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FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST



FY05-06 Budget Requests

       •   Please be succinct in your a...
FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST
       attach to the area and no fluorescence is produced when the ...
FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST
       d. Math and Science Skill Development
          Modernizing ...
FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST
           universities. Our internship program will provide additi...
FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST

       i. Collaborative/Regional Strategy
           Cooperation a...
FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST
  6.
           a. Please provide the following funding detail:



...
FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST
   conditions that are produced by chromosomal microdeletions can b...
FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST

       3. Portable Microscope and Digital Camera Array:
          ...
FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST
           a. How cost-effective is this proposal, specifically not...
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FY05-06 Budget Requests

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Transcript of "FY05-06 Budget Requests "

  1. 1. FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST FY05-06 Budget Requests • Please be succinct in your answers, limiting the responses to 3-4 sentences where possible. • Where appropriate, please reference connections to guiding principles (refer to list of guiding principles in item #4). • Priority is only used if your department is submitting more than one request. PRIORITY # REQUEST TITLE (SAME AS SECTION A) TOTAL $$ REQUESTED Biology - Introducing DNA Diagnostic Techniques and 2 Immunological Based Laboratory Assays in Bioscience 41,153.25 Laboratory Curricula 1. Please provide a brief description of this request, emphasizing the connection to workforce development or job training, and support of the ever changing economy. Biosciences are emerging as an important factor for economic growth in Arizona, particularly in the Phoenix metropolitan area. In their 2003 executive summary, the Batelle Memorial Institute emphasized the need to develop and train a bioscience workforce that would supply the demands of a fast growing bioscience community. The report stressed the mismatch in demand and supply for bioscience workers, indicating that even though “the number of biology-related majors now stands at nearly 900 annually in Arizona … these biology students are generally poorly prepared to undertake the hands-on laboratory work required in healthcare and research settings.” Batelle reported the need for “new focused efforts” to build “an educational pipeline for the biosciences,” which entails designing curricula for bioscience workforce and career development and developing internship programs for students in this field. This request aligns with Batelle’s recommendations, and it is for the purchase of equipment necessary to develop 1) a cell culture and DNA diagnosis laboratory, 2) immunological and biochemical based laboratory assays and, to incorporate 3) a portable teaching microscope and digital imaging system for student instruction and use in the Microbiology (BIO 162 and BIO 205), General Biology (BIO 181 and BIO 182), and introductory and advanced Biotechnology (BIO 107, BIO 247, BIO 249) courses. 1) Cell Culture and DNA Diagnosis Laboratory: Students will culture blood cells and prepare samples of chromosomes for detection of chromosomal microdeletions (small pieces of chromosome that are missing). The procedure combines cell culture techniques and a molecular diagnostic technique known as FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization). FISH uses a fluorescent DNA probe — a piece of DNA that has a fluorescent tag — to which chromosomes are exposed. If the same piece of DNA is not missing in the chromosome where it belongs, the DNA fluorescent probe attaches to it and fluoresces when shined. If the piece is missing the DNA fluorescent probe does not FY 2005 – 2006 Funding Request Page 1 10/10/2005
  2. 2. FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST attach to the area and no fluorescence is produced when the sample is shined. Several conditions that are produced by chromosomal microdeletions can be identified by this procedure (i.e. DiGeorge, Prader-Willi, and Angelman syndromes); FISH is a routine procedure in molecular diagnostic laboratories operating in hospital settings. 2) Immunological and Biochemical Based Laboratory Assays: By using the Multiskan plate reader (please refer to table in section 5) students will be able to perform powerful antibody-based tests used to diagnose diseases such as HIV/AIDS and SARS, track biological contamination of food and water samples, measure bacterial growth, and examine enzymatic activity. Additionally the system will enable students to record and print data for use in-class discussion, as well as out-of-class analysis and scientific report writing. 