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2011 Partnership Opportunities
2011 Partnership Opportunities
2011 Partnership Opportunities
2011 Partnership Opportunities
2011 Partnership Opportunities
2011 Partnership Opportunities
2011 Partnership Opportunities
2011 Partnership Opportunities
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2011 Partnership Opportunities

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  • 1. CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY SOCIETY SCHOOL IN SYSTEMIC AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES Boston MA S S AC H U S E T T S 2011 Partnership Opportunities Clinical Immunology Society, National O ce 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3823, USA tel: 414.224.8095, fax: 414.272.6070, e-mail: info@clinimmsoc.org, web: www.clinimmsoc.org
  • 2. Boston MA S S AC H U S E T T S Clinical Immunology Society 2010-2011 Council Listing President Appointed Councilors Steven M. Holland, MD Antonio Condino-Neto, MD PhD National Institute of Allergy and University of Sao Paulo About the Infectious Diseases, NIH Sao Paulo, SP, BRAZIL Clinical Immunology Society Bethesda, MD Kim Isaacs, MD PhD The mission of the Clinical Immunology University of North Carolina Society is to facilitate education, Past President Chapel Hill, NC translational research and novel Carl H. June, MD approaches to therapy in clinical University of Pennsylvania Samia J. Khoury, MD immunology to promote excellence in Philadelphia, PA Brigham and Women’s Hospital the care of patients with immunologic/ Boston, MA in ammatory disorders. President-Elect Toshinori Nakayama, MD, PhD CIS is an international professional Matthias G. von Herrath, MD Chiba University organization which includes more La Jolla Institute of Allergy and Chiba , Japan than 600 clinicians, investigators and Immunology trainees. CIS is governed by a Council La Jolla, CA Luigi D. Notarangelo, MD consisting of an elected Executive Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical Committee and appointed Councilors. Secretary-Treasurer School Boston, MA The Clinical Immunology Society, Daniel C. Adelman, MD established in 1986, is devoted to University of California, San Francisco Hideho Okada, MD, PhD fostering developments in the science San Francisco, CA University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and practice of clinical immunology. Pittsburgh, PA The primary objectives and purposes of Elected Councilors this Society are: Lawrence B. Schwartz, MD PhD Editor-in-Chief, Clinical Virginia Commonwealth University Immunology • To facilitate the interchange of ideas Richmond, VA Andrew Saxon, MD and information among physicians UCLA School of Medicine and other investigators who are John M. Routes, MD Los Angeles, CA concerned with immunological/ Medical College of Wisconsin in ammatory diseases; Milwaukee, WI Website Medical Editor • To promote research on the causes Donald B. Kohn, MD Robert A. Eisenberg, MD and mechanisms of diseases University of California, Los Angeles University of Pennsylvania relating to the immune system and, Los Angeles, CA Philadelphia, PA as a result, to unify concepts of disease pathogenesis; • To encourage investigators and clinicians to share in their knowledge of immunologically active drugs and other interventions; • To promote application and dissemination of recent advances in biomedical science for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases related to immunity and in ammation; and • To foster excellence in research and medical practice. 2
  • 3. 2011 Partnership Opportunities Clinical Immunology Society School in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases Overview Faculty The 7th School in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, to be held The 2011 invited faculty consist of the following individuals: March 31 – April 3, 2011 in Boston, represents one of several Co-Chairs: educational initiatives by CIS. Trainee participation in the School is George C. Tsokos, MD essential and is fostered by an outstanding educational program Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center by allowing trainees to be active presenters. The anticipated size of Boston, MA the School is approximately 35 participants, which is ideally suited Vasileios Kyttaris, MD to expose young scientists to leaders in the eld, yet provide Harvard Medical School opportunities for trainees to present their work at a premier Boston, MA conference on autoimmune diseases. Support for the School will allow education, networking, and professional advancement of Faculty: trainees in the eld of immunology. Jose C. Crispin-Acuna, MD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center The School is geared towards fellows-in-training (within their last Boston, MA two years of training). Participants should be rheumatologists, Betty Diamond, MD internists, or scientists committed to the clinical management of Feinstein Institute for Medical Research patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. These candidates Manhasset, NY may have backgrounds in immunology, adult medicine, Robert P. Kimberly, MD rheumatology, hematology, laboratory immunology, or University of Alabama at Birmingham allergy/immunology. Birmingham, AL The overarching goal of the School is to educate fellows on the Barry Lee Myones, MD Baylor College of Medicine diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment of systemic autoimmune Houston, TX diseases. A secondary goal is to attract and develop future scientists in academic medicine, and to enhance the awareness of Gabriel Panayi, ScD MD clinical immunology and its importance in scienti c discoveries Guy’s Hospital London, United Kingdom and clinical applications. Peter H. Schur, MD The School is an intensive course of study that encourages Harvard Medical School active participation. The fellows are required to present a case Boston, MA study or research project to the group, and facilitate a discussion Nan Shen, MD of their ndings. Topics can focus on state of the art established Jiao Tong University School of Medicine treatments, laboratory approaches, pathogenesis and/or future Shanghai, China biologics with an emphasis on new treatments that are Yehuda Shoenfeld, MD under development. Chaim Sheba Medical Center Ramat-Gan, Israel Eleven faculty members, who are leaders in systemic Richard Siegel, MD PhD autoimmunity, will give didactic presentations, act as mentors and National Institutes of Health o er career advice to the fellows. To enhance learning, one faculty Bethesda, MD member is assigned to each fellow’s case study/research project to o er constructive feedback independent of the group discussion. School History The School provides rigorous academics in an informal, relaxed environment. This fosters camaraderie among faculty and fellows April 1-5, 2009 March 15-19, 2006 enabling the fellows to develop professional career networks with Boston, MA Santa Fe, NM peers and current industry thought leaders. April 2-6, 2008 March 2-6, 2005 Boston, MA Santa Fe, NM The SAID School is a perfect example of the CIS mission in action, which is to facilitate education, translational research March 14-18, 2007 March 18-21, 2004 and novel approaches to therapy in clinical immunology and to Santa Fe, NM Santa Fe, NM promote excellence in the care of patients with immunologic/ in ammatory disorders. 3
  • 4. Boston MA S S AC H U S E T T S Clinical Immunology Society School in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases School Justi cation Selection Process Approximately 50 million Americans, 20 percent of the population CIS contracts with Scholar One to provide an on-line or one in ve people, su er from autoimmune diseases. application submission site speci cally designed for the school. Interested applicants will create an account within the There are over 100 known autoimmune diseases and they are on-line site and upload their abstract, career statement as to recognized singularly rather than in the overall category of why the school would be bene cial, CV/educational resume, autoimmunity. Therefore, each disease is treated by the medical and letter of support from the training program director or specialty that covers the particular anatomical part which is head of department. Abstracts are submitted on the topic involved in a disease. In the area of autoimmune diseases, which of autoimmunity and are then reviewed by the faculty. An crosses multiple specialties, it becomes clear that there must be emphasis is placed on including women and minorities among cross-fertilization of scienti c information in order to develop the reviewers as well as physicians in each specialty relating to e ective treatments that will treat the cause of these diseases, autoimmune diseases. not just the symptoms. It is therefore necessary to conduct multidisciplinary scienti c symposia to facilitate this vital cross- Once the abstract submission has closed, the faculty are fertilization of research information. provided access to all submitted applications for review. They score each application based on the credentials of the candidate, This lack of knowledge and collaborative e ort results in level of training, letter of recommendation and the amount of untold su ering for persons with autoimmune diseases due to interest in the abstract. The faculty score the applications on a misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis which may result in damage 1-5 scale, with 1 being the highest score and 5 being the