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INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)
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INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP)

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  • 1. INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (INTBP) *2000 Foundations of Biomedical Science Primary objectives of the course mechanisms controlling cell, tissue and organ function, and to develop an understanding of the experimental evidence supporting these concepts through an integrated presentation of material from biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, neurobiology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology. The development of critical thinking skills will be emphasized through an evaluation of experimental evidence and reading of the primary literature. *2005 Foundations Conference Contemporary approaches to problem-solving in biology, as well as principles underlying modern methods of biomedical research will be integrated with the lecture component ofthe course through an analysis of mechanisms underlying biological phenomena. Sutdents will present papers, critically analyze data and devise experimental approackes to biomedical problems considered in lecture. *2010 Laboratory Research Rotation This lab is designed to introduce the student to relevant laboratory methods as well as the layout and conceptualization of experiments. The course will serve to acquaint the student with the laboratory process, and to facilitats his/her selection of a lab for dissertation research. Students are required to register for and complete rotations through three different laboratories, thereby ensuring broad exposure to method and practice. 2011 Lab Research Rotation Supplement Course supplement to INTBP 2010 for those students initiation their first rotation in summer. 2012 MD/PhD Lab Research Rotation Intensive lab rotations for MD/PhD students in the first term of INTBP study. This lab is designed for the experienced student researcher who has a reserach topic in mind. The course will facilitate the final selection of a lab for dissertation reserach. 2030 Intoduction to Biocomputing This course will provide students with the molecular biology computer skills needed to prepare effective written and oral scientific presentations. Topics to be covered include advanced searching of PubMed using Boolean operators, use of bibliographic management software, scanning images and manipulation in Photoshop, molecular biology databases, DNA sequence analysis (open reading analysis, oligonucleotide primer design and sequence alignments), BLAST searches, EST database usage and 3D structure analysis programs. *2290 Scientific Ethics The course is an introduction to the basic ethical issues which arise in the course of conducting scientific research. It is intended for graduate students and fellows in the
  • 2. biomedical sciences who have completed at least one year of graduate work. The course will composed of informal lecture presentations followed by discussion of issues in small groups. BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (MSBMG) 2500 MS Thesis Research A directed research project which results in a thesis for a master’s degree. 2510 Biochemistry of Macromolecules Topics covered in this course include the experimental determination of macromolecular structure, protein; DNA interactions, protein; protein intereactions, protein modification, and empirical prediction of macromolecular structure. 2520 Eukaryotic Molecular Genetics This course covers topics on DNA replication in eukaryotes, the structure and function of human chromosomes, inheritance patterns and the phenoypic consequences of mutations in humans, the mapping and isolation of human genes, animal models of human diseases, regulation of the mammalian cell cycle, and current aspects of gene therapy. 2550 Research Seminar Students present their research, or a recent research article from a broad range of topics selected by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor. The course meets weekly during which the student presents his/her research in progress or an article of his/her choice. Emphasis is placed on a careful analysis and critical evaluation of the manuscript as well as the development of teaching and speaking skills needed for scientific presentation. The student is expected to elucidate issues relevant to the topic and to answer questions from other graduate students and faculty. 2590 Directed Study This course provides the students an opportunity to carry out a specific laboratory project in any area of interest in biochemistry and molecular genetics. 3465 Gene Delivery The prospect of using genetically engineered viruses to infect human cells has led to the development of the science of viral vectors. This course will discuss the basic strategies for the development of viral vectors as well as their molecular biology and biochemistry. 3500 PhD Dissertation Study After advancement to candidacy for the PhD degree, students enroll in this course to pursue original experimental laboratory research, the results of which will provide the substance of their doctoral dissertation. A minimum of 40 credits of this course are required for the PhD degree in the School of Medicine.
