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Management, Hitt, Black, Porter, Vahdi Boydaş, Mensur Boydaş
 

Management, Hitt, Black, Porter, Vahdi Boydaş, Mensur Boydaş

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Management, Hitt, Black, Porter, Vahdi Boydaş, Mensur Boydaş

Management, Hitt, Black, Porter, Vahdi Boydaş, Mensur Boydaş

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  • Note to student: To print these slides: <br /> Select File/Print <br /> Under “Print What,” select your preference (suggested: handouts, either 3 or 4 or 6 per page) <br /> Under “Color/grayscale,” select either “Color” for a color printer or “Pure Black and White” for a black and white printer. <br /> Do NOT select “Grayscale,” as your slides will not be legible. <br />

Management, Hitt, Black, Porter, Vahdi Boydaş, Mensur Boydaş Management, Hitt, Black, Porter, Vahdi Boydaş, Mensur Boydaş Presentation Transcript

  • PowerPoint slides by Susan A. Peterson, Scottsdale Community College Chapter 8: Managing Diverse Human Resources m a n a g e m e n t 2e H i t t / B l a c k / P o r t e r
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 2 Learning Objectives After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Explain why maximizing the potential of the firm’s human resources is important for both a company’s human resource management department and all managers Explain how a firm’s human resource capabilities affects its strategy Highlight the key aspects of getting the right people in the right jobs Outline the effective methods for selecting job candidates
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 3 Learning Objectives Highlight the keys to effective socialization and training Describe various methods for providing employees feedback on their performance Discuss the various compensation and reward systems commonly used by firms Discuss why managing diversity is increasingly important in the light of globalization
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 4 Managers Perform HR Functions All managers – even outside the HR department – must be able to: Recruit and select the right people Effectively socialize and train people in your unit Evaluate their performance Determine reward systems that will motivate them to perform at a high level Help subordinates further develop to advance in their careers
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 5 Strategic Role of HRM Firm’s ability to survive and prosper is increasingly a function of the human resources they have Managers’ career success depends on how well they manager their firm’s resources
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 6 General Framework of HRM Environment External Internal Environment External Internal Organization Strategy Organization Strategy Competitive Advantage Competitive Advantage Human Resource Management Activities Planning, Job Analysis, Recruiting, Selecting, Socializing and Training, Job Design, Performance Appraisal, Compensation, Development Human Resource Management Activities Planning, Job Analysis, Recruiting, Selecting, Socializing and Training, Job Design, Performance Appraisal, Compensation, Development Adapted from Exhibit 8.1
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 7 HRM Activities Two main HRM goals Getting the right people Maximizing their performance and potential Failure of either goal can influence the success or failure of the other
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 8 Getting the Right People: Planning Planning Forecasting demand Assessing supply Formulating fulfillment plans
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 9 Getting the Right People: Job Analysis Job Analysis Scope and depth of jobs Requisite skills, abilities, and knowledge that people need to perform their jobs successfully Job description Job specification
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 10 Getting the Right People: Recruiting Recruiting Job posting Advertisements Employment agencies Employee referrals School placement centers Internet recruiting
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 11 Getting the Right People: Selection Written tests Background and reference checks Physical examinations Selection Techniques Interviews Work sampling Work simulation Assessment centers Selection Techniques
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 12  Plan the interview by reviewing the candidate and the job specifications  Establish rapport with a friendly greeting and start the interview with a nonjob question  Follow structured set of questions  Avoid questions that require or solicit a simple yes or no response  Try not to telegraph, or give cues for, the desired answer  Make sure the candidate has plenty of time to answer— do not monopolize the conversation Tips for Interviewers Adapted from Exhibit 8.2
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 13  Listen carefully and paraphrase key candidate answers to be sure you understand what they meant to say  Ask for specific, not general, examples of the candidate’s experience and accomplishments  Leave time at the end of the interview to answer questions from the candidate  At the close make sure the candidate knows what the next steps are and approximate timing  After the candidate leaves, review your notes and highlight important points while they are fresh in your mind Tips for Interviewers (cont.) Adapted from Exhibit 8.2
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 14 Prepare for the interview by researching the company through articles and its own Web site Smile and provide a warm greeting and firm handshake if the interviewer extends his or her hand Make sure that your overall appearance (hair style, clothing, makeup, and so on) match the nature of the business and culture of the company Watch your nonverbal behavior to ensure that you maintain good eye contact and convey enthusiasm without being overly expressive with your hands or other body movements Tips for Interviewees Adapted from Exhibit 15.3: Tips for Interviewees Adapted from Exhibit 8.3