lowest to vital organs. The need to bring a national focus to autoimmunity score. There is also a mechanism for reviewers to disqualify as the common factor in all autoimmune diseases is vital in order themselves from scoring the abstract due to a con ict of interest. to bring a collaborative e ort to research, funding, early detection, and eventually, prevention and cure for all autoimmune diseases. After all abstracts are scored by the faculty, the scores are averaged and sent back to the reviewers. The top 20-25 abstract A survey conducted by the American Autoimmune Related authors are selected to attend the school and receive a travel Diseases Association (AARDA) found that the average patient award. The Co-Chairs of the school do have the option of using diagnosed with a serious autoimmune disease had seen over their judgment to modify the selection of the award winners, in four doctors over a four-year period before a correct diagnosis order to ensure diversity of awards among di erent topic areas, was made. Physicians have been trained to be specialists rather geographic regions, and academic institutions. than generalists. General practitioners have little training in autoimmunity, yet they usually are the rst physicians that Career Planning / Mentoring patients see. In some autoimmune diseases, the window of opportunity to treat aggressively the serious manifestation of Each participant is assigned a faculty member to serve as a an autoimmune disease is lost before the patient is seen by a “mentor” throughout the School. Each faculty mentor reviews specialist. Major organs are seriously damaged before appropriate their assigned fellow’s presentation prior to the School to o er treatment begins. any constructive feedback in order to enhance the discussion. Time is set aside for a career planning discussion at which time Target Audience the fellows may interact with their mentor in a casual setting Participants should be in the last two years of training and must to gain advice on their future career choices. Past participants hold an MD, PhD or equivalent; these individuals should be noted that they received great advice from the faculty regarding rheumatologists, internists, or scientists committed to the clinical their future career choices and enjoyed this networking management of patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. opportunity. Many of the faculty members stay in contact with These candidates may have backgrounds in immunology, adult their fellows well after the School has ended and continue the medicine, rheumatology, hematology, laboratory immunology, or mentoring process. allergy/immunology. Twenty participants were selected to attend the 2009 school. Eight of these individuals were from the US and twelve were international participants. Nine of the participants were male and eleven female. Countries represented included: Argentina, Australia, Bulgaria, China, Finland, Germany, India, Israel, Netherlands, Philippines, Switzerland, and the United States. 4
  • 5. 2011 Partnership Opportunities Clinical Immunology Society School in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases Promotion Non-structured Observation The eleven faculty members will be participant observers. Their One of CIS’ major initiatives is education; therefore we will make feedback will focus on fellows’ participation, behavior, peer a concerted e ort to widely publicize the Summer School to interaction, etc. The sampling will not be random but purposeful, those working in the autoimmune eld. We plan to advertise the and will aid in determining the curriculum and content structure Summer School in the following ways: for subsequent programs. • Ask faculty to distribute information to their fellows; CIS is responsible for administering, monitoring and • Post information on the CIS website (The CIS home page implementing the School’s activities, and will carry out all receives more than 45,000 visitors each year making reporting requirements. The program outcomes will be compiled the website a valuable tool to advertise the school. The and organized into a report for the CIS board of directors and education pages of the website also continue to be the participating faculty members. The outcomes will determine most viewed pages as well as receiving the most downloads possible corrective actions for future SAID Schools. from those who visit the website); • Post messages to the CIS list serves; Outcomes • Send broadcast emails to CIS database (The CIS database contains over 3,000 contacts that will receive this important • 100% of fellows will increase their knowledge of diagnosing information from Save the Dates to abstract submission and treating systemic autoimmune diseases; information regarding the school. Included