  • 3. 3510 Advanced Topics in Gene Expression This course consists of lectures and class presentations on recent advances in the molecular genetics. The emphasis of the course is on the regulation of gene expression at the DNA, RNA and protein levels. Regulation in eukaryotes is emphasized, including yeast, protozoan, and mammalian systems. 3520 Current Topics in Cellular, Molecular and Structural Biology This advanced level course will focus on important new papers in four rotating topic areas (one per semester, two-year cycle). Tentative topic ideas include signal transduction, apoptosis, DNA replication, and cell cycle control. CELL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR PHYSIOLOGY (MSCBMP) 2800 MS Thesis Research A directed research project which results in a thesis for a master’s degree. *2820 Topics in Integrative Physiology Rather than the usual survey of organ systems which is typical of most physiology courses, this course will focus on the experimental apporoaches used to analyze complex homeostatic mechanisms in the intact mammalian organism. An attempt will be made to show how molecular and cellular methodologies can be integrated with classical physiological approaches to answer important questions about the survival and function of the whole animal. The subject matter will taught through lectures, problem- solving sessions, and examination of original papers. *2830 Cell and Molecular Physiology This course consists of lectures, problem-solving sessions, and examination of oroginal papers. A main focus will be on the application of modern biophysical and molecular- genetic approaches in the analysis of cellular function. Topics include: 1. Membrane transport: pumps, channels, and bioelectrical potentials; 2. Excitable Membranes; 3. Regulation of Ian Channels; 4. Absorptive and secretory functions of epithelia; 5. Signal transduction; 6. Molecular motors, cell motility, and muscle contraction. 2840 Regulation of Membrane Traffic Course analyzes membrane/protein traffic along both the biosynthetic & endocytic pathways. Emphasis placed on how this traffic is regulated. Topics include the roleof g-proteins (both heterothrimetric & small), coat proteins (coatamer 1 & 2 & adaptions), signal transduction cascades (PKC, PKA, IP3, etc.), & snare complexes in protein trafficking. Also, we will discuss the roleof the cytoskeleton in transporting cargo & signal transduction. Membrane traffic in several specialized cell types will be convered including polarized epithlial cells, cells of the immune system, & neurons.
  • 4. 2851 Research Seminar/Cellular Physiology Advanced research seminar with journal club format specializing in current aspects of cellular physiology. 2852 Research Seminar/Membrane Trafficking Advanced research seminar with journal club format specializing in current aspects of membrane trafficking. 2853 Research Seminar/Reproductive Physiology Advanced research seminar with journal club format specializing in current aspects of reproductive physiology. 2860 Multiparametric Microscopic Imaging A lecture/lab course which immerses students in the theory and practical aspects of modern microscopic imaging. The fields will cover the theory and implementation of all types of light and electron microscopy and computer aided imaging. Students will expected to reach a functional capability in a selected technology. 2870 Histology The objective of this lecture/lab course is student comprehension of the relationship between cell structure and organ function, and the application of the knowledge to the identification of light and electronmicroscopic images of cells and organs. 2880 Cell Biology of Normal & Disease States This course will extend basic knowledge of cell and molecular biology obtained in Foundations of Biomedical Science. The lectures will focus on four or five intensely active research areas of cell biology. Basic principles will be reinforced by considering disease states in which these processes are defective. Examples: cell growth and cancer, cell polarity, and protein targeting, diseases of ion channels, cell biology of diabetes. Lectures and discussion groups. 2890 Directed Study This course provides the students an opportunity to carry out a specific laboratory project in any area of interest in cell biology and physiology. 3800 PhD Dissertaion Research After advancement to candidacy for the PhD degree, students enroll in this course to pursue original experimental laboratory research, the results of which will provide the substance of their doctoral dissertation. A minimum of 40 credits of this course are required for the PhD degree in the School of Medicine. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR PATHOLOGY 2700 MS Thesis Research A directed research project which results in a thesis for a master’s degree.
  • 5. 2730 Molecular Mechanisms Tissue Growth & Difference The course covers the anatomy, embryology, histolgy, function, and growth regulation (growth factors, receptors, and signalling pathways) of various differentiated tissues (central nervous system, lung, liver, pancreas, urinary and reproductive systems, breast, endocrine system, skin, bone, skeletal muscle, bone marrow). Multidisciplinary lectures are given by the members of the departments of pathology, cell biology and physiology, medicine, and surgery who have on going research in these areas. 2740 Molecular Pathobiology Some representative of major disease categories (autoimmune, inflammatory, toxic, degenerative, infectious, genetic, and neoplastic: will be examined in terms of patient demographics (who), gross and microscopic morphology (what), and etiology/molecular mechanisms (why). 2750 Research Seminar Students present their research, or a recent research article from a broad range of topics selected by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor. The course meets weekly during which the student presents his/her research in progress or an article of his/her choice. Emphasis is placed on a careful analysis and critical evaluation of the manuscript as well as the development of teaching and speaking skills needed for scientific presentation. The student is expected to elucidate issues relevant to the topic and to answer questions from other graduate students and faculty. 2780 Special Topics Students will focus on a selected topic in cellular and molecular pathology and write a paper under the directions of a faculty advisor. 2790 Directed Study This course provides the students an opportunity to carry out a specific laboratory project in any area of interest in cellular and molecular pathology. 3700 PhD Dissertation Research After advancement to candidacy for the PhD degree, students enroll in this course to pursue original experimental laboratory research, the results of which will provide the substance of their doctoral dissertation. A minimum of 40 credits of this course are required for the PhD degree in the School of Medicine. 3710 Cancer Biology and Therapeutics This course presents biochemical and clinical aspects of cancer biology and therapy, and is designed for graduate students training in the basic sciences or medicine. The lectures cover: The biology of normal and neoplastic cells, machanisms of neoplastic transformation, chemical and environmental carcinogenesis, viral oncogensis, breast a prostate cancer, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, gene therapy, tumor immunology, and nutrition and cancer.
