recycled back 75724 Paris Cedex 15 to the plasma membrane, like TCRs, polarized recycling 3 Institut National de la Sante et la Recherche ´ could target them to the APC contact site. This mecha- Medicale U-536 ´ nism implies that the internalization of receptors occurs Institut du Fer-a-Moulin ` randomly at any part of the cell surface, whereas their 75005 Paris recycling preferentially occurs in the APC contact area, France leading to the local accumulation of receptors at the site of exocytosis. This type of transport was observed during cell migration, or phagocytosis, where recycling Summary endosomes were redirected to the front lamella, or the phagocytic cup, leading to the polarized insertion of The mechanism by which T cell antigen receptors membrane components (Booth et al., 2001; Bretscher, (TCR) accumulate at the immunological synapse has 1996). not been fully elucidated. Since TCRs are continuously Studies on lytic granule secretion in cytotoxic T cells internalized and recycled back to the cell surface, we (CTLs) showed that polarized exocytosis is regulated at investigated the role of polarized recycling in TCR tar- various stages from vesicle movement inside the cell to geting to the immunological synapse. We show here vesicle fusion at the target cell contact site. Vesicle that the recycling endosomal compartment of T cells traffic toward the immunological synapse seems to oc- encountering activatory antigen-presenting cells (APCs) cur, at least in part, on microtubules. Moreover, the polarizes towards the T cell-APC contact site. More- molecules involved in vesicle docking and fusion have over, TCRs in transit through recycling endosomes are begun to be elucidated (Clark and Griffiths, 2003; Clark targeted to the immunological synapse. Inhibition of et al., 2003; Feldmann et al., 2003). T cell polarity, constitutive TCR endocytosis, or recy- Proteins involved in vesicle docking and fusion and cling reduces TCR accumulation at the immunological regulatory proteins of this process may concentrate at synapse. Conversely, increasing the amount of TCRs particular areas of the membrane forming “active zones” in recycling endosomes before synapse formation en- at which vesicle docking and fusion can efficiently take hanced their accumulation. Finally, we show that exo- place (Spiliotis and Nelson, 2003). Vesicle fusion is medi- cytic t-SNAREs from T cells cluster at the APC contact ated by SNAREs (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor at- site and that tetanus toxin inhibits TCR accumulation tachment protein receptors), which are on transport ves- at the immunological synapse, indicating that vesicle icles (v-SNAREs) and on target membranes (t-SNAREs). fusion mediated by SNARE complexes is involved in Vesicle fusion is mediated by the formation of trimol- TCR targeting to the immunological synapse. ecular complexes between two t-SNAREs and one v-SNARE. Exocytosis in nonneuronal cells may involve Introduction two plasma membrane t-SNAREs (syntaxin-3 or -4 and SNAP-23) and one v-SNARE (i.e., synaptobrevin-2/ Soon upon antigen recognition by T lymphocytes, T cell VAMP-2 or cellubrevin/VAMP-3 from recycling endo- antigen receptors (TCR), coreceptors, adhesion mole- somes) (Hay, 2001). cules, and signaling and cytoskeletal components accu- Since TCRs are continuously internalized and recy- mulate and segregate into supramolecular clusters at cled back to the cell surface (Alcover and Alarcon, 2000; ´ the T cell-APC contact site, termed the immunological Dietrich et al., 2002; Liu et al., 2000; and references synapse (Grakoui et al., 1999; Monks et al., 1998). In therein), we asked whether their accumulation at the order to concentrate at the immunological synapse, re- immunological synapse could occur via polarized recy- ceptors need to be targeted to the T cell-APC contact cling of endocytosed receptors. The data we present zone. Several routes can be envisaged, either on the here strongly support this hypothesis. cell surface or through the cell interior. Thus, receptors can move on the T cell surface by passive lateral diffu- Results sion (Favier et al., 2001) or by a cytoskeleton-mediated active movement (Wulfing and Davis, 1998). In addition, ¨ T Cell Activation Induces the Polarization intracellular traffic could also transport receptors to the of Transferrin Receptor Recycling immunological synapse. Thus, the polarization of the to the T Cell-APC Contact Zone A sign for polarized recycling is the accumulation of *Correspondence: aalcover@pasteur.fr proteins undergoing continuous endocytosis and recy-
  2. 2. Immunity 578 Figure 1. T Cell Activation Induces the Polar- ization of TfR Recycling to the T Cell-APC Contact Zone (A–C) Jurkat T cells were incubated with APCs pulsed with medium alone (control) or with superantigen (activated). Cells were then fixed and stained with anti-CD3 and anti-TfR mAbs under nonpermeabilizing ([A] and [B] and the TCR panel in [C]) or permeabilizing (TfR panel in [C]) conditions, followed by Texas red- and Alexa488-second Abs. A medial confocal optical section is shown. (D) T cell-APC conjugates displaying TfR ac- cumulations at the contact site were scored by counting under the microscope. The per- centage of T cell-APC conjugates display- ing optically defined TfR accumulations is plotted. (E) The fluorescence intensity due to TfR ac- cumulation at the T cell-APC contact site was quantified as described in the Experimental Procedures. Each dot represents a T cell- APC conjugate. The bar shows the average value. The values between control and acti- vated cells were significantly different (p 0.0001). (F and G) Recycling endosomes were labeled by incubating Jurkat cells with Alexa488-Tf for 30 min at 37 C. The remaining cell surface labeling was removed by acid wash at 4 C. Cells were then put in contact with APCs pulsed with medium (F) or superantigen (G) and filmed at 37 C. Forty percent of conju- gates formed by superantigen-stimulated cells displayed Tf vesicle accumulation at the immunological synapse versus 0% in controls (n 20). Arrows show the accumula- tion of TCR, TfR, or Tf at the synapse, whereas arrowheads show the intracellular recycling endosomal compartment. One rep- resentative experiment out of at least three independent ones is shown. cling, like the transferrin receptor (TfR) at particular sites TfR accumulation at the APC contact site (Figure 1C, of the plasma membrane (Bretscher, 1996). Therefore, arrows). to investigate whether polarized recycling occurs during To study the dynamics of polarized recycling we the formation of the immunological synapse, we ana- filmed cells loaded with fluorescent Tf. We observed lyzed the cell surface distribution of TfRs in T cells en- that the recycling endosomal compartment labeled with countering superantigen-pulsed APCs. As shown in Alexa488-Tf rapidly polarized toward superantigen- Figure 1, Jurkat T cells conjugated with superantigen- pulsed APCs (Figure 1G, arrowheads), leading to the pulsed APCs displayed, at the contact zone, an accu- accumulation of Tf vesicles at the contact site (Figure mulation of TfRs that overlapped with the TCR cluster 1G, 6–9 min, arrow). This was observed in 40% of the (Figure 1B, arrows). In contrast, in the absence of super- conjugates formed in the presence of superantigen. In antigen, both TfRs and TCRs appeared uniformly distrib- contrast, in the absence of superantigen, accumulation uted on the T cell surface (Figure 1A). We found that of Tf vesicles at the contact site was never observed 80% of T cell-APC conjugates formed in the presence (Figure 1F, arrowhead). Altogether, these data show that of superantigen presented accumulation of TfRs in the receptors may be targeted from recycling endosomes contact zone versus 20% in controls (Figure 1D). Fluo- to the immune synapse via polarized recycling. rescence intensity due to TfR accumulation in the con- tact zone was about 5-fold higher in superantigen-acti- TCRs Present in Recycling Endosomes Are Targeted vated cells (Figure 1E). Concomitantly, the recycling to the APC Contact Zone endosomal compartment, characterized by intracellu- Since TCRs are continuously internalized and recycled lar vesicles and tubules containing TfR (Figure 1C, ar- back to the cell surface, we hypothesized that polarized rowheads), was polarized and apposed to the site of recycling of internalized TCRs could target them to the
  3. 3. Polarized Recycling of TCRs at the Immune Synapse 579 Figure 2. TCRs Present in Recycling Endo- somes Are Targeted to the T Cell-APC Con- tact Zone (A and B) Jurkat T cells were incubated with Alexa488-anti-CD3 Fab for 30 min at 37 C. The remaining surface labeling was then removed by acid wash at 4 C. Cells were put in contact with APCs pulsed with medium alone (A) or with superantigen (B) for 30 min at 37 C. The cells were then fixed and surface TCRs stained with anti-CD3 mAb and Texas red- second Ab under nonpermeabilizing condi- tions to localize surface TCR accumulation at the synapse. A medial confocal optical sec- tion is shown. Arrowheads point to recycling endosomes containing anti-CD3 Fab, and arrows point to the TCR cluster at the APC contact site. Eighty percent of conjugates formed by superantigen-stimulated cells dis- played accumulation of anti-CD3 Fab-con- taining vesicles at the synapse versus 10% in controls (n 100). (C and D) Jurkat cells were incubated with Alexa488-anti-CD3 mAb for 30 min at 37 C. The remaining surface Ab was then removed by acid wash at 4 C. Cells were put in contact with APCs pulsed with medium alone (C) or with superantigen (D) and filmed at 37 C. Ar- rowheads show the Ab in endosomes, whereas arrows point to anti-CD3 accumula- tion at the synapse. Forty-three percent of conjugates formed by superantigen-stimu- lated cells displayed anti-CD3-containing vesicle accumulation at the synapse versus 0% in controls (n 7). (E) Cells were incubated with Alexa488-anti- CD3 mAb for 30 min at 37 C. The remaining surface Ab was then removed by acid wash at 4 C. Cells were then put in contact with superantigen-pulsed APCs for 30 min at 37 C. Finally, cells were fixed and stained under nonpermeabilizing conditions with a Texas red-second Ab. A medial confocal optical section is shown. Arrows point to the accumulation of anti-CD3 mAb at the synapse, which is accessible to the Texas red-second antibody (red, yellow) and is therefore at the cell surface. Arrowheads point to recycling endosomes containing the Ab but not accessible to the Texas red-second Ab (green). One representative experiment out of at least three independent ones is shown. APC contact zone, facilitating their accumulation in the TCRs were labeled with Alexa488-anti-CD3 Ab and their immunological synapse. To analyze this, surface TCRs fate followed by time-lapse microscopy. In this case an were tracked through the endosomal and recycling entire IgG was used to label internalized TCRs. Whole pathway using an Alexa488-labeled Fab fragment of an Ig was labeled to a higher degree than Fab fragments anti-CD3 mAb. Internalized anti-CD3 Fab was localized allowing a better detection of TCRs in recycling endo- in intracellular vesicles that colocalized with Tf, indicat- somes, which are present in low amounts. Although ing that labeled TCRs were in recycling endosomes (see bifunctional anti-CD3 mAbs increase the rate of TCR Supplemental Figure S1a at http://www.immunity.com/ endocytosis, and lead, at later times, to TCR sorting to cgi/content/full/20/5/577/DC1). Cells having internal- lysosomes (Alcover and Alarcon, 2000, and our unpub- ´ ized anti-CD3 Fab were then exposed to superantigen- lished data), they did not preclude the recycling of a pulsed APCs for 30 min at 37 C and then fixed. Surface significant amount of TCRs within the time period of TCRs were then stained under nonpermeabilizing condi- these experiments. Internalized Alexa488-anti-CD3 mAb tions to localize surface TCR accumulation at the im- colocalized with internalized Tf, indicating that it was mune synapse. Intracellular vesicles containing the in- located in recycling endosomes (Supplemental Figure ternalized Alexa488-Fab were polarized toward the APC S1b). Endosomes containing anti-CD3 Ab rapidly polar- (Figure 2B, arrowhead) and accumulated at the synapse ized toward superantigen-pulsed APCs and accumu- where surface TCRs clustered (Figure 2B, arrows). We lated at the contact zone (Figure 2D). We found that 40% found that 80% of T cell-APC conjugates formed in the of the T cell-APC conjugates formed in the presence presence of superantigen displayed accumulation of of superantigen polarized and accumulated anti-CD3- anti-CD3 Fab-containing vesicles at the immunological containing vesicles at the immune synapse. In contrast, synapse versus 10% in controls (Figure 2A). These data none of the T cell-APC conjugates formed in the absence indicate that, as TfRs, internalized TCRs can be trans- of superantigen accumulated internalized TCRs at the ported to the immunological synapse via recycling endo- contact zone (Figure 2C). somes. To assess that TCRs from recycling endosomes in- To study the dynamics of this process, internalized deed reached the cell surface at the immune synapse,