in these emails • 100% of fellows will increase their awareness of clinical will be those physicians who have previously attended a CIS immunology processes as they relate to systemic School or Satellite). autoimmune diseases and its importance in scienti c discoveries and clinical application; and, In addition, CIS will request the following societies to • 90% of fellows will pursue academic careers in systemic also publish information on their respective websites and autoimmune diseases. disseminate the information to their members: • American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Comments from past School fellows include: (AAAAI) • Enjoyed open atmosphere conducive to discussion. • American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, Inc. • Excellent mixture of basic science and clinical topics. (AARDA) • Great meeting. Faculty were very friendly, learned a lot. • American College of Rheumatology (ACR) • I was very impressed not only by faculty but fellow talks. • Autoimmunity Research Foundation • This school is very interesting for me. I’ve appreciate a lot • Federation of Clinical Immunology Societies (FOCIS) your work and the time that you spent for us. Thank you. • For me, the school was a unique possibility to meet fellows Proceedings and faculty from all over the world with a common interest in immunology. I had the feeling to be part of a big family at the For those speakers who grant permission, handouts of the end of the course which shows how much I liked it being part slides will be available in the nal program distributed to all of the school. attendees as well as a link to the slides on the CIS website. CIS • Good experience/great opportunity for learning and future also currently works with Autoimmunity Reviews who publishes prospective views for career development issue was an a special issue/supplement from the school that includes short interesting topic. reviews from the presentations. • Incredibly well organized, relevant information presented in a stress-free collegial environment. Evaluation of the School Both qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques will be used to assess the School’s operations including pre and post- tests, attendee surveys, and structured observation. Pre- and Post-Tests The pre- and post-tests will measure the success of the outcomes. The results will generate impact data of the school and indicate possible changes in the curriculum for subsequent programs. A set of 5 – 10 questions will be administered when the fellows arrive and the same questions will be administered prior to their leaving to measure the knowledge gained. 5
  • 6. Boston MA S S AC H U S E T T S Clinical Immunology Society School in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases Partnership Bene ts Management of Grants • Opportunity to send one company representative to the The ultimate decision regarding the management of grants, School as an observer and network with faculty and fellows; including the receipt and disbursement of funds, is the • Opportunity for logo placement on meeting bags and/or responsibility of CIS. Grants from supporters will be paid directly lanyards; to CIS. Both the grantors and CIS will conform to the terms of • Opportunity to distribute items on-site to attendees; the letter of agreement they sign. • Logo placement on sponsor page in the program and on It is customary for CIS to use grant funds to reimburse for faculty on-site signage; travel, lodging, and incidental expenses associated with the • Logo placement on the CIS website under the appropriate planning and implementation of CIS educational programs. Grant school page; monies may support administrative, rental, marketing, mailing • Access to the mailing list of School attendees and faculty. and all other associated activity planning, development and implementation costs. Support may be used for meals and social Right of First Refusal events held as part of such activities. Scholarships or other special Current sponsors are presented the opportunity to extend funding support to permit students, fellows, etc. to attend select activities for continuing programs before new sponsors are eligible. may be provided as long as their selection is made by CIS. CIS Logo Use For further information of supporting CIS educational programs, please contact Michelle Roach, CIS Associate Director of Only sponsors of o cial CIS programs will be allowed to use Programs, at 414.224.8095 or mroach@clinimmsoc.org. the CIS name and logo in the promotion and marketing of their sponsorship. All such usage must rst be approved by CIS. The use of the CIS name and logo will be permitted to show the appropriate a liation the sponsor has with the program. Past School Attendees 2004 Fellows Dimitrios