  • 6. 3730 Topics in Experimental Neuropathology This course critically evaluates the latest scientific literature concerning diseases of the central nervous system. Emphasis will be placed on methodologies as they are applied to the study of human neurologic diseases. Participants will present scientific papers and lead the classroom discussions. This course is open to students of all levels and will include both basic scientists and clinicians (residents, faculty). HUMAN GENETICS BIOS 2041 Introduction to Statistical Methods Discusses techniques for the application of statistical theory to actual data. Topics include probability theory, estimation of parameters, and tests of hypothesis for both the discrete and continuous case EPIDEM 2110 Principles of Epidemiology Reviews the basic concepts of epidemiology including community diagnosis, analytical techniques, and evaluation of preventive methods. Examples of both acute and chronic diseases will be covered. Course includes lectures and readings. E-mail is utilized. HUGEN 2022 Human Population Genetics Deals with general principles of population genetics, especially those applicable to human populations. HUGEN 2025 Human Genetics Seminar Human Genetics seminars present current genetics methodology, theory, and data. HUGEN 2031 Chromosomes and Human Disease The role of chromosome structure and function is presented. Topics covered include cytogenetics methodology, aneuploidy, chromosome rearrangements, chromosomes and cacer, chromosome breakage syndroms, and gragile sites on human chromosomes. HUGEN 2034 Introduction to Human Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics An introduction course in human biochemical and molecular genetics with special reference to the biochemical and molecular basis of genetic diseases and the distribution of genetically determined disease susceptibility in human popluations. HUGEN 2040 This course will provide an up-to-date overview of the most common and biologically informative human inherited disorders and will integrate clinical descriptions with recent genetic, moleculat genetic and biochemical insights. Disorders covered include lysosomal storage disorders, neuromuscular diseases, organic acidopathies, amino acidopathies, neurofibromatosis, cystic fibrosis, neurodegenerative and opthalmic disorders. Current techniques of gene mapping, cloning, transfer, and expression will be integrated into the overviews.
  • 7. HUGEN 2033 Quantitative Genetics An advanced course for those who have a major interest in quantitative aspects of genetics, namely, in the genetic epidemiology of human diseases. HUGEN 2048 Linkage Analysis Human Genetics An advanced course which discusses the principles and practice of linkage analysis in human genetics. The course will cover both parametric and non-parametric approaches to linkage analysis, and includes hands-on experience with the current computer programs used for linkage analysis IMMUNOLOGY (MSIMM) 2200 MS Thesis Research A directed research project which results in a thesis for a master’s degree. *2210 Comprehensive Immunology This is a lecture course that will introduce the students to the fundamental concepts of modern immunology. The course will cover cells, tissues and organs of the immune system. Furthermore in depth analysis of the development, activation, effector functions and regulation of immune response will be presented in this course. *2230 Experimental Basis of Immunology This course will expose the students to classical and contemporary literature in modern immunology. Emphasis will be on paper analysis and critical evaluation of primary data. This course will parallel the topics presented in comprehensice immunology lecture course which must be taken before or simultaneously with experimental basis of immunology. 2290 Directed Study This course provides the students an opportunity to carry out a specific laboratory project in any area of interest in immunology. 3200 PhD Dissertation Research After advancement to candidacy for the PhD degree, students enroll in this course to pursue original experimental laboratory research, the results of which will provide the substance of their doctoral dissertation. A minimum of 40 credits of this course are required for the PhD degree in the School of Medicine. 3220 Contemporary Topics - Immunology This is an advanced level course in which students will read, present and evaluate the primary literature in immunology. Each semester will feature an integrated set of papers addressing a current issue of interest to modern immunologists. The course may be taken more than once by each student, since the topic addresses will change each semester.