  4. 4. Immunity 580 Figure 3. TCRs and TfRs Present in Recy- cling Endosomes Are Targeted to the Immu- nological Synapse of PBTLs Human PBTLs were incubated for 30 min at 37 C with Alexa488-labeled anti-TfR mAb (A and B) or anti-CD3 (C and D). The remaining surface Abs were then removed by acid wash at 4 C. Cells were then put in contact with APCs pulsed with medium alone (A and C) or with superantigen (B and D) for 30 min at 37 C. Finally, the cells were fixed and stained under nonpermeabilizing conditions with a Texas red-second Ab. A medial confocal opti- cal section is shown. Arrows point to the ac- cumulation of anti-CD3 or anti-TfR mAbs at the synapse, which is accessible to the Texas red-second antibody (red, yellow) and is therefore at the cell surface. Arrowheads point to recycling endosomes containing each of the Alexa488 Abs, but not accessible to the second Ab (green). Ninety percent of conjugates formed by superantigen-stimu- lated cells displayed Tf- or anti-CD3-con- taining vesicle accumulation at the synapse versus 10% in controls (n 25). One repre- sentative experiment out of at least three in- dependent ones is shown. cells were fixed and stained at the end of the activation APCs and recycle TfR and TCRs from this compartment period with a Texas red-second Ab under nonpermeabil- to the immunological synapse. izing conditions. The Texas red-second Ab detected a cluster of anti-CD3-Alexa488 at the T cell-APC contact The Microtubule Polymerization Inhibitor Colchicine site (Figure 2E, arrow). In addition, intracellular vesicles Blocks the Polarization of the Recycling Endosomal containing Alexa488-anti-CD3 mAb, apposed to the clus- Compartment and Reduces TCR Accumulation at the ter but not accessible to the second Ab, were still visible Immunological Synapse (Figure 2E, arrowhead). No detectable Ab was seen at In T cells encountering stimulatory APCs, the micro- the cell surface out of the contact zone, indicating that tubule-organizing center (MTOC) translocates to the the Ab was preferentially recycled to the synapse. These area facing the APC, and microtubules extend from the results indicate that TCRs in transit through recycling MTOC to the APC contact zone (Kuhn and Poenie, 2002; endosomes were targeted to the immunological syn- Kupfer and Singer, 1989). Since the recycling endosomal apse via polarized recycling. compartment localizes in the same area as the MTOC To extend our studies to nontransformed T lympho- and polarizes together with it toward the APC contact cytes, similar experiments were carried out on human area, we hypothesized that microtubules could help the peripheral blood T cells (PBTLs) by internalizing Alexa488- delivery of TCR-containing endocytic vesicles to the labeled anti-TfR or anti-CD3 mAbs. In the presence of immune synapse. Consistently, cells treated with colchi- superantigen, intracellular vesicles containing anti-TfR cine displayed impaired polarization of recycling endo- or anti-CD3 Ab appeared polarized and apposed to the somes toward the APC contact site (Figure 4B) and APC contact site (Figures 3B and 3D, arrowheads). In reduced accumulation of TCRs at the immune synapse addition, in both cases, a cluster of recycled Alexa488- ( 70% lower) (Figure 4C). This effect was unlikely due labeled Ab, accessible to the Texas red-second Ab was to a side effect of colchicine on TCR signaling, since observed in the T cell-APC contact site (Figures 3B and early tyrosine phosphorylation was not significantly in- 3D, arrows). In contrast, in the absence of superantigen, hibited in colchicine-treated cells with respect to con- neither the close contact of the endosomal compart- trols, although a partial reduction in some high molecular ment nor the cluster of recycled Abs was observed (Fig- weight bands could be observed (Supplemental Figure ures 3A and 3C). The fluorescence due to internalized S2a). These data suggest that the polarization of the anti-CD3 Ab was much weaker than that of the anti-TfR recycling endosomal compartment is necessary for effi- Ab (compare Figures 3A and 3B with 3C and 3D). This cient accumulation of TCRs at the immunological is consistent with the fact that the amount of TCRs in synapse. recycling endosomes is lower than that of TfRs and can explain why TCRs randomly recycled in control cells Inhibition of Constitutive TCR Endocytosis Reduces were undetectable by the second Ab (Figure 3C, red). TCR Accumulation at the Immunological Synapse These experiments indicate that PBTLs polarize their If cycles of internalization and recycling are important endosomal compartment toward superantigen-pulsed for TCR targeting to the APC contact zone, inhibiting
  5. 5. Polarized Recycling of TCRs at the Immune Synapse 581 Figure 4. Cochicine Blocks the Polarization of the Recycling Endosomal Compartment and Inhibits TCR Accumulation at the Immu- nological Synapse (A and B) Jurkat T cells were incubated in medium alone (A) or with 20 M colchicine (B) for 5 min at 37 C. Cells were then put in contact with superantigen-pulsed APCs and incubated for 30 min at 37 C. Cells were fixed and stained under nonpermeabilizing condi- tions with anti-CD3 mAb to stain cell surface TCRs, followed by Texas red-second Ab. Cells were then permeabilized and stained with anti-TfR mAb, followed by Alexa488-sec- ond Abs. A medial confocal optical section is shown. Arrowheads point to recycling en- dosomes. (C) The fluorescence intensity due to TCR clusters at the T cell-APC contact site was quantified as described in the Experimental Procedures. Each dot represents a T cell- APC conjugate. The bar shows the average value. The values of colchicine-treated and untreated cells were significantly different (p 0.0001). One representative experiment out of at least three