Overview Introduction CMA, RMA & EEZ Offshore:    Permits / Petrobras / Opposition / Update Onshore    Permits / TAG...
Introduction
CMA, RMA & EEZ   Crown Minerals Act:       Crown assumed ownership of all petroleum & minerals in 1939, Sir Apirana     ...
Offshore Drilling
   Brazillian company Petrobras    was in 2010 given a    12,330km2 five-year oil and    gas exploration permit by NZ    ...
Petrobras P36, March 2001“Petrobras has established new global benchmarks for the generation of exceptional shareholder we...
Petrobras Wall of Shame                                 2011-2012   oil leak from another well at Roncador field, 500m fr...
Opposition
Opposition
Opposition
Opposition
Onshore Drilling
History of Onshore Exploration East Coast basin is 120,000 sq km between East Cape and Kaikoura, and about half the area,...
Permit 38348                                        Te PExpires: 7/11/2011                                   To           ...
Te KarakaPermit 50940Expires: 2/4/2014Area: 274.7 SQKMLocation: East CoastBasin                                   Whan    ...
Company Profiles
How does mining happen?1. Government issues a permit2. Land owners negotiate access3. Council issues Resource Consents
What are the benefits?Probable:1. a few local jobs2. some increase in local economic activity3. government royaltiesPossib...
What are the risks?Risk                               Likelihood   Impactpolluted surface water/waterways   High         M...
Where to from here?- ongoing efforts for greater participation and transparency in  consents, monitoring and reporting pro...
Where to from here?
Extractive Industries on the East Coast: Green Drinks Rotorua, April 2012
Extractive Industries on the East Coast: Green Drinks Rotorua, April 2012
Extractive Industries on the East Coast: Green Drinks Rotorua, April 2012
Extractive Industries on the East Coast: Green Drinks Rotorua, April 2012
Extractive Industries on the East Coast: Green Drinks Rotorua, April 2012
Extractive Industries on the East Coast: Green Drinks Rotorua, April 2012
Extractive Industries on the East Coast: Green Drinks Rotorua, April 2012
Extractive Industries on the East Coast: Green Drinks Rotorua, April 2012
Extractive Industries on the East Coast: Green Drinks Rotorua, April 2012
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Extractive Industries on the East Coast: Green Drinks Rotorua, April 2012

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A presentation to the monthly 'Green Drinks' network in Rotorua on the recent exploration activities of multinational petroleum companies operating around the East Coast of New Zealand, central government facilitation and local communities resistance.

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Extractive Industries on the East Coast: Green Drinks Rotorua, April 2012