Daoussis, MD Vasileios Kyttaris, MD Nancy Walker, MD University Of Patras School Of Harvard Medical School Univ. Of Massachusettes Medical Stacy Ardoin Medicine Boston, MA School Duke University Medical Center Patras, Greece Worchester, MA Kathleen Maksimowicz- Durham, NC Kevin Deane, MD McKinnon, MD Klaus Warnatz, MD Chistine Bernal University of Colorado The Cleveland Clinic Foundation University Hospital Freiburg Baylor College Of Medicine Aurora, CO Cleveland, OH Freiburg, Germany Houston, TX Petros Efthimiou, MD Abigail Smukler, MD Andrew S. Zeft, MD Beate Berner Hospital for Special Surgery Toledo Clinic Rheumatology The University of Utah Case Western Reserve University New York, NY Toledo, OH Salt Lake City, UT Cleveland, OH Todd Funkhouser, MD PhD Judith A. Stebulis, MD El Paseo, TX University MA Medical School Bonnie Bidinger, MD Worchester, MA 2005 Fellows Univ. Of Massachusettes Medical Roopali Gandhi, PhD School Brookline, MA Sophia Steer, MD Sheetal Chhaya, DO Worchester, MA ARC Clinical Lecturer Cleveland, OH Iulia Circiumaru Grillo, MD Nathalie Burg London, United Kingdom North Kingstown, RI Lorinda Chung, MD The Rockefeller University Katsuya Suzuki, MD PhD Stanford University Medical New York, NY Mary M. Klote, MD Center Saitama Medical Center, Saitama Walter Reed Army Medical Center Stanford, CA Richard Chou, MD PhD Medical University Great Falls, VA Milton, MA Chuo-ku,Tokyo, Japan Giovanni Franchin, MD, PhD Michael Kno ach Feinstein Institute for Medical Jose C. Crispin-Acuna, MD Anthony Michael Turkiewicz, University Clinics Innsbruck Research Beth Israel Deaconess Medical MD Innsbruck, Austria Manhasset, NY Center Birmingham, AL Boston, MA 6
  • 7. 2011 Partnership Opportunities Past School Attendees Koichi Fujii, MD PhD Yaniv Sherer, MD Gabriela Hernandez-Molina, MD 2007 Fellows University of Occupational and Sheba Medical Center Instituto Nacional De Ciencias Environmental Health Tel-Hashomer, Israel Medicas Y Nutricion SZ Zoul a Allakhverdi, PhD Kitakyushu, Aukuoka Mexico City, D.F. CHUM Research Ctr., Notre-Dame Takeshi Suzuki Hospital Japan Mexico University of Tsukuba Montreal, Quebec Nathanael Horne, MD Tsukuba, Ibaraki Frances Humby, MRCP Canada New York, NY Japan London, United Kingdom Rozana Gasparello Almeida, MD Diane L. Kamen, MD Ingo Helmut Tarner, MD Uriel Katz, MD, PhD Rio De Janeiro, Brazil Medical University of South Bad Nauheim, Germany Sheba Medical Center-Ramat Carolina Akaluck Thatayatikom, MD Gan-Israel Simone Appenzeller, MD PhD Charleston, SC University of Kentucky Tel Hashomer, Israel McGill University Lexington, KY Montreal, PQ Christina Katsiari, MD, PhD Michael P. Keith, MD Canada Athens University Medical School Jennifer K. Turner, MD Arlington, VA Athens, Greece Children’s Hospital & Regional Edward M. Behrens, MD Eduard Ling, MD PhD West Chester, PA Medical Center Shannon Kearney, DO Soroka University Medical Center Seattle, WA Colin Edgerton, MD Bethlehem, PA Beer Sheva, Israel Maria Pia Zanartu C., MD Eisenhower Army Medical Center Nancy Kim, MD Bernadete L. Liphaus, MD Evans, GA Hospital Clinico Universidad De Northeastern University Sao Paulo, Brazil Chile Boston, MA Santiago, Chile Ana Paola Lotito, MD Jennifer Frankovich, MD Adina Kay Knight, MD Children’s Institute-University of Stanford University Birmingham, AL Sao Paulo 2006 Fellows Sao Paulo, Brazil Stanford, CA Maggie Larche, PhD Noboru Hagino, MD Kennedy Institute of Danielle Brinkman, MD Eyal Muscal, MD University of Tokyo Rheumatology Leiden, Netherlands Baylor College of Medicine Tokyo, Japan London, United Kingdom Houston, TX Japan Alice D. Chang, MD Huifang Lu, MD PhD University of California, Los Marc D. Natter, MD Nigil Haroon, MBBS MD DM University of Texas Angeles Arlington, MA Toronto Western Hospital Houston, TX Los Angeles, CA Toronto, ON Catalina Orozco, MD Christine Matijasic, DO Canada Vaidehi R. Chowdhary, MD Dallas, TX Suny Downstate Medical Center Mayo Clinic Bret R. Haymore, MD MC USA New York, NY Pantelis Panopalis, MD Rochester, MN Kensington, MD University of California, San Duane Pearson, MD Cong-Qiu Chu, MD PhD Francisco Claas Hinze, MD University of Colorado Health Oregon Health and Science San Francisco, CA Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Sciences Center University Cincinnati, OH Denver, CO Julie Patel, MD Portland, OR Baylor College of Medicine Aviva Katzav, PhD Frank Pessler, MD PhD Guo-Min Deng, MD, PhD Houston, TX Sheba Medical Center Philadelphia, PA Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Tel-Hashomer, Israel Siba P. Raychaudhuri, MD Martina Prelog, MD Center Palo Alto, CA Jing Li, MD PhD Medical University Innsbruck Boston, MA Innsbruck, Austria Hendrik Schultz, MD Xiang Ya Hospital, Central South Iglika Djoumerska-Alexieva, University