  • 8. 3230 Immunology and Human Disease This course surveys basic immunological principles as they impact our understanding of the causes or treatments of human disease. The course consists of a series of lecture blocks. Background reading is required and the course relies heavily on the reading of original articles. Classes are regularly devoted to paper discussions, and each student will responsible for introducing one paper. MOLECULAR PHARMACOLOGY (MSMPHL) 2310 Principles of Pharmacology This course consists of a series of lectures and tutorial sessions which focus on the general principles of pharmacology. Major topics are principles of pharmacokinetics (including drug absorption, distribution, and metabolism) and pharmacodynamics (quantitation of drug-receptor interactions). 2350 Research Seminar Students present their research, or a recent research article from a broad range of topics selected by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor. The course meets weekly during which the student presents his/her research in progress or an article of his/her choice. Emphasis is placed on a careful analysis and critical evaluation of the manuscript as well as the development of teaching and speaking skills needed for scientific presentation. The student is expected to elucidate issues relevant to the topic and to answer questions from other graduate students and faculty. 2360 Receptors and Signal Transduction This course will explore different types of signaling pathways activated by receptor- ligand interactions. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: G-protein linked receptors, adenylate cyclases, small GTPases, kinases and phosphatases, nitric oxide, phospholipases, steroid hormone signaling, and pharmacological applications of signaling pathways. 2390 Directed Study This course provides the students an opportunity to carry out a specific laboratory project in any area of interest in pharmacology. 3300 PhD Disserataion Research After advancement to candidacy for the PhD degree, students enroll in this course to pursue original experimental laboratory research, the results of which will provide the substance of their doctoral dissertation. A minimum of 40 credits of this course are required for the PhD degree in the School of Medicine. 3310 Cancer Biology and Therapeutics This course presents biochemical and clinical aspects of cancer biology and therapy, and is designed for graduate students training in the basic sciences or medicine. The
  • 9. lectures cover: The biology of normal and neoplastic cells, machanisms of neoplastic transformation, chemical and environmental carcinogenesis, viral oncogensis, breast a prostate cancer, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, gene therapy, tumor immunology, and nutrition and cancer. 3360 Molecular Pharmacology This course examines molecular mechanisms of drug interactions with an emphasis on drugs that modulate cell signaling and cellular responses to drugs. The course will include student participation through presentatioons and discussion of relevant contemporary scientific literature. Topics include: cell cycle checkpoints and anti-cancer drugs, therapeutic control of ion channels, and blood glucose, nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory agents and arachidonic acid signaling, and molecular mechanisms of drug tolerance. Two sessions will be devoted to each topic. MOLECULAR TOXICOLOGY BIOST 2041 Introduction to Statistical Methods I Discusses techniques for the application of statistical theory to actual data. Topics include probability theory, estimation of parameters, and tests of hypothesis for both the discrete and continuous case. EOH 2101 Introduction to Research Methods I This two semester course will introduce the basic skills required to conduct idependent research in the health sciences. During the first semester emphasis will be placed on: critical review of literature, notebook keeping, exploratory data analysis, and use of the univeristy library and database resources. EOH 2107 Environmental and Occupational Health Colloquium Presentations and discussions of topics of current interest in the field of industriial environmental health sciences are covered, with participation by faculty, students, and invited guest speakers. EOH 2302 Molecular Approaches Toxicology This course is designed to introduce students to recent advances in field molecular toxicology. A basic foundation in genetics and tools of biotechnology will first be developed. Recent examples of innovative approaches used to study toxic agents at molecular level will then be described. Progress in the research of DNA/Protein adducts, xenobiotic metabolism and characterization of oncogenes will also be discussed. EOH 2304 Biomarkers and Molecular Epidemiology Elective course summarizes the concepts and biological principles underlying bases molecular biomarkers; provide students with understanding methodological principles of use; biomarkers epidemiological research relevant to study of chronic human disease and public health applications; summarize present use of specific biomarkers in