independent ones is shown. constitutive TCR endocytosis should reduce their accu- 30 min, PdBu was washed out at 4 C, and T cells were mulation in this area. To investigate this, we studied cells put in contact with superantigen-pulsed APCs for 30 expressing CD3 subunits mutated in the endocytosis min at 37 C. The fluorescence intensity due to TCR accu- motif (dileucine 132–133) that controls constitutive TCR mulation at the APC contact zone was about 2-fold endocytosis (Dietrich et al., 2002). Two Jurkat clones higher in cells pretreated with PdBu than in untreated expressing CD3 wild-type (WT), or mutated in the endo- controls (Figures 5C and 5D). It is noteworthy that TCR cytosis motif (LL/AA), and expressing equal levels of surface expression in PdBu-treated cells was 50%–60% TCR at the cell surface (Figure 5A) were studied. Both lower than that of untreated cells and recovered up to cell types had equal TCR signaling capacities, as as- 80%–90% of the initial levels within 30 min of the PdBu sessed by protein tyrosine phosphorylation (Supple- wash (Supplemental Figure S3c). This indicates that mental Figure S2b). However, TCR clusters in CD3 LL/ about one-half of the surface TCRs were in recycling AA cells displayed fluorescence intensities significantly endosomes before encountering stimulatory APCs and lower than those of CD3 WT cells ( 75% lower) (Figure could recycle in a polarized manner toward the APC 5B). These data indicate that constitutive internalization contact site, thus improving their accumulation at the of TCRs is necessary for their efficient accumulation at immune synapse. the immunological synapse. Inhibition of Recycling Reduces the Accumulation Increasing the Amount of TCRs in Recycling of TCRs at the Immunological Synapse Endosomes before Conjugate Formation Primaquine was shown to inhibit the recycling of TfR Enhances the Efficiency of TCR Accumulation (van Weert et al., 2000) or MHC surface molecules (Reid at the Immunological Synapse and Watts, 1990). Consistently, primaquine reduced the If TCRs targeted to the immunological synapse come steady-state levels of surface TCRs by 30% within 15 in part from recycling endosomes, increasing the min (data not shown), suggesting that constitutive TCR amount of TCRs in this intracellular compartment before recycling was inhibited. Moreover, primaquine inhibited conjugate formation could facilitate their accumulation the recycling of TCR internalized in response to PdBu at the synapse. To investigate this, we took advantage (Supplemental Figure S3c). of the observation that phorbol esters increase TCR When T cells were activated with superantigen-pulsed internalization and accumulation in recycling endosomes APCs in the presence of primaquine, 80% reduction of that can be reverted by washing out the phorbol ester the fluorescence intensity of TCR clusters at the synapse (Alcover and Alarcon, 2000, and references therein). ´ were observed in both Jurkat and PBTLs (Figures 5E Therefore, Jurkat T cells or human PBTLs were treated and 5F) and a concomitant increase of TCRs in recycling with phorbol dibutyrate (PdBu) for 30 min to induce TCR endosomes (Supplemental Figures S3d and S3e). These accumulation in recycling endosomes. In these cells, data indicate that efficient accumulation of TCRs at the TCRs were accumulated in intracellular vesicles that APC contact zone requires TCR recycling. However, we colocalized with internalized Tf. In contrast, in untreated observed that cells treated with primaquine displayed cells, intracellular TCRs were mainly detected in the partially diminished protein tyrosine phosphorylation in endoplasmic reticulum and in much lower amount in response to superantigen activation (Supplemental Fig- endosomes (Supplemental Figures S3a and S3b). After ure S4a). It is tempting to speculate that the reduced
  6. 6. Immunity 582 Figure 5. The Presence of TCRs in Recycling Endosomes Conditions the Subsequent TCR Accumulation at the Immunological Synapse (A) TCR expression at the cell surface of CD3 -deficient Jurkat T cells reconstituted with CD3 WT or CD3 LL/AA mutant revealed by flow cytometry, using anti-CD3 mAb, fol- lowed by phycoerythrin second Ab. (B) CD3 WT and CD3 LL/AA cells were acti- vated with superantigen-pulsed APCs for 30 min at 37 C. (C and D) Jurkat (C) or human PBTLs (D) were incubated with 1 M PdBu for 30 min at 37 C to induce the accumulation of TCRs in recy- cling endosomes. Cells were then washed at 4 C to remove the phorbol ester, mixed with superantigen-pulsed APCs, and activated for 30 min at 37 C. (E and F) Jurkat (E) or human PBTLs (F) were incubated in medium alone or with 300 M primaquine for 15 min at 37 C. Cells were then activated with superantigen-pulsed APCs for 30 min at 37 C. (G and H) Jurkat (G) or human PBTLs (H) were incubated in medium alone or with 35 M brefeldin A for 30 min at 37 C. Cells were then activated with superantigen-pulsed APCs for 30 min at 37 C. (B–H) At the end of all these experiments, cells were fixed, and surface TCRs were stained, analyzed, and quantified as in Figure 4. The values between both image sets in each plot were significantly different (p values inside each graph). One representative ex- periment out of at least three independent ones is shown. supply of TCRs (and perhaps of signaling molecules) to sites of the plasma membrane and by the docking of the immunological synapse via recycling endosomes v-SNARE-containing vesicles at those sites (Spiliotis (see Discussion) could be the cause of the diminished and Nelson, 2003). To investigate whether polarized re- protein tyrosine phosphorylation. However, reduced cycling could be concomitant with t-SNARE clustering TCR signaling might also have other consequences on at the T cell-APC contact site, we stained cells with Abs TCR transport. Therefore, we used another inhibitor, against the plasma membrane t-SNAREs SNAP-23 and brefeldin A, shown to inhibit TfR and TCR recycling (Liu syntaxin-4. These proteins are homologs of the neuronal et al., 2000; Schonhorn and Wessling-Resnick, 1994). t-SNAREs syntaxin and SNAP-25, which are involved Brefeldin A was less efficient than primaquine in inhib- in fusion during synaptic vesicle exocytosis and were iting TCR recycling (Supplemental Figure S3c), but its expressed in T cells (Supplemental Figure S5a). Conju- presence