3) Portable Teaching Microscope and Digital Image System: The requested system will enable students to perform microscopic examination of disease causing agents, including bacteria and parasites, as well as visually explore the key components and structure of both plant and animal cells. In addition to in-classroom instruction, the imaging system will allow students and instructors to capture and record digital images of relevant subject matter for further examination and discussion outside of the laboratory setting. By enabling instructors to project and capture live digital images of microscopic specimens for group examination and discussion, the requested imaging system will help promote interactive, collaborative learning in both classroom and laboratory settings. Through utilization of this scientific equipment and technology, students will be able to develop hands-on microscopy skills relevant to the healthcare and biomedical research industries. 1. Batelle Memorial Institute, Arizona Bioscience Workforce Strategy: Preparing for the Future (Executive Summary), 2003 2. Please explain if the proposal addresses any/or all of the following considerations for Workforce Trends: a. Changing Demographics b. Soft Skills/Job Readiness Development c. Systems Thinking as it applies to the Workplace d. Math and Science Skill Development a. Changing Demographics The Battelle Memorial Institute report, “Preparing for the Future: Arizona Bioscience Workforce Strategy,” clearly outlines the need for a new focus on biosciences education. Battelle reports the need for “new focused efforts” to build an “educational pipeline for the biosciences” and to achieve successful program articulation in bioscience career education. Battelle recommends the development of curricula for bioscience workforce and career development, and to create an internship program to provide experiential learning for students in this exploding field. This request aligns with Batelle’s recommendations and with the Phoenix College Biology Department goal of modernizing the student laboratory experienced initiated in 2003 and already materialized to a large extent. b. Soft Skills/Job Readiness Development & c. Systems Thinking as it applies to the Workplace With new laboratory settings supported by modern equipment, computer hardware and software, we will train our students in skills that will translate across bioscience and health related industry. The courses that will be supported by this proposal are fully transferable to state and private universities. Additionally, our internship program associated with these courses will provide additional practical laboratory experience in this industry. FY 2005 – 2006 Funding Request Page 2 10/10/2005
  3. 3. FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST d. Math and Science Skill Development Modernizing the student laboratory experience in biosciences will promote overall math and science skill development among students enrolled in the courses that relate to this request. 3. Please identify the need or problem that motivated this budget request and describe how the request addresses the need or problem. Please specifically address how this request provides a rapid response to a workforce development and or job training problem, including information explaining how quickly this problem will be addressed. The Phoenix College Biology Department seeks funding to improve current laboratory courses, biosciences curriculum, and student workplace training opportunities. In today’s quickly changing workplace, it is essential for community college biology courses to integrate modern curricular concepts and to be equipped to provide a modern lab experience that is consistent with up-to-date methodologies and technologies. Our goal is to teach students current techniques so that students are prepared to enter the workplace in modern bioscience and health industry. As a department, we face three major challenges to reaching these goals. First, the routine capital funding mechanism does not provide sufficient funds to modernize laboratory facilities and equipment. Second, the lower division bioscience curriculum does not include lab skill competencies and does not adequately address interdisciplinary subjects. Third, our students have just a few internship opportunities that will enable them to gain skills in bioscience and health industry workplace. With funding from this proposal to purchase equipment, computer hardware and software applications reflecting current laboratory technologies, we immediately will move to updating the curriculum by incorporating new technology in teaching labs. We have established an internship program with several profit and non-profit bioscience and health organizations for intern placement, which include the USDA Laboratory, Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), Center for Evolutionary Functional Genomics at the ASU Biodesign Institute, and DNA Diagnostic Laboratory at St. Joseph’s Hospital. During the summer of 2005, Milen Vitanov (a BIO 181, 182, and 247 student) successfully completed an internship at TGen; we are expecting an increasing number of students emulating Milen’s steps. 