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 15 Try to solicit the interviewer’s needs early in the interview Early in the interview be sure to get a complete picture of the job through questions such as “Can you tell about what has led people to succeed in this job in the past?” Explicitly relate yourself and capabilities to the interviewer’s needs through statements such as, “You mentioned that one of the keys to this position is the ability to motivate others. In my experience at XYZ. . . .” Tips for Interviewees (cont.) Adapted from Exhibit 15.3: Tips for Interviewees Adapted from Exhibit 8.3
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 16 Take your time before answering; you do not need to begin talking the instant the interviewer asks a question Conclude the interview by thanking the person for the opportunity and expressing your interest in the company and the position Tips for Interviewees (cont.) Adapted from Exhibit 15.3: Tips for Interviewees Adapted from Exhibit 8.3
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 17 Key Aspects of Getting the Right People Adapted from Exhibit 8.4 Job AnalysisJob Analysis Planning Forecasting demand   Estimating supply Determining fulfillment Planning Forecasting demand   Estimating supply Determining fulfillment RecruitingRecruiting SelectingSelecting
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 18 Maximizing Performance: Socialization and Training Socialization and Training OrientationOrientation On-the-Job TrainingOn-the-Job Training Off-the-Job TrainingOff-the-Job Training Technical, Interpersonal, and Conceptual Training Technical, Interpersonal, and Conceptual Training
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 19 On-the-Job Training Techniques Expanded Responsibilities Expanded Responsibilities Expands the job duties, assignments, and responsibilities of an individual Expands the job duties, assignments, and responsibilities of an individual Job Rotation Job Rotation Moves individuals to various types of jobs within the organization at the same level or next-immediate-higher level for a specific period of time Moves individuals to various types of jobs within the organization at the same level or next-immediate-higher level for a specific period of time Staff Development Meetings Staff Development Meetings Held offsite to discuss facts of each individual’s job and to develop ideas for improving job performance Held offsite to discuss facts of each individual’s job and to develop ideas for improving job performance “Assistant to” Positions “Assistant to” Positions Serve as staff assistants to higher-skill level jobs for a specified period of time to become more familiar with the higher-skilled positions in the organization Serve as staff assistants to higher-skill level jobs for a specified period of time to become more familiar with the higher-skilled positions in the organization Adapted from Exhibit 8.5
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 20 On-the-Job Training Techniques (continued) Problem Solving Conferences Problem Solving Conferences Held to solve a specific problem being experienced by a group or the organization as a whole Held to solve a specific problem being experienced by a group or the organization as a whole MentoringMentoring A guide or knowledgeable person higher up in the organization helps a new employee “learn the ropes” of the organization and provides other advice A guide or knowledgeable person higher up in the organization helps a new employee “learn the ropes” of the organization and provides other advice Special Assignments Special Assignments Special tasks or responsibilities are given to an individual for a specified period of time Special tasks or responsibilities are given to an individual for a specified period of time Company Trainers Company Trainers Special programs can cover such topics as safety, new personnel procedures, new product or services, affirmative action, and technical programs Special programs can cover such topics as safety, new personnel procedures, new product or services, affirmative action, and technical programs Adapted from Exhibit 8.5
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 21 On-the-Job Training Techniques (continued) Outside Consultants Outside Consultants Recognized experts are brought to the company to conduct training on such topics as goal setting, communications, assessment techniques, safety, and other current topics Recognized experts are brought to the company to conduct training on such topics as goal setting, communications, assessment techniques, safety, and other current topics Consultant Advisory Reviews Consultant Advisory Reviews Experts in specialized fields meet with various managers and employee groups to investigate and help solve particular problems Experts in specialized fields meet with various managers and employee groups to investigate and help solve particular problems Reading Matter Reading Matter A formal program is created to circulate books, journals, selected articles, new business material, and so on to selected employees A formal program is created to circulate books, journals, selected articles, new business material, and so on to selected employees ApprenticeshipApprenticeship Training is provided through working under a journeyman or master in a craft Training is provided through working under a journeyman or master in a craft Adapted from Exhibit 8.5
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 22 Training Objectives Understanding correct and incorrect behaviors Understanding correct and incorrect behaviors Knowledge of why certain behaviors are correct or incorrect Knowledge of why certain behaviors are correct or incorrect Opportunities to practice desired behaviors Opportunities to practice desired behaviors Feedback on performance Feedback on performance Opportunities to practice and improve Opportunities to practice and improve
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 23 Maximizing Performance: Job Design Job design: structuring or restructuring of key components of a job, including the job’s responsibilities Job sharing Reengineering
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 24 Maximizing Performance: Performance Appraisals Performance appraisal Graphic rating scales Behaviorally anchored rating scales 360-degree feedback Effective performance feedback Critical incidents