  1. 1. Overview Introduction CMA, RMA & EEZ Offshore:  Permits / Petrobras / Opposition / Update Onshore  Permits / TAG&Apache / Opposition / Update What can we do?
  2. 2. Introduction
  3. 3. CMA, RMA & EEZ Crown Minerals Act:  Crown assumed ownership of all petroleum & minerals in 1939, Sir Apirana Ngata strongly opposed this move  Petroleum Act replaced in 1991 by CMA  2006 four national hui to identify sensitive areas for Maori  Currently being reviewed to relax regulations Resource Management Act:  Delegates most environmental regulatory authority to regional councils (out to 12 nautical mile boundary)  Councils delegate most responsibilities to staff  Significant public interest not grounds for notification Exclusive Economic Zone:  No legislation, Bill currently with Select Committee, submissions closed.
  4. 4. Offshore Drilling
  5. 5.  Brazillian company Petrobras was in 2010 given a 12,330km2 five-year oil and gas exploration permit by NZ Government. The permit area starts 4 km off the East Coast out to 110 km. Three stages to the permit:  Stage 1 – Gathering 2D seismic data  Stage 2 – Gathering 3D seismic data  Stage 3 – If proven viable Petrobras will drill an exploratory well.
  6. 6. Petrobras P36, March 2001“Petrobras has established new global benchmarks for the generation of exceptional shareholder wealththrough an aggressive and innovative programme of cost cutting on its P36 production facility…”
  7. 7. Petrobras Wall of Shame 2011-2012 oil leak from another well at Roncador field, 500m from Nov 2011 spill (Apr 2012); two offshore oil spills: one small and one undisclosed amount (Mar 2012); Petrobras rig fire, oil and drilling fluid spill off Rio (Mar 2012); 30 barrels spilt from a Petrobras rig off Rio on (Feb 2012); 160 barrels of oil leaked from Petrobras platform offshore from Sao Paulo (Jan 2012) death of another Petrobras employee and injury of two others in a Boxing Day accident on the PUB-03 oil rig in offshore waters in Rio Grande do Norte state (Dec 2011) Police say material dumped in the river from Petrobras refinery violated the limits set by environmental law. a spill from a project co-owned by Petrobras and Chevron spewed 3,000 barrels of oil into the sea and took a week to get under control. Local government authorities have taken a civil lawsuit against the polluters claiming US$11billion in damages. Petrobras worker killed and his colleague badly disfigured from a refinery explosion in Argentina that was similar to another fatal accident two years earlier. major incident in the Gulf of Mexico involved a deep sea riser coming loose with a 130 tonne buoy narrowly missing another rig as the company prepared to start the first new extraction since the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Had the break happened a few days later when oil had started pumping, analysts claim it could have resulted in a disaster similar to the BP oil leak in 2010.
  8. 8. Opposition
  9. 9. Opposition
  10. 10. Opposition
  11. 11. Opposition
  12. 12. Onshore Drilling
  13. 13. History of Onshore Exploration East Coast basin is 120,000 sq km between East Cape and Kaikoura, and about half the area, comprising the Raukūmara Peninsula, Hawke’s Bay, Wairarapa, and Marlborough, is onshore. More oil and gas seeps than elsewhere in New Zealand. The phenomenon was known to Māori and attracted the attention of European prospectors from the 1880s onwards.  Two wells sunk at Waitangi Hill in 1874 and 1875, but, while there were indications of high-pressure gas and oil, the company folded under financial difficulties the following year.  South Pacific Petroleum also sank its first wells at Waitangi Hill, with one producing enough oil to cart downhill and sell at Gisborne.  A new site on the Waingaromia valley floor was tried in 1884 and oil was encountered, producing between 20 and 50 barrels per day. In late 1887, escaping gas was ignited by the boilers and the wooden rig burned down. The rig was rebuilt, but investors had lost confidence and the company closed in 1890. However, Waingaromia remains the most productive oil well drilled in the East Coast basin to date.
  14. 14. Permit 38348 Te PExpires: 7/11/2011 To BaArea: 1606 SQKMLocation: East CoastBasinOperation Name:Waitangi Hill Whatatutu TolMinerals: Oil,Condensate, LPG,Petroleum, Gas Te Karaka Whangara
  15. 15. Te KarakaPermit 50940Expires: 2/4/2014Area: 274.7 SQKMLocation: East CoastBasin Whan ManutukeOperation Name:Onshore Gisborne areaMinerals: Oil,Condensate, LPG, MuriwaiPetroleum, Gas
  16. 16. Company Profiles
  17. 17. How does mining happen?1. Government issues a permit2. Land owners negotiate access3. Council issues Resource Consents
  18. 18. What are the benefits?Probable:1. a few local jobs2. some increase in local economic activity3. government royaltiesPossible:1. significant number of local jobs2. high increase in local economic activity
  19. 19. What are the risks?Risk Likelihood Impactpolluted surface water/waterways High Mediumpolluted land High Mediumpolluted underground aquifers Low Highpolluted air High Mediumsignificant earthquakes Low Low?social impacts Guaranteed Mediumcultural impacts Guaranteed Higheconomic impacts Guaranteed Mediumgreenhouse gas emissions Guaranteed High
  20. 20. Where to from here?- ongoing efforts for greater participation and transparency in consents, monitoring and reporting processes- building support for moratorium on fracking (at least till the PCEs report is released), with eventual bans in some areas- increased accountability in company operations- avoiding/minimizing damage to the environment and natural resources- protecting local residents affected by fracking and oil/gas operations
  21. 21. Where to from here?

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