Course Syllabus Fall
                        BIOL 6465, Immunology
                   Lecture MW, 3:30-4:45 PM, SC 214

  ...
the end of the semester before seeing me about a grade. Exams are a combination of
multiple choice and short answers. Test...
University materials, misrepresentation/falsification of University records or academic
work, malicious removal, retention...
bioscience. 12:4997-5029.
Lecture Schedule (The schedule is subject to change in case of class cancellation due to
weather, emergencies, or such; ho...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

BIOL 6465 Course Syl..

227 views
173 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
227
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

BIOL 6465 Course Syl..

  1. 1. Course Syllabus Fall BIOL 6465, Immunology Lecture MW, 3:30-4:45 PM, SC 214 Instructor: Dr. Donald McGarey Department of Biology & Physics, Kennesaw State University 325 Science and Mathematics Building PH: (770)423 - 6668 email: dmcgarey@kennesaw.edu Office hours: MW 9:00-10:00 AM, others by appointment https://files.kennesaw.edu/faculty/dmcgarey/BIOL4465 Course Description: BIOL 6465. Immunology. 3-0-3. Prerequisite: BIOL 3300; BIOL 3340 Recommended; admissions into MAT program. Immunology will explore current concepts of the immune system. Emphasis will be placed on the induction of the immune response, on the mechanisms of those responses, and on the mechanisms by which the immune system protects against disease. The development and the role of each of the components involved in the immune response as well as immunological applications will be discussed. Course Materials:  Kuby Immunology (6th edition). Kindt, Goldsby and Osborne. W.H. Freeman and Company. ISBN: 0-7167-8590-0  Assigned reading and lecture slides Course Objectives:  To understand the components of host defenses.  To understand the roles and mechanisms of innate and adaptive defenses.  To understand the impact of the defenses to an individual and how to optimize them.  To understand past, present and future applications of immunology.  To fulfill the lecture requirements of this course.  Demonstrate your ability to incorporate your knowledge of immunology into the Biology courses you teach. Evaluation The final average grade is calculated from a possible total of 500 points:  300 from 3 lecture exams (100 points/exams; different from undergrad exams)  200 points from a cumulative final exam  50 point Research paper/class lecture  A = 500-450 points; B = 449-400; C = 399-350; D = 349-300; F = 299-below All students concerned with exam and/or assignment grades are encouraged to discuss them with me. Do not wait several weeks after your graded work is returned or until
  2. 2. the end of the semester before seeing me about a grade. Exams are a combination of multiple choice and short answers. Test material is taken from the lectures and reading. Immunology is a junior/senior course. It is neither taught at the graduate level, nor the introductory level. The only way to pass the course is to learn and apply immunology at a minimum of 70% of what the instructor requires. Lecture Attendance Policy: Contrary to the rumor that most University instructors/professors are “out to fail as many students as possible”, we are more interested in your success than failure. I would like to see all students succeed; however, every point must be earned in the courses I teach so expect to put in the work. It is my job to help you master the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed if you are ready and willing. This will require your regular attendance and class participation; however, it is your choice to attend the class or not. You will also be required to read the text book and assigned articles. Lecture slides may be available on-line through the instructor’s web-site; however, this is not an on-line class and regular attendance is the only guaranteed way of getting all the course lecture material and hand-outs. Information will be presented in the class that is not included on the web-site. If an exam is missed due to illness or an emergency, a make-up exam may be taken no later than 2 days (if possible) after the original exam was given (requires written proof of incapacitating illness or emergency, excuses will be verified). False documentation will be grounds for immediate failure of the course and subject to the penalties defined by academic dishonesty. Excuses including alarm clock failure, death of a boy-friend or girl-friend's relative, self-diagnosed illnesses, unverifiable car failure and such will result in a grade of 0 for the exam. If you arrive late to an exam, you will have the remaining normal class time to finish the exam only if no one has finished the exam and left the room before you arrive. Contact me as soon as possible either by phone, e-mail or in person if you have a legitimate reason for delaying the exam. The make-up exams will vary from the original. Courtesy  Please turn off all phones, pagers, alarms and other audible electronic devices before entering the class or lab.  Lectures may NOT be tape recorded.  During exams, no electronic devices are to be used in any capacity. If you need to keep time, do so with a wrist watch. If you are expecting an important call related to an emergency situation, please let the instructor know before the class. Academic Integrity Every KSU student is responsible for upholding the provisions of the Student Code Conduct, as published in the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs. Section II of the Student Code of Conduct addresses the University’s policy on academic honesty, including provisions regarding plagiarism and cheating, unauthorized access to