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 25 Graphic Rating Scale Employee name: Dept. 1. Quality of work 2. Quantity of work 3. Cooperation 4. Dependability 5. Initiative 6. Job knowledge 7. Attitude Excellent Good Average Fair Poor Adapted from Exhibit 8.6
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 26 Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale Position: Job dimensions: Plans work and organizes time carefully so as to maximize resources and meet commitments Even though this associate has a report due on another project, he or she would be well prepared for the assigned discussion on your project 9 8 7 This associate would keep a calendar or schedule on which deadlines and activities are carefully noted, and which would be consulted before making new commitments Adapted from Exhibit 8.7
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 27 Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (cont.) Plans and organizes time and effort primarily for large segments of a task. Usually meets commitments, but may overlook what are considered secondary details. As program chief, this associate would make arrangements for enlisting resources for a special project reasonably well, but would probably omit one or two details that would have to be handled by improvisation 6 5 4 This associate would meet a deadline in handing in a report, but the report might be below usual standard if other deadlines occur on the same day the report is due This associate’s evaluations are likely not to reflect abilities because of overcommitments in other activities Adapted from Exhibit 8.7
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 28 Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (cont.) Appears to do little planning. May perform effectively, despite what seems to be a disorganized approach, by concerted effort, although deadlines may be missed. This associate would plan more by enthusiasm than by timetable and frequently have to work late the night before an assignment is due, although it would not be completed on time 3 2 1 This associate would often be late for meetings, although others in similar circumstances do not seem to find it difficult to be on time This associate never makes a deadline, even with sufficient notice Adapted from Exhibit 8.7
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 29 Performance Appraisal Interview 1. Review key work objectives, goals, or standards against which the employee’s performance is measured Review work objectives Review work objectives
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 30 Performance Appraisal Interview 2. Summarize employee’s overall performance by reviewing specific positive and negative incidents Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Review work objectives Review work objectives
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 31 Performance Appraisal Interview 3. Discuss causes of weak performance and listen carefully to the employee’s explanation Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Review work objectives Review work objectives Discuss causes of poor performance Discuss causes of poor performance
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 32 Performance Appraisal Interview 4. Discuss alternative means of improving future performance and encourage employee input Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Review work objectives Review work objectives Discuss causes of poor performance Discuss causes of poor performance Agree on process for future improvement Agree on process for future improvement
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 33 Performance Appraisal Interview 5. Establish an agreed approach, timetable, and review process for future improvement Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Review work objectives Review work objectives Discuss causes of poor performance Discuss causes of poor performance Agree on process for future improvement Agree on process for future improvement Discuss alternatives for improving Discuss alternatives for improving
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 34 Performance Appraisal Interview 6. Establish key objectives, timetables, and standards for the upcoming performance period Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Review work objectives Review work objectives Objectives for next performance period Objectives for next performance period Discuss causes of poor performance Discuss causes of poor performance Agree on process for future improvement Agree on process for future improvement Discuss alternatives for improving Discuss alternatives for improving
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 35 Performance Appraisal Interview 7. Leave the meeting on an encouraging and positive note Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Summarize overall performance (critical incidents) Review work objectives Review work objectives Objectives for next performance period Objectives for next performance period Discuss causes of poor performance Discuss causes of poor performance Agree on process for future improvement Agree on process for future improvement Discuss alternatives for improving Discuss alternatives for improving End with encouragement End with encouragement
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 36 Maximizing Performance: Compensation Compensation Pay - Pay structure - Wage or salary - Broadband system - At-risk system or variable - Incentive plans Benefits - Cafeteria-style plans Rewards and motivation
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 37 Pay Structure: Traditional Structure Job evaluation points Monthlypay $8,000 $7,000 $6,000 $5,000 $4,000 $3,000 $2,000 $1,000 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 Traditional Pay Structure Adapted from Exhibit 8.8
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 38 1 2 3 Pay Structure: Broadband Job evaluation points Monthlypay $8,000 $7,000 $6,000 $5,000 $4,000 $3,000 $2,000 $1,000 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 Broadband Pay Structure Adapted from Exhibit 8.8
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 39 Maximizing Performance: Employee Development and Labor Relations Career paths - Cross-functional job rotation Promotion Termination Layoffs Labor relations