  • 10. epidemiologic and clinical research with examples in human cancer, cardiovascular, immunological, and neurological diseases. EOH 2305 Mechanisms DNA Metab DMG Repair Mechanisms and consequence of somatic and hereditary genetic damage, including methods to detect, characterize and quantitate genetics lesions. Provides molecular and theoretical basis for evaluation of genotoxicological date on exposure to mutagenetic/carcinogenic agents and on genetic predisposition or susceptibility to disease. EOH 2309 Bioorganic Toxicology The organic, inorganic and mechanistic biochemical details of interactions of toxins and biological systems will presented. Emphasis on chemical understanding of potential toxicological sequelae of such interactions. Students present one lecture on bioorganic toxicological topic synthesized from recent scientific literature. EPIDEM 2110 Principles of Epidemiology Reviews the basic concepts of epidemiology including community diagnosis, analytical techniques, and evaluation of preventive methods. Examples of both acute and chronic diseases will be covered. Course includes lectures and readings. E-mail is utilized. MOLECULAR VIROLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY (MSMVM) 2400 MS Thesis Research A directed research project which results in a thesis for a master’s degree. 2410 Molecular Virology This course stresses basic concepts of animal virology. Subjects include different viruses, the expression and regulation of viral genes, the mechanisms of viral-induced cytopathology, latency, and cell transformation, and the nature of viroids and prions. Supplementary reading assignments are required. 2420 Experimental Virology This course is designed for graduate students training in molecular virology research and is designed to provide a more in-depth study of molecular virology through a critical analysis by the student of seminal reasear publications in various systems. Paper discussion format. 2450 Research Seminar Students present their research, or a recent research article from a broad range of topics selected by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor. The course meets weekly during which the student presents his/her research in progress or an article of his/her choice. Emphasis is placed on a careful analysis and critical evaluation of the manuscript as well as the development of teaching and speaking skills needed for
  • 11. scientific presentation. The student is expected to elucidate issues relevant to the topic and to answer questions from other graduate students and faculty. 2470 Contemporary Topics in Molecular Virology and Microbiology This is a course in which students will read, present, and evaluate theprimary literature in molecular virology and microbiology. Each student will feature an integrated set of papers addressing a current issure of interest. The course amy be taken more than once by each student, since the topics addressed will continue to change each semester. 2490 Directed Study This course provides the students an opportunity to carry out a specific laboratory project in any area of interest in molecular virology and microbiology. 3400 PhD Dissertation Research After advancement to candidacy for the PhD degree, students enroll in this course to pursue original experimental laboratory research, the results of which will provide the substance of their doctoral dissertation. A minimum of 40 credits of this course are required for the PhD degree in the School of Medicine. 3410 Microbial Pathogenesis This course is an introduction to the molecular basis of bacterial and parasitic pathogenesis. Topics include 1) intro to microbial pathogens 2) molecular and classical koch’s postulates, 3) pathogen adhesion strategies 4) molecular mechanisms of invasion 5) microbial strategies for immune evasion 6) genetics and action of bacterial toxins 7) coordinate regulation of virulence factors 8) antibiotics and antibiotic resistance 9) host responses to infection 10) vaccines. 3420 Viral Pathogenesis The goal of this course is to integrate the lectures given on a particular virus in the comprehensive virology course with two additional lectures which expand the basic biology of the virus in the virus life cycle to the level of virus-host interactions. The first lecture will address the pathogenic properties of the virus from the perspective of disease manifestations, immunology, and the natural history of infection. This will be followed by a second lecture which will address the molecular basis of viral pathogenesis and current advances in antiviral research. 3430 Retrovirology Retroviruses such as HIV-1, the virus that causes aids, are currently of extreme medical significance. In this course, the complex molecular biology and biochemistry of retroviruses will be examined. The student completing this course will have an indepth understanding of the current retrovirus literature. Virology and molecular biology background required. 3440 Vaccinology
  • 12. Vaccines are widely regarded as one of the major contributors to increased life expectancy. The purpose of this course is to (1) explore the history of vaccines; (2) underscore the successful role of current vaccines in the management of infectious disease; (3) present strategies for a new generation of safe and effective molecular vaccines; and (4) discuss the ethical and economic realities of vaccine use and development. 3465 Gene Delivery The prospect of using genetically engineered viruses to infect human cells has led to the development of the science of viral vectors. This course will discuss the basic strategies for the development of viral vectors as well as their molecular biology and biochemistry. 3480 Immunology of Infectious Disease General mechanics of immunity to microbial pathogens and common strategies of immune evasion will be discussed with emphasis on detailed examples from viral, bacterial and parasitic systems. An in depth examination of survival strategies of pathogens in intracellular and extracellular host environments will be addressed, as well as the consequences of inadequate and inappropriate immune responses. NEUROBIOLOGY (MSNBIO) 2001 Neurophysiology The topics covered in this course include the electrophysiological analysis of resting and action potentials, a description of both the pre- and postsynaptic ionic mechanisms involved in synaptic transmission, and an overview of specific examples of how the cellular mechanisms described earlier in the course can be integrated ito models of the functioning of small neural networks. 