  3. 3. University materials, misrepresentation/falsification of University records or academic work, malicious removal, retention, or destruction of library materials, malicious or intentional misuse of computer facilities and/or services, and misuse of student identification cards. Incidents of alleged academic misconduct will be handled through the established procedures of the University Judiciary Program, which includes either an “informal” resolution by a faculty member, resulting in a grade adjustment, or a formal hearing procedure, which may subject a student to the Code of Conduct’s minimum one semester suspension requirement. Academic Withdrawal Policy Students may withdraw from one or more courses anytime before the last three weeks of the semester. However, as of Fall 2004, students will be allowed a maximum of eight total withdrawals if they enter KSU as a freshman. Transfer students will be allowed one withdrawal per fifteen credit hours attempted, for a maximum of eight. Students who choose to pursue a second degree at KSU will be allowed two additional withdrawals. Students who entered KSU before the Fall of 2004 will be allowed one withdrawal per fifteen credit hours attempted for a maximum of eight. To withdraw, the student should complete an official withdrawal form in the Office of the Registrar. Students who officially withdraw from courses on or before the last day (October 13, 2006) to withdraw without academic penalty will receive a “W”. Students who officially withdraw after the last day to withdraw without academic penalty (and before the last three weeks of the semester) will receive a “WF”, which will be counted as an “F” in calculation of their grade point average. Students with Disabilities Each student who requests adaptations or accommodations under section 504 of the American Disabilities Act must make make the request through the KSU Disabled Student Support Services (ext. 6443) located on the 2nd floor of the Carmichael Student Center (ST 267). Only requests through the office of Disabled Student Support Services will be honored. No exceptions. Assigned Readings 1. Vitetta, L., B. Anton, F. Cortizo and A. Sali. 2005. Mind-Body Medicine: Stress and its impact on overall health and longevity. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 1057: 492-505. 2. Smith, T.P., S.L. Kennedy, and M. Fleshner. 2004. Influence of age and physical activity on the primary in vivo antibody and T cell-mediated responses in men. J. Appl Physiology. 97: 491-498. (available through http://jap.physiology.org) 3. Li, P., Y-.L. Yin, D. Li, S. W. Kim, and G. Wu. 2007. Amino acids and immune function. Brit. J. Nutr. 98: 237-252. 4. Hance, K.W., C.J. Rogers, S.D. Hursting, and J.W. Greiner. 2007. Combination of physical activity, nutrition, or other metabolic factors on vaccine response. Frontiers in
  4. 4. bioscience. 12:4997-5029.
  5. 5. Lecture Schedule (The schedule is subject to change in case of class cancellation due to weather, emergencies, or such; however, all attempts will be made to adhere to this schedule). Date: Topic: Text: Aug 15 Syllabus & Introduction Aug 20 Overview Chap 1 Aug 22 Overview Chap 1 Aug 27 Overview Chap 1 Aug 29 Cells and Organs Chap 2 Sept 3 Labor Day Holiday, No Classes Sept 5 Cells and Organs Chap 2 Sept 10 Cells and Organs Chap 2 Sept 12 Innate Immunity Chap 3, 7, 13 Sept 17 Innate Immunity Chap 3, 7, 13 Sept 19 Innate Immunity Chap 3, 7, 13 Sept 24 Exam I Sept 26 Adaptive Immunity: T-cells Chap 9, 10 Oct 1 Adaptive Immunity: T-cells Chap 9, 10 Oct 3 Adaptive Immunity: T-cells Chap 9, 10 Oct 8 Adaptive Immunity: B-cells Chap 7 Oct 10 Adaptive Immunity: B-cells Chap 7 Oct 11 Last Day to Withdraw w/o Academic Penalty Oct 15 Adaptive Immunity: Antibody Chap 4-6 Oct 17 Adaptive Immunity: Antibody Chap 4-6 Oct 22 Exam II Oct 24 Cytokines Chap 12 Oct 29 MHC and Antigen Presentation Chap 8 Oct 31 MHC and Antigen Presentation Chap 8 Nov 5 Cell-Mediated Responses Chap 14 Nov 7 Immune Responses to Infectious Agents Chap 18 Nov 12 Immune Responses to Infectious Agents Chap 18 Nov 14 Vaccines Chap 19 Nov 19 Exam III Nov 21 Fall Break-No Class Nov 26 Immune Problems Chap 15, 16 Nov 28 Immune Problems Chap 17 Dec 3 Immune Problems Chap 20, 21 Dec 10 Final Exam, 3:30-5:30 pm, SC214

×