University of Iowa Hospitals and Elisa Rhew, MD MD, PhD Chang Sha, Hu Nan, Peoples Clinics Northwestern University Inst. Microbiology, Bulgarian Republic of China Iowa City, IA Chicago, IL Acad. Science So a, Bulgaria Matthew Stoll, MD, PhD Jan Lin, MD PhD Marta Rizzi, MD PhD UCLA Children’s Hospital, Boston Uniklinik Freiburg Teresa Giani, MD Los Angeles, CA Boston, MA Freiburg, Germany University of Florence Florence, Italy Katsue Sunahori, MD Almut Meyer-Bahlburg, MD Tatiana So a Rodriguez-Reyna Hannover Medical School Okayama University Mexico City, Mexico Alison Gizinski, MD Hannover, Germany Okayama, Japan University of Colorado Health Adriana Maluf Elias Sallum Yvonne Rengel, MD Sciences Ctr. Hidekata Yasuoka, MD, PhD Sao Paulo, Brazil Center of Experimental Aurora, CO Keio University School of Medicine Ladislav Senolt Tokyo, Japan Rheumatology Institute of Rheumatology Zurich, Switzerland Prague 2, Czech Republic 7
  • 8. Boston MA S S AC H U S E T T S Past School Attendees Julia Rhiannon, MD Mark P Gorman, MD Heinrike Schmeling, MD Mike Recher, MD University of Washington Children’s Hospital Boston The Hospital for Sick Children, Clinical Immunology Seattle, WA Boston, MA University of Toronto Zurich, Switzerland Toronto, Ontario Victoria Shanmugam Christian M. Hedrich, MD Julia Roteta Rocamora, MD Canada Georgetown University Hospital Children’s Hospital Dresden Hospital Durand Great Falls, VA Fetscherstrasse 74, Germany Brian J Skaggs, PhD Ciudad Autónoma De Buenos UCLA Aires, Capital Federal Melissa R. Snyder, PhD Kunihiro Ichinose, MD PhD Los Angeles, CA Argentina Mayo Clinic College of Medicine Graduate School of Biomedical Rochester, MN Sciences, Nagasaki University Shirley Y Wang, MD Anatoly Rubtsov, PhD Nagasaki, Japan OUHSC NJH Laura Su, MD PhD Edmond, OK Denver, CO Stanford University Keiichi Iwanami, MD Palo Alto, CA University of Tsukuba Pamela F Weiss, MD Anna Maria Schilder, MD Tsukuba, Ibaraki Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia VUMC Joost Swart, MD Japan Philadelphia, PA Amsterdam, Noord-Holland VU University Medical Center Netherlands Amsterdam Hanna Jarva, MD PhD The Hague, Netherlands University of Helsinki 2009 Fellows Catharina Schuetz, MD MSc Helsinki, Finland Ulm University Tamilselvam Tiruchengode, Uri Moshe Arad, MD, PhD Ulm, Germany MD Adriana A Jesus, MD Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center Madras Medical College University of São Paulo, Pediatrics Padmanabha Shenoy D., MBBS Tel Aviv, Israel Chennai-3, Tamilnadu São Paulo, Brazil MD India Zhu Chen, MD Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Ankur A Kamdar, MD Anhui Provincial Hospital Institute of Medical Science Nikolay Tzaribachev, MD Baylor College of Medicine Hefei, Anhui (SGPGIMS) University Children’s Hospital Houston, TX Peoples Republic of China Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh Tuebingen, Baden-Wuerttemb Marina N Magrey, MD India Germany Victoria Dimitriades, MD Case Western Reserve University Louisiana State University Health Yun-Jeong Song, MD Elisaveta Voynova, PhD Strongsville, OH Science Center NIH Stefan Angelov Institute of Britta Maurer, MD New Orleans, LA Rockville, MD Microbiology University Hospital of Zurich So a, Bulgaria Karuna Keat, MBBS Andrey Tchorbanov, PhD Zurich, Switzerland Campbelltown Hospital Institute of Microbiology - Xiangshu Wen, MD PhD Jay Mehta, MD Campbelltown, Australia Bulgarian Academy of Sciences UCLA Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia So a, Bulgaria Los Angeles, CA Eliisa Kekäläinen, MD Philadelphia, PA University of Helsinki, Haartman Joseph C. Turbyville, MD Stephen J Murphy, MD Institute Walter Reed Army Medical Center 2008 Fellows UCHSC Helsinki 14, Finland Washington, DC Petya Dimitrova, PhD Denver, CO Sun Jung Kim Evan Glenn S. Vista, MD Institute of Microbiology Jana Pachlopnik Schmid, MD Feinstein Institute for Medical St. Luke’s Medical Center So a, Bulgaria PhD Research Noveleta, Cavite, Philippines Francesca Ferrera, PhD Inserm U768 Manhasset, NY Marjo Vuorela, MD University of Genoa Paris, France Christina Feitosa Pelajo, MD Päijät-Häme Central Hospital Genoa, Italy Gecilmara Pileggi, MD Tufts Medical Center Helsinki, Finland Maria Miranda Garcia, MD Medical University of Sao Paulo Boston, MA Hospital De Ninos JM De Los Rios Sao Paulo, Brazil Andrea Ramirez, MD San Antonio De Los Altos, Distrito Shadi Rashtak, MD Baylor College of Medicine capita Mayo Clinic College of Medicine Houston, TX Venezuela Rochester, MN Clinical Immunology Society, National O ce 555 East Wells Street, Suite 1100, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3823, USA tel: 414.224.8095, fax: 414.272.6070, e-mail: info@clinimmsoc.org, web: www.clinimmsoc.org 8

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