4. Please review the following guiding principles. In the space below, please indicate the guiding principle (s) that are most specifically addressed by the proposal AND explain how each will be accomplished in the space provided below (refer to the plan and funding process document for definitions of the guiding principles). a. Portability of Skills b. Flexible Delivery c. Partnership Development d. Rapid Response e. Leverage Resources f. National Industry g. Unique Workforce Needs h. NewGlobal Economy Skills i. Collaborative/Regional Strategyj. State/Regional/National Recommendation a. Portability of Skills With new curriculum supported by modern equipment, computer hardware and software, we will train our students in skills that will translate across the bioscience industry. The courses that will be supported by this grant are fully transferable to state and private FY 2005 – 2006 Funding Request Page 3 10/10/2005
  4. 4. FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST universities. Our internship program will provide additional practical laboratory experience in this industry. These skills will be essential for any job in the “new economy” of Arizona. b. Flexible Delivery The Phoenix College Biology Department will adapt quickly to the changing needs of a dynamic bioscience industry. We will do this through constant communication and interaction with bioscience institutions and the universities in Arizona. The equipment, computer hardware and software that we will purchase will be adaptable to provide support for newly developing priorities. c. Partnership Development The Phoenix College Biology Department has developed partnerships with bioscience institutions in Arizona, both through our internship programs and through active communication with the universities and prospective employers of our students. We will stay on the leading edge of curriculum development and modifications in sync with academic and bio-industry trends. d. Rapid Response With adequate funding for curriculum development and the purchase of equipment, computer hardware and software applications reflecting current laboratory technologies, we immediately will move to update the curriculum to incorporate the new technology. e. Leverage Resources We intend to train our students in laboratory skills using laboratory equipment common to bioscience and bio-industry. Our goal is to affect the over 1,000 Phoenix College students that take biosciences courses from the Biology Department each year. Many of these students are minority students, and it is important to the mission of this College and of the Maricopa County Community College District to make as many opportunities available to these students as possible. We will place students as part of our internship programs, which will take advantage of existing bioscience industry and university resources to further the development of our students’ skills. f. National Industry Standards While there is no accrediting organization that directly addresses biosciences training, the standard in the bioscience labs is to provide updated and current laboratory experiences. To meet these national standards, the Phoenix College Biology Department will need the additional requested funding for equipment, computer hardware and software, and curriculum development. g. Unique Workforce Needs The bioscience workplace in Arizona is creating a unique opportunity for Phoenix College students. Our students will require focused and current laboratory skills to obtain positions in this industry. Entry level employment in bio-industry requires training on current equipment. h. New Global Economy Skills By training our students to become proficient in laboratory skills that are necessary to obtain positions in the new biosciences industry, we will directly enable them to participate in this “new economy.” FY 2005 – 2006 Funding Request Page 4 10/10/2005
  5. 5. FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST i. Collaborative/Regional Strategy Cooperation across the state is imperative for current biology education, and the universities in Arizona are actively pursuing updating the laboratory educational experience for their students. We have begun working with the ASU Molecular Biology and Biotechnology and Applied Bioscience programs, and we will continue to work with the universities to the greatest extent possible to collaborate on biology laboratory educational initiatives. The Arizona Biology Conference provides a currently existing method for this collaboration. j. State/National/Regional Recommendations The Battelle Memorial Institute report clearly calls for a new focus on biosciences education and in training our students for careers involving laboratory skills and experiential learning. This proposal responds directly to that need. 5. Please list the outcomes and/or benchmarks of the funding requested that will be used to measure the success of your proposed project. Modernizing the Student Laboratory Experience Benchmark for Completion: We will purchase the funded equipment categories. All of the instrumentation, devices, and tools outlined in this proposal will be used by biology students to develop lab skills, instrumentation experiences, and exposure to data analysis that are needed in modern bioscience labs. Students in the following courses will use the listed equipment: Applied Biosciences: Biotechnology (BIO 247); Applied Biosciences: Biotechnology Internship (BIO 249); Introduction to Biotechnology (BIO 107, entirely new course created by Phoenix College); Introductory Biology for Majors (BIO 181 and BIO 182); and Microbiology for Allied Health (BIO 162 and BIO 205). Providing Student Experiential Learning in the Bioscience Workplace Benchmark for Completion: We have successfully placed students in internships in biosciences institutions and we will continue to do so. FY 2005 – 2006 Funding Request Page 5 10/10/2005