did not inhibit protein tyrosine phosphoryla- gates formed between T cells and superantigen-pulsed tion (Supplemental Figure S4b). However, brefeldin A APCs, but not nonactivated controls, displayed both significantly inhibited the accumulation of TCRs at the SNAP-23 and syntaxin-4 clusters that overlapped with synapse, albeit to a lesser extent ( 50%) than prima- those of TCR in both Jurkat (Figures 6A–6D) and PBTLs quine (Figures 5G and 5H). Altogether these data indi- (Supplemental Figures S5b–S5e). cate that TCR recycling is necessary for efficient TCR Since these t-SNAREs are also expressed in the APC, accumulation at the immunological synapse. we asked whether their clustering was occurring in the T cell or in the APC. To analyze this, Jurkat T cells SNARE Proteins Cluster at the APC Contact Zone or Raji APCs were transiently transfected with a gene and Are Necessary for Efficient TCR Accumulation encoding a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged at the Immunological Synapse SNAP-23. The accumulation of GFP-SNAP-23 at the im- Evidence for spatially differentiated zones of exocytosis munological synapse was observed when the protein is supported by the clustering of t-SNAREs in particular was expressed in Jurkat T cells, but not when expressed
  7. 7. Polarized Recycling of TCRs at the Immune Synapse 583 Figure 6. Plasma Membrane t-SNAREs Cluster at the Immunological Synapse (A–D) Jurkat T cells were put in contact with APCs pulsed with medium alone (A and C) or with superantigen (B and D) for 30 min at 37 C. Cells were then fixed and stained with anti-CD3 Ab followed by Texas red-second Ab under nonpermeabilizing conditions to show cell surface TCRs. Cells were then permeabilized and stained with anti-SNAP-23 (A and B) or anti-syntaxin-4 (C and D) Abs followed by Alexa488-second Abs. (E–G) Jurkat T cells expressing GFP-SNAP-23 were mixed with untransfected APCs pulsed with medium alone (E) or with superantigen (F). Conversely, untransfected Jurkat cells were mixed with GFP-SNAP-23-expressing Raji APCs pulsed with superantigen (G). Cells were then incubated for 30 min at 37 C, then fixed, and stained with anti-CD3 Ab, followed by Texas red-second Ab under nonpermeabilizing conditions to visualize cell surface TCRs. A medial confocal optical section is shown. Arrows point to TCR and t-SNARE clusters at the synapse. The fluorescence intensities of SNAP-23, syntaxin-4, or GFP-SNAP-23 at the synapse and at a different site of the plasma membrane were quantified, and the ratio between them was plotted (right panels). Each dot represents a T cell-APC conjugate. The bar shows the average value. The values between activated and nonactivated cells were significantly different in (A) and (B), (C) and (D), and (E) and (F), and nonsignificant in (G) (p values inside each graph). One representative experiment out of at least three independent ones is shown. in Raji APCs, and it was dependent on superantigen in TfR vesicles (Supplemental Figure S5a–S5f). To im- stimulation (Figures 6E–6G). These data indicate that prove Cb detection and to avoid its detection from APCs, t-SNAREs from T cells cluster at the immune synapse. we carried out the experiments in Jurkat T cells express- We next looked for exocytic v-SNAREs at the immuno- ing GFP-Cb. As expected, the localization of GFP-Cb logical synapse. One v-SNARE located in recycling en- overlapped with that of internalized Tf and with an inter- dosomes, VAMP-3/cellubrevin (Cb) (Hay, 2001; McMa- nalized anti-CD3 Fab (Supplemental Figure S5g and hon et al., 1993) was expressed in T cells and localized S5h), although the overlap with the anti-CD3 Fab ap-
  8. 8. Immunity 584 peared weaker. This indicates that GFP-Cb was being indicate that vesicle fusion mediated by tetanus toxin- appropriately addressed to recycling endosomes. sensitive v-SNAREs is necessary for efficient TCR accu- In T cells forming conjugates with superantigen- mulation at the immune synapse. pulsed APCs, vesicles displaying GFP-Cb polarized and accumulated at the immunological synapse close to the Discussion TCR cluster (70% of conjugates) (Figure 7B, arrowhead and arrow). In contrast, in the absence of superantigen, Here we show that TCRs can be transported to the accumulation of Cb vesicles in T cell-APC junctions immunological synapse via recycling endosomes. This was much less frequently observed (24% of conjugates). type of transport requires, first, the continuous endocy- It is of note that some of these conjugates could ran- tosis and recycling of TCRs, second, the activation- domly present the Cb vesicles oriented toward the dependent polarization of the recycling endosomal APC, yet those vesicles were not apposed, at the T cell- compartment, and third, the fusion of recycling endo- APC contact site (Figure 7A). Interestingly, in activated somes with the plasma membrane at the APC contact cells, Cb vesicles seemed to dock very close to, but zone (see model in Supplemental Figure S6 at http:// weakly overlapping with, TCR clusters (Figure 7B, arrow- www.immunity.com/cgi/content/full/20/5/577/DC1). head). In not fully matured synapses, where TCRs clus- Although the constitutive endocytosis and recycling ters were not completely coalesced in a single cluster, of TCRs was shown before (Alcover and Alarcon, 2000; ´ Cb vesicles seemed to dock in zones where TCR clus- Dietrich et al., 2002; Liu et al., 2000; and references ters were absent (Figures 7C and 7D, arrows versus therein), its role in TCR function remained enigmatic. arrowheads). This suggests that the areas of docking Here we show that TCR cycling is important for its effi- and fusion of recycling vesicles and those of TCR clus- cient accumulation at the immunological synapse. Po- tering are separated at the immunological synapse. larized recycling of TCRs seems to be part of a general Time-lapse imaging of GFP-Cb-expressing Jurkat cells phenomenon of polarized recycling since we observed encountering superantigen-pulsed APCs showed that the polarization of intracellular Tf vesicles and the con- Cb vesicles rapidly polarized toward the APC contact comitant accumulation of TfRs at the synapse. It is of and appear to arrive mainly on the sides of the contact note that an intracellular pool of TCR was previously site. Interestingly, the arrival of Cb vesicles