2008 Pro-Seminar Each member of the program faculty presents an overview of the topic on which s/he works and the leads a discussion of a research article in that area. Critical analysis of experiments and of research is emphasized. 2100 Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology This course is a component of the introductory graduate sequence designed to provide an overview of cellular and molecular aspects of neuroscience. This course covers the electrical properties of neurons, nerve cell biology, protein chemistry, regulation of gene expression, synaptic transmission, receptor function, and second messenger signaling in a lecture format with a conference corequisite (cellular and molecular neurobiology conference). A background in basic biology is required. 2101 Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology Conference
  • 13. This course is a co-requisite to cellular andmolecular neurobiology and is organized in a conference format designed to develop critical reading skills. Students will be expected to read and discuss original scientific literature. A background in basic biology is required. 2102 Systems Neurobiology This course is a component of the introductory graduate sequence designed to provide an overview of neuroscience. The course provides an introduction to the structure of the mammalian nervous system and to the functional organization of sensory systems, motor systems, regulatory systems, and systems involved in higher brain functions. It is taught in a lecture format witha lab/conference corequisite (systems NB conference). 2103 Systems Neurobiology Conference This course is a corequisite to systems neurobiology and involves conference itegrated into a non-didactic laboratory and conference format designed to develop research skills. Students will be expected to read and discuss original scientific literature. 2135 Historical Perspectives in Neuroscience This seminar course explores the origins and evolution of modern neuroscientific concepts from the 17th and mid-20th centuries. Discussions of primary and secondary source material will focus on understanding the role of contemporary philosophical, scientific, social and technological factors in the development of neuroscientific thought. Another goal is to develop an appreciation of their contibutions to current neuroscientific dogma. 2600 MS Thesis Research A directed research project which results in a thesis for a master’s degree. 2610 Developmental Neurobiology This course provide an in-depth introduction to the field of developmental neurobiology. Topics include basic embryology, the origin of neurons and glia, cell migration, axonal growth and synapse formation, neuronal death and mechanisms underlying the formation of specific neuronal circuits. 2620 Molecular Physiology of Synapses Advanced course designed for students interested in neurophysiology, neural computation, and imaging. It covers selected topics ranging from ion channels function to synaptic transmission and computational analysis of neural circuits. Classes include diactic presentations with textbook references & discussion of original papers. Some presentations will describe biophysical methods & using computer programs for data analysis & simulation. Students will be expected to participate in classroom discussions, complete problem sets & write a term-paper that reviews a research problem. 2612 Advanced Developmental Biology This course will examine selected topics in developmental biology at an advanced level. Topics may include pattern formation in insects, cell lineage analysis, cell-cell
  • 14. interactions and the specification of cell fates, cell adhesion molecules, genetic approaches to mammalian embryogenesis and the extracellular matrix in development. Emphasis will be place on the critical reading of papers and classroom discussion. 2650 Journal Club Students present their research, or a recent article from a broad range of topics selected by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor. The course meets weekly during which the student presents his/her reserach in progress or an article of his/her choice. Emhasis is placed on a careful analyis and critical evaluation of the manuscript as well as the development of teaching and speaking skills needed for scientific presentation. The student is expected to elucidate issues relevant to the topic and to answer questions from other graduate students and faculty. 2660 Neurobiology Seminar Nationally and internationally recognized researchers in the field of neuroscience present scientific findings. Students meet informally with each speaker to discuss seminal topics. 2680 Special Topics A series of special topics courses are offered by individual members of the department or by small groups of the faculty. The general format involves the detailed analysis of a specific research area, exploring its development and current status by the presentations and discussion of research papers. NEUROSCIENCE (NEUSC) 2005 Bio Base of Neuropsych disorders This course is designed to acquaint trainees with clinical disorders of relevance to the neuroscience. Each weekly session consists of an overview lecture, a patient demonstration, and a discussion. Students are asked to participate in this course at least once prior to the comprehensive examination, usually during their second or third year.

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