  6. 6. FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST 6. a. Please provide the following funding detail: Check if Critical Operating or Item Description Total Cost** Component Capital Item*** Tissue Culture and FISH Diagnostic Equipment $ 13,073 Capital Imunological Laboratory Assay Equipment $ 15,626 Capital Portable Microscope and Digital Camera Array $ 12,455 Capital Total Cost of Request* $ 41,153 * Any non-faculty personnel shall be OYO, OSO or specially funded. ** Several columns are hidden but contain costs that are included in the total costs (statutory & flex benefits) ***Indicated by an “O” or “C”; please detail capital items (specify what is to be purchased) b. Please explain why each item is needed (e.g., what staff positions will do, what will be accomplished by consulting services, etc.) Summary of Equipment Needs: All of the instrumentation, devices, and tools outlined in this proposal will be used to provide biology students with the lab skill set, instrumentation experiences, and exposure to data analysis that are needed in modern bioscience labs. The equipment listed is according to the priority of need. Funding of any number of these categories will be an acceptable advancement towards our goals. 1. Tissue Culture and FISH Diagnostic Equipment: This equipment will be used to teach cell and tissue culture and DNA diagnostic techniques to General Majors Biology (BIO 181), Introductory Biotechnology (BIO 107) and Advanced Biotechnology (BIO 247 and BIO 249) students. Students will culture blood cells and prepare samples of chromosomes for detection of chromosomal microdeletions (small pieces of chromosome that are missing). The procedure combines cell culture techniques and a molecular diagnostic technique known as FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization). FISH uses a fluorescent DNA probe — a piece of DNA that has a fluorescent tag — to which chromosomes are exposed. If the same piece of DNA is not missing in the chromosome where it belongs, the DNA fluorescent probe attaches to it and fluoresces when shined. If the piece is missing the DNA fluorescent probe does not attach to the area and no fluorescence is produced when the sample is shined. Several FY 2005 – 2006 Funding Request Page 6 10/10/2005
  7. 7. FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST conditions that are produced by chromosomal microdeletions can be identified by this procedure (i.e. DiGeorge, Prader-Willi, and Angelman syndromes); FISH is a routine procedure in molecular diagnostic laboratories operating in hospital settings. Below is an itemized list and description of all the components: 1 Purifier Delta Class II, Type A2 (Laminar flow hood that provides clean air to the working area for preventing contamination) $ 5,161.20 1 Hydraulic Base Stand 50.5’’x 29’’ (Mobile and adjustable base stand for supporting the laminar flow hood) $ 1,495.88 1 Automatic CO2 Incubator, Single Chamber, IR 120V (Incubator for cultured cells) $ 4,352.29 1 Gas Analyzer 10-5000 (Measures CO2 Gas Levels inside the incubator) $ 272.53 1 Fyrite CO2 Fluid Refill 10-5057 (CO2 Gas Analyzer Refill $ 36.82 1 Fyrite Repair Kit 11-7052 (CO2 Gas Analyzer Repair Kit) $ 48.84 Sales Tax and Shipping charges $ 1,705.13 Subtotal $ 13,072.69 2. Immunological Laboratory Assay Equipment: This equipment request is for the purchase of a Multiskan plate reader system for teaching immunological and biochemical based concepts to Microbiology (BIO 162 & 205) and General Biology (BIO 181) students. A computer to run the software needed to support the plate reader and a color printer to print data and results for outside analysis are also required. The requested system includes the following components: 1 Photometer Multiskan Plate Reader (Optical density reader used for detection of immunological reactions, cell turbidity, and enzyme activity) $ 4,370.63 1 Multiskan Lamp (Replacement bulb) $ 53.55 12 50-300 µl Multichannel Transferpette (Multiple micropipette system for simultaneously transferring microvolumes) $ 7,196.04 1 Dell Latitude D510 Laptop (Supports the plate reader software) $ 1,497.67 1 Lexmark C510 Network Laser Color Printer $ 469.99 Sales Tax and Shipping Charges $ 2,038.18 Subtotal $15,626.06 FY 2005 – 2006 Funding Request Page 7 10/10/2005