may occur observed in a vesicular compartment that overlapped simultaneously on both sides of the contact site or move with recycling endosomes and with the Golgi apparatus from one side to the other (Figure 7E, arrowheads, and (Blanchard et al., 2002). This may correspond to recy- Supplemental Movie S1). Altogether, these data suggest cling and/or newly synthesized TCR . Since the surface that the immune synapse is an active zone for fusion of turnover of the TCR is different from that of other TCR- vesicles coming from recycling endosomes. CD3 subunits (Ono et al., 1995), it could be targeted to To investigate the relevance of SNARE-mediated vesi- the immunological synapse, at least in part, in a different cle fusion for TCR accumulation at the immune synapse, manner. Polarized recycling could also bring to the area we analyzed the effect of tetanus toxin. This is a potent of contact other surface receptors, like CTLA-4 (Egen and selective protease which, by cleaving v-SNAREs, and Allison, 2002), and signaling molecules, such as inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis and neurotransmit- CD45 (Johnson et al., 2000), Lck (Ehrlich et al., 2002), ter release (Schiavo et al., 2000). In nonneuronal cells, LAT (Montoya et al., 2002), etc., which may be stored tetanus toxin inhibits various exocytic processes, such in or transit through recycling endosomes. Finally, other as recycling of TfR-containing vesicles (Galli et al., 1994) intracellular vesicular trafficking processes involving or GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane (Rand- signaling molecules, like SLP-76, but not involving Tf hawa et al., 2000). Moreover, it may inhibit cellular pro- cesses that need localized membrane supply, like vesicles, may also take place and contribute to set up phagocytosis (Booth et al., 2001). Two tetanus toxin- signaling complexes involved in T cell activation (Bun- sensititive v-SNAREs present in recycling endosomes nell et al., 2002). of nonneuronal cells, Cb/VAMP-3 and synaptobrevin- Inhibition of TCR trafficking by various methods did 2/VAMP-2, were proposed to be involved in receptor not lead to a complete blockade of TCR accumulation recycling (Galli et al., 1994; Randhawa et al., 2000). at the immunological synapse. This is consistent with Since, contrary to neurons, T lymphocytes do not have the existence of other mechanism(s) of polarized trans- tetanus toxin receptors on the cell surface, we trans- port of TCRs to the APC contact zone, like passive lateral fected cells with a gene encoding the proteolytic subunit diffusion (Favier et al., 2001) or cytoskeleton-driven of tetanus toxin, or an inactive mutant (Q234/E) (McMa- movement on the cell surface (Wulfing and Davis, 1998). ¨ hon et al., 1993). To monitor the activity of the toxin in Whether surface and intracellular transport of TCRs oc- situ we used cells expressing Cb tagged with GFP at cur simultaneously or sequentially during the formation the cytosolic N terminus. In these cells, tetanus toxin of the immunological synapse and whether these mech- cleavage leads to the detachment of the N-terminal re- anisms are differentially regulated will need further in- gion from the transmembrane anchor and results in GFP vestigation. diffusion in the cytosol (Figure 7F). In contrast, the cells Once targeted to the APC contact site, TCRs may expressing the inactive tetanus toxin mutant presented continue cycling locally between the plasma membrane a normal localization of GFP-Cb at the plasma mem- and the endocytic compartment, thus contributing to brane and in intracellular vesicles (Figure 7G). In cells the maintenance of continuous TCR triggering at the expressing the active toxin, the intensity of TCR accu- APC contact site. The immunological synapse is there- mulations at the synapse was 75% lower than in cells fore a site where exocytosis and endocytosis occur, as expressing the inactive form (Figure 7H). These data are neural synapses (Guldenfinger et al., 2003). Finally,
  9. 9. Polarized Recycling of TCRs at the Immune Synapse 585 Figure 7. Inactivation of v-SNAREs by Tetanus Toxin Inhibits TCR Accumulation at the Immunological Synapse (A and B) Jurkat T cells expressing GFP-Cb were put in contact with APCs pulsed with medium alone (A) or with superantigen (B) for 30 min at 37 C. Cells were then fixed and stained with anti-CD3 Ab and Texas red-second Ab under nonpermeabilizing conditions to label surface TCRs, followed by anti-GFP Ab and Alexa488-second Ab under permeabilizing conditions. A medial confocal optical section is shown. Note that, although nonactivated cells can randomly display the Cb compartment oriented toward the APC (A), no accumulation of Cb vesicles at the synapse was observed, as in activated cells (B). Arrows point to TCR clusters, whereas arrowheads point to the site of accumulation of Cb vesicles at the synapse. Seventy percent of T cell-APC conjugates displayed Cb vesicles apposed to the immunological synapse in superantigen-activated cells versus 24% in controls (n 100). (C and D) Three-dimensional reconstruction of a Z series of optical sections (C) and an xy projection (D) of the T cell-APC contact zone. Note that TCR clusters are not fully coalesced in a unique cluster. Cb vesicles appeared to dock on the side of the main cluster in an area where no clusters were detectable (arrowhead). (E) Jurkat cells expressing GFP-Cb were put in contact with superantigen-pulsed APCs and recorded by time-lapse confocal imaging. Representative medial confocal sections from various time points are shown (see Supplemental Movie S1 for a full 30 min sequence). (F–H) Jurkat T cells were cotransfected with plasmids encoding GFP-Cb and the tetanus toxin light chain, either the wild-type (F) or the inactive mutant (G). The day after, cells were put in contact with superantigen-pulsed APCs and incubated for 30 min at 37 C. Cells were then fixed and either left unstained (F and G) or stained with anti-CD3 Ab and fluorescence intensity due to TCR clusters at the synapse quantified as in Figure 4 (H). A medial confocal optical section of isolated cells is shown in (F) and (G). The values between cells expressing inactive or active tetanus toxin were significantly different (p 0.001). One representative experiment out of at least three independent ones is shown.