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 40 Managing a Diverse Workforce Ethnic diversity Gender and diversity - Glass ceiling Sexual harassment
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 41 U.S. Workforce Demographic Changes, 1980–2020 18% 37% 0.8% 63% 10% 13% 2% 17% 0.6% 82% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 1980 2000 2020 African Americans Hispanics/Latinos Asian Americans Native Americans Whites Adapted from Exhibit 8.9
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 42 Projected Changes in the U.S. Population by Age and Ethnicity, 2000-2020 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 to 17 18 to 24 25 to 44 45 to 64 65+ Whites Hispanic/Latinos African Americans Asian Americans Adapted from Exhibit 8.10
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 43 Major U.S. Federal Laws and Regulations Thirteenth Amendment Thirteenth Amendment Abolished slaveryAbolished slavery All individualsAll individuals Court SystemCourt System Fourteenth Amendment Fourteenth Amendment Provides equal protection for all citizens and requires due process in state action Provides equal protection for all citizens and requires due process in state action State actions (e.g., decisions of governmental organizations State actions (e.g., decisions of governmental organizations Court SystemCourt System Civil Rights Acts of 1866 and 1871 Civil Rights Acts of 1866 and 1871 Grant citizens right to make, perform, modify, or terminate contracts and enjoy all benefits, terms, and conditions of the contractual relationship Grant citizens right to make, perform, modify, or terminate contracts and enjoy all benefits, terms, and conditions of the contractual relationship Employers engaged in interstate commerce Employers engaged in interstate commerce EEOCEEOC ActAct Enforcement Agency Enforcement Agency CoversCoversRequirementsRequirements Adapted from Exhibit 8.11
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 44 Equal Pay Act of 1963 Equal Pay Act of 1963 Requires that men and women performing equal jobs receive equal pay Requires that men and women performing equal jobs receive equal pay Employers with 15 or more employees working 20 or more weeks per year, labor unions, and employment agencies Employers with 15 or more employees working 20 or more weeks per year, labor unions, and employment agencies EEOCEEOC Title VII of CRATitle VII of CRA Provides equal protection for all citizens; requires due process in state action Provides equal protection for all citizens; requires due process in state action State actions (e.g., decisions of governmental organizations State actions (e.g., decisions of governmental organizations Court SystemCourt System Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 Prohibits discrimination in employment against individuals 40 years of age or older Prohibits discrimination in employment against individuals 40 years of age or older Employers with 15 or more employees working 20 or more weeks per year; labor unions; employment agencies; federal government Employers with 15 or more employees working 20 or more weeks per year; labor unions; employment agencies; federal government EEOCEEOC Major U.S. Federal Laws and Regulations (continued) ActAct Enforcement Agency Enforcement Agency CoversCoversRequirementsRequirements Adapted from Exhibit 8.11
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 45 Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Requires affirmative action in the employment of individuals with disabilities Requires affirmative action in the employment of individuals with disabilities Government agencies; federal contractors and subcontractors with contracts greater than $2,500 Government agencies; federal contractors and subcontractors with contracts greater than $2,500 OFCCPOFCCP Americans with Disabilities Act Americans with Disabilities Act Prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities of 1990 Prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities of 1990 Employers with more than 15 employees Employers with more than 15 employees EEOCEEOC Executive Order 11246 Executive Order 11246 Requires affirmative action in hiring women and minorities Requires affirmative action in hiring women and minorities Federal contractors and subcontractors with contracts greater than $10,000 Federal contractors and subcontractors with contracts greater than $10,000 OFCCPOFCCP Adapted from Exhibit 15.8: Major U.S. Federal Laws and Regulations Related to Human Resource Management Major U.S. Federal Laws and Regulations (continued) ActAct Enforcement Agency Enforcement Agency CoversCoversRequirementsRequirements Adapted from Exhibit 8.11
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 46 Family and medical leave Act of 1993 Family and medical leave Act of 1993 Requires employers to provide 12 weeks of unpaid leave for family and medical emergencies Requires employers to provide 12 weeks of unpaid leave for family and medical emergencies Employers with more than 50 employees Employers with more than 50 employees Department of Labor Department of Labor Adapted from Exhibit 15.8: Major U.S. Federal Laws and Regulations Related to Human Resource Management Major U.S. Federal Laws and Regulations (continued) ActAct Enforcement Agency Enforcement Agency CoversCoversRequirementsRequirements Civil Rights Act of 1991 Civil Rights Act of 1991 Prohibits discrimination (same as Title VII) Prohibits discrimination (same as Title VII) Same as Title VII, plus applies Section 1981 to employment discrimination cases Same as Title VII, plus applies Section 1981 to employment discrimination cases OFCCPOFCCP Adapted from Exhibit 8.11
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 47 Managing Diversity Today Potential problems with diversity: Communication problems and misunderstandings Mistrust Conflict and incompatible approaches to resolving the conflict Lower group cohesiveness and greater subgroup formation How to leverage diversity: Know yourself Prepare yourself and your employees Provide support Guide behavior
  • © 2008 Prentice-Hall Business Publishing 48 Where the Workers Are 33% 25% 17% 67% 75% 83% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 1950 1990 2025 Developed Countries Developing Countries Percentageofworkerslocatedin developedanddevelopingcountries Adapted from Exhibit 8.12