  8. 8. FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST 3. Portable Microscope and Digital Camera Array: The requested system will enable students in the Microbiology (BIO 162 & 205) and General Biology (BIO 181 & 182) courses to perform microscopic examination of disease causing agents, including bacteria and parasites, as well as visually explore the key components and structure of both plant and animal cells. In addition to in-classroom instruction, the imaging system will allow students and instructors to capture and record digital images of relevant subject matter for further examination and discussion outside of the laboratory setting. By enabling instructors to project and capture live digital images of microscopic specimens for group examination and discussion, the requested imaging system will help promote interactive, collaborative learning in both classroom and laboratory settings. The total cost of the requested imaging system, including sales tax and shipping charges is $12,454.50 and includes the following components: 1 Plan Achromat microscope objective lens set (4X 10X, 40X, 100X) 1 DP70 Digital camera 1 DP70 Digital camera software PCI Card adapter Subtotal $12,454.20 7. Please identify and explain the Strategic Direction(s) of Phoenix College with which this request aligns. Refer to the following web site: http://www.pc.maricopa.edu/data/GlobalFiles/File/committees/strategic_planning/Strategic_Direction_05-06.pd f The proposed request is designed to expose students to DNA molecular diagnostic techniques and to immunological and biochemical laboratory assays. It promotes learning opportunities and training for students, especially those interested in health-related laboratory or biotechnology programs. An MCCCD/ASU Main Associate in Partnership Degree (ATP) in Biotechnology — which includes BIO 181 and BIO 247 as transferable credits — has been recently examined by ASU ATP advisors, and it is in its final phase of approval. It is expected that such transferability options into the ASU Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (MBB) program will substantially increase the enrollment of BIO 181 and BIO 247, courses that will integrate part of the requested material. The proposed request is designed to facilitate short internships for interested students, thus increasing our ability to partner with institutions outside our district. It will enhance our delivery options by enabling faculty to develop alternative learning environments and delivery options, both on and off campus. It will promote the use of multiple laboratory spaces by adding portable technologies to any location. 8. Please comment on each of the following: FY 2005 – 2006 Funding Request Page 8 10/10/2005
  9. 9. FISCAL YEAR 2005– 2006 PROPOSITION 301 FUNDING REQUEST a. How cost-effective is this proposal, specifically noting whether matching funds (in-kind or external) are committed? A full funding of this request would expend $41.15 for each of the 1,000 students currently enrolled in the biosciences courses during the year of funding. Of course, the equipment is not expendable hardware and will last through many years of student use. It is difficult to amortize the total over the life of the equipment. The number of students who will use the equipment will also be expanded over time to include other non-majors and majors courses not listed in this grant request. The Phoenix College Biology Department will use the equipment purchase funds in a fiscally responsible manner, as we intend to train our students in laboratory skills that translate across the biosciences and other industries that employ laboratory technicians, rather than spending monies on extremely specialized equipment relevant to limited activities. While we do not currently have matching funds committed, we will seek industry funding and grants for future equipment needs. This proposal will be cost effective for the Maricopa County Community College District, as the District will be able to use Phoenix College’s efforts to enact system-wide curriculum changes for biology. b. How will your unit sustain this proposal after Prop 301 funds are exhausted? Modernizing the Student Laboratory Experience: Through this proposal, the PC Biology Department will be able to purchase much of the equipment necessary to provide modern laboratory experiences. Much of the equipment we request is standard laboratory equipment that will not become obsolete for years. We will be able to maintain this equipment via limited course fees. We also will actively seek industry funding and grants to purchase additional equipment as needed to continue to meet changing industry needs. c. What value is added for economic development? Training our students in laboratory skills that will be required in the bioscience industry will ensure that these students will be able to compete in Arizona’s new bioscience industry. As the Battelle report emphasized, Arizona must develop its local workforce to attract and maintain biosciences companies. 9. Please indicate options with regards to partial or delayed funding for this request: which of the following would you do if you did not receive new funding (check appropriate box)? Phase-in over two or more years We will immediately incorporate any set of equipment that is funded to advance our lab improvements goals. FY 2005 – 2006 Funding Request Page 9 10/10/2005
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