  10. 10. Immunity 586 antigenic stimulation of TCRs should enhance their sort- Expression vectors for GFP-Cb and tetanus toxin were described ing to lysosomes and their disappearance from the cell (Martinez-Arca et al., 2003; McMahon et al., 1993). The cDNA encod- ing human SNAP-23 was cloned in the plasmid pEGFP-C3 (Clontech, surface, leading to the extinction of TCR signaling (Lee Palo Alto, CA). et al., 2003; Liu et al., 2000; Valitutti et al., 1997). Polarized exocytosis of intracellular recycling vesicles Antibodies and Immunofluorescence Reagents at the immunological synapse was accompanied by The anti-CD3 mAbs UCHT1 (IgG1) and OKT3 (IgG2a) were used as clustering of the plasma membrane t-SNAREs syntaxin-4 described (Roumier et al., 2001). The anti-human TfR mAb OKT9 and SNAP-23. This suggests that the APC contact zone (IgG1) was from the American Type Culture Collection (Rockville, becomes, upon antigen stimulation, an active zone at MD). The mouse anti-human syntaxin-4 mAb (clone 49, IgG1) was which vesicle docking fusion can efficiently take place from Transduction Labs. (Lexington, KY). Rabbit Abs against SNAP- 23 and Cb have been described (Galli et al., 1994, 1998). Fluorescein- (Spiliotis and Nelson, 2003). Consistently, intracellular anti-mouse IgG1 Ab and the Texas red-anti-mouse IgG1 or IgG2a vesicles containing the v-SNARE of recycling endo- were from Southern Biotech. (Birmingham, AL). Alexa488-second Abs somes Cb seemed to dock at the synapse. Interestingly, were from Molecular Probes (Eugene, OR). Phycoerythrin-goat anti- the area where Cb vesicles approached the immuno- mouse Ig Ab was from Immunotech (Marseilles, France). Anti- logical synapse was located very close to, but weakly CD3(UCHT-1) Fab was generated by papain digestion and purified overlapping with, TCR clusters. This resembles lytic on protein-G sepharose, following the manufacturer’s instructions (Pierce, Rockford, IL). Anti-CD3 mAb (IgG and Fab, UCHT1), anti- granule secretion at the immunological synapse of TfR (OKT9), and Tf were labeled with Alexa488 using a Molecular mouse CTLs, which occurs on the side of the signaling Probes labeling kit. molecule patch (Stinchcombe et al., 2001). This sug- gests that the areas of vesicle docking and TCR cluster- Immunofluorescence Microscopy and Quantitative ing are distinct. However, the zone where plasma mem- Image Analysis brane t-SNAREs accumulated at the immunological T cell activation, immunofluorescence staining, and confocal mi- synapse appeared larger than that of vesicle docking croscopy were performed as described (Roumier et al., 2001). Prior and overlapped with TCR clusters, suggesting that the to fluorescent-Tf incorporation, T cells were incubated for 30 min at 37 C in serum-free medium to deplete the intracellular compart- actual area of vesicle docking may be narrower than the ments of Tf and then incubated for 30 min with 50 nM fluorescent- t-SNARE cluster. Finally, the inhibitory effect of tetanus Tf. Internalization of Alexa488-anti-CD3 or anti-TfR Abs was per- toxin indicates that vesicle fusion mediated by tetanus formed by incubating the cells with 1 g/ml of Ab for 30 min at 37 C. toxin-sensitive v-SNAREs is necessary for efficient ac- The cells were then set on ice, and the remaining surface labeling cumulation of TCRs at the immunological synapse. How- was removed by washing the cells 2 1 min in ice-cold acid medium ever, we cannot conclude from these experiments (RPMI 1640, 25 mM sodium acetate [pH 2]), followed by neutraliza- tion with RPMI (pH 10). This removed surface-bound Abs or Tf with whether Cb is the sole v-SNARE involved in TCR recy- 95%–98% efficiency (Supplemental Figure S1). For detection and cling. It is worth noting here that, whereas tetanus toxin- further quantification of receptor accumulation at the synapse, con- treated CHO cells display partially impaired Tf recycling jugates were stained with first and second Abs in the absence of (Galli et al., 1994), Cb null mice can normally recycle Tf detergent (nonpermeabilizing conditions) to reveal surface recep- (Yang et al., 2001). This suggests that other v-SNAREs tors only. Then, to detect receptors in intracellular compartments, present in recycling endosomes, like synaptobrevin-2, cells were stained in the presence of 0.05% saponin (permeabiliz- ing conditions). might be involved. Future investigation will be needed Confocal microscopy was carried out on a Zeiss LSM510 using to elucidate the relative contribution of different a 63 objective. Z series of optical sections were performed at 0.3 v-SNAREs to TCR recycling. or 0.5 m increments. Image deconvolution was performed using Interestingly, in dendritic cells encountering T lympho- Huygens software (SVI, The Netherlands), and three-dimensional cytes of the appropriate antigen specificity, tubular en- image reconstruction was carried out using Imaris software (Bit- dosomes containing MHC class II molecules extend and plane, Switzerland). Images to quantify were acquired at 2 m incre- ments with pinholes opened to obtain optical sections of 2 m polarize toward the site of interaction with the T lympho- thick. Two to three contiguous optical sections per cell conjugate cyte (Boes et al., 2002; Chow et al., 2002). Therefore, contained all the three-dimensional fluorescence information. De- during stimulatory T cell-APC interactions, both the tectors were set to detect an optimal signal below the saturation T cell and the APC may orient vesicular trafficking to- limits. Image sets to be compared were acquired during the same ward the site of contact in order to form both sides of session and using the same acquisition settings. Fluorescence as- the immunological synapse. sociated to clusters was quantified using Metamorph software (Uni- versal Imaging, Downingtown, PA). After setting a threshold for non- significant coefficients, the total gray level of pixels corresponding Experimental Procedures clusters at the synapse was measured. The same threshold was used for all the images of a quantification series. For nonactivated Cells and Expression Vectors T cells, conjugates between T cells and APCs were randomly stud- The human leukemia T cell Jurkat, clone J77cl20, the APC Raji, and ied. For activated T cells, only conjugates displaying TCR clusters the CD3 -deficient Jurkat reconstituted with CD3 WT or with the were quantified. This type of quantification based on the total fluo- CD3 LL/AA mutant have been described (Niedergang et al., 1997; rescence intensity due to TCR accumulation at the synapse is meant Roumier et al., 2001). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to reflect the total number of TCRs accumulated at the APC contact (PBL) were isolated from healthy donors by centrifugation on Ficoll- site at a given time, independently of their density per surface unit, Paque (Amersham-Pharmacia Biotech., Uppsala, Sweden). Staphy- that would also reflect the local organization in clusters, which oc- lococcus enterotoxin-specific T cells were then expanded by cultur- curs during the maturation of the mature immunological synapse. ing PBLs (106 cells/ml) in RPM1640, 10% fetal bovine serum in the Values were represented as dot plots, with each dot representing presence of 1 g/ml each Staphylococcus enterotoxin B and toxic the value of an individual T cell-APC conjugate. When this was shock syndrome toxin 1 (Toxin Technology, Sarasota, FL). Two days allowed by sufficient fluorescence intensity all over the plasma later, cells were set at 5 105 cells/ml in the same medium supple- membrane, the ratio between the intensity of fluorescence at the mented with human recombinant IL2 at 5 IU/ml. Experiments were immunological synapse and in another area of the plasma mem- performed at days 7–10. brane was calculated. Statistical analyses were carried out by the
  11. 11. Polarized Recycling of TCRs at the Immune Synapse 587 nonparametrical Mann-Whitney test. A difference between values G., Hamblin, T., Davies, E.G., and Griffiths, G.M. (2003). Adaptor was considered significant when a p 0.05 was obtained. protein 3-dependent microtubule-mediated movement of lytic gran- ules to the immunological synapse. Nat. Immunol. 4, 1111–1120. Time-Lapse Microscopy on Living Cells Dietrich, J., Menne, C., Lauritsen, J.P.H., von Essen, M., Rasmussen, ´ Experiments were performed using a Zeiss Axiovert microscope A.B., Odum, N., and Geisler, C. (2002). Ligand-induced TCR down- equipped with a heating stage, objective heater, a piezo translator regulation is not dependent on constitutive TCR cycling. J. Immunol. for Z stack acquisition, and a CCD camera (Micromax-1300, 168, 5434–5440. Princeton Instruments, Roper Scientific, Tucson, AZ) (Figures 1 and Egen, J.G., and Allison, J.P. (2002). Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 2), or a Zeiss LSM510 confocal microscope (Figure 7). Acquisition accumulation in the immunological synapse is regulated by TCR and image analysis were performed using Metamorph or Zeiss soft- signal strength. Immunity 16, 23–35. ware. T cells loaded with Alexa488-Tf or -anti-CD3 Ab, as described Ehrlich, L.I.R., Ebert, P.J.R., Krummel, M.F., Weiss, A., and Davis, above, or expressing GFP-Cb were mixed with APCs pulsed with M.M. (2002). Dynamics pf p56lck translocation to the T cell immuno- medium alone or with 10 g/ SEE at a ratio of 1:1. Cells were logical synapse following agonist and antagonist stimulation. Immu- immediately put onto poly-L-lysine coated coverslips, and a series nity 17, 809–822. of images were acquired every 2–3 min. One differential-interfer- ence-contrast (DIC) image and a Z series of fluorescence images at Favier, B., Burroughs, N.J., Wedderburn, L., and Valitutti, S. (2001). 1 m increments were taken. Deconvolution of fluorescence images TCR dynamics on the surface of living T cells. Int. Immunol. 13, 1525– was carried out using Metamorph or Huygens software. A time- 1532. stack was built with planes of interest and a projection made. Feldmann, J., Callebaut, I., Raposo, G., Certain, S., Bacq, D., Du- ´ mont, C., Lambert, N., Ouachee-Chardin, M., Chedeville, G., Tamary, T Cell Activation and Phospho-Tyrosine Analysis H., et al. (2003). Munc-13–4 is essential for cytolytic granules fusion T cell stimulation and analysis of phospho-tyrosine-containing pro- and is mutated in a form of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistio- teins were carried out as previously described (Niedergang et al., cytosis (FHL3). Cell 115, 461–473. 1998). Galli, T., Chilcote, T., Mundigl, O., Binz, T., Niemann, H., and De Camilli, P. (1994). Tetanus toxin-mediated cleavage of cellubrevin Acknowledgments impairs exocytosis of transferrin receptor-containing vesicles in CHO cells. J. Cell Biol. 125, 1015–1024. This work was supported by a Programme Transversal de Re- Galli, T., Zahraoui, A., Vaidyanathan, V.V., Raposo, G., Tian, J.M., cherche from the Institut Pasteur and by grants from La Ligue Contre Karin, M., Niemann, H., and Louvard, D. (1998). A novel tetanus le Cancer and the Association pour la Recherche sur le Cancer neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein in ` (ARC). V.D. is supported by an Allocation de Recherche du Ministere SNARE complexes of the apical plasma membrane. Mol. Biol. Cell ´ de l’Enseignement Superieur et de la Recherche, and B.N. by a 9, 1437–1448. postdoctoral fellowship from ARC. M.-I.T. is supported by a CR2 Grakoui, A., Bromley, S.K., Sumen, C., Davis, M.M., Shaw, A.S., position from the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Allen, P.M., and Dustin, M.L. (1999). The immunological synapse: a ´ ´ Unite de Virologie et Immunologie Moleculaires. The technical assis- molecular machine controling T cell activation. 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