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The Use of Social Media Technologies on Management of the National and Regional Obesity Crisis
 

The Use of Social Media Technologies on Management of the National and Regional Obesity Crisis

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The Use of Social Media Technologies on Management of the National and Regional Obesity Crisis ...

The Use of Social Media Technologies on Management of the National and Regional Obesity Crisis
Daniel A. Terreros MD, PhD
Holly E. Russo, RN, MSN, MSECS

Mano y Corazón Binational Conference of Multicultural Health Care Solutions, El Paso, Texas, September 27-28, 2013

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  • http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/127/2/260AHA Scientific StatementApproaches to the Prevention and Management of Childhood Obesity: The Role of Social Networks and the Use of Social Media and Related Electronic Technologies A Scientific Statement From the American Heart AssociationJennifer S. Li, MD, MHS, Chair; Tracie A. Barnett, PhD; Elizabeth Goodman, MD; Richard C. Wasserman, MD; Alex R. Kemper, MD; on behalf of the American Heart Association Atherosclerosis, Hypertension and Obesity in the Young Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, and Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism
  • Several Internet-based randomized trials have been performed in overweight children and adolescents. An et al54 performed a systematic review of studies published in peer-reviewed journals that used randomized, controlled trials via the Internet and reported weight loss, BMI change, physical activity, and dietary intake as outcome variables. Studies were included only if the Internet intervention was directed toward study participants or their families, not solely toward healthcare providers. Eight studies were included. Studies were variable in their use of social media as the main agent of therapy or as an adjunct to other types of therapy, including nutrition and physical activity engagement. Six of these studies suffered from small sample size (n=35–80),56–60 and 3 studies were from the same cohort of patients.58,59,61 Doyle et al57 and Celio et al56 demonstrated a reduction in BMI z scores in those receiving an interactive Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral program compared with those receiving usual care with basic information provided on nutrition and physical activity. Baranowski et al,60 however, did not show any significant difference in girls randomized to a monthly Internet intervention and those receiving no Internet intervention; however, both groups also attended a special 4-week summer day camp, and there was a significant difference in the baseline mean BMI between the Internet intervention group (21.1±4.4 kg/m2) and the control group (26.3±7.9 kg/m2). White et al61 and Williamson et al58,59 studied the same cohort, demonstrating that active family-based behavioral Internet interventions resulted in more loss of body weight and lower dietary fat intake than passive primary health education. The Internet-based interactive program included e-mail counseling on self-monitoring, problem solving, goal setting, and relapse prevention. Compared with a noninteractive program, greater efficacy was seen in the interactive program. In 2 larger studies, Marks et al62 studied 359 adolescent girls and did not demonstrate any significant difference between subjects receiving intervention over the Internet and those receiving a print workbook, with both groups improving in the degree of physical activity, self-efficacy, and intentions. Haerens et al63 studied 2991 seventh and eighth graders, randomizing them to receive a computerized, tailored intervention either with or without parental involvement or to a control group with no intervention. In girls, the 1- and 2-year differences in BMI and BMI z score in the intervention with parents group were significant. There was a significant sex interaction with no positive intervention effect seen in boys. Recently, a school-based, randomized, controlled trial in rural Louisiana was implemented within 14 schools using a student Web site, an Internet counselor Web site, and an Internet counseling process. The Internet intervention contained lessons on health eating and regular physical activity, and students communicated with a counselor through a chat room and e-mail.64 This study was focused on the prevention of weight gain. In summary, findings from these studies have been mixed, with some finding improvement.56–58,61 Interpreting the effectiveness of these interventions and the role of social networks is challenging because of the small sample sizes, the variations in treatment provided to the intervention and control groups, the outcome measures, and the duration of follow-up. Furthermore, there was variable use of the Internet-based interventions, raising questions about the degree to which the interventions led to meaningful virtual social networks. Two other larger trials had similar limitations and had mixed results.62,63 Although some of these studies focused on the prevention of abnormal weight gain and the treatment of overweight and obesity, studies also need to be performed on the maintenance of appropriate weight once weight loss is achieved. Of note, attrition rates affect the overall power of the studies. Log-on rates, which are measures of program use, are highly variable. E-mail reminders, financial incentives, and the provision of a Web master to help participants with technical difficulties can have positive effects on the log-on rate.65
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The Use of Social Media Technologies on Management of the National and Regional Obesity Crisis The Use of Social Media Technologies on Management of the National and Regional Obesity Crisis Presentation Transcript

  • The Use of Social Media Technologies on Management of the National and Regional Obesity Crisis Clinical Science Background: Daniel A. Terreros MD, PhD Social Systems Technologies: Holly E. Russo, RN, MSN, MSECS
  • Lecture Aims • Why obesity is now considered a disease and which are its molecular causes! • Understand Social Media in Health Care! • Social Media has a place in Obesity Management! • Trends in ownership and use of smartphones, tablets, computers! • Use of apps in tracking food consumption, exercise and more! • Combining social networks with other applications! • Interactive Gaming Engagement! • What has been studied thus far and where do we need to continue to explore; the future!
  • Obesity Crisis!
  • Obesity Causes Metabolic Syndrome and T2D
  • Obesity is Main Cause of T2D
  • Professor David Barker Type 2 diabetes mellitus: The thrifty phenotype hypothesis. Diabetologia 35:595‐601 1992 “Nutrition at certain stages of pregnancy programs the fetus… for more efficient utilization and storage of energy” The Thrifty Genotype Single-Hit Hypothesis
  •  Obesity is a state of inflammation  Cytokines TNF alpha, and IL6 are elevated in obesity and cause genetic programing to Type 2 diabetes  Malnutrition is a state of inflammation  Cytokine IL-6 is elevated in malnutrition and causes genetic programing to type 2 diabetes The El Paso Epigenetic Nutritional Hypothesis: “Both Malnutrition and Obesity at Certain Stages of Pregnancy and through Inflammatory Cytokines Programs the Fetus for a more Efficient Utilization and Storage of Energy” D.A. Terreros The Borderland Paradox
  • Nutrition and Obesity Epigenetic Programing Paradox • Malnourished Mother • Obese Mother High IL-6 Low Glucose Low Insulin High TNF High IL-6 High Glucose H or L Insulin Low Birth Weight High Birth Weight Epigenetic Driven Teen and Adult Obesity Insulin &GFs
  • Epigenetic Two-Hit Obesity Crisis Hypothesis Malnutrition-i.e. Inmigrant s &Others Obesity- Following Border Generations EL Paso’s Future ? Increased HC Expenditures, Less HC Access and Lower Productivity
  • Lecture Aims • Why obesity is now considered a disease! • Understand Social Media in Health Care! • Social Media has a place in Obesity Management! • Trends in ownership and use of smartphones, tablets, computers! • Use of apps in tracking food consumption, exercise and more! • Combining social networks with other applications! • Interactive Gaming Engagement! • What has been studied thus far and where do we need to continue to explore; the future!
  • Social Media in Healthcare • The term social media refers to the use of Web-based and mobile technologies that are commonly used for interaction and communication within networks. • Research underscores strong associations between participation in social networks and preventive health behavior. • Alters may provide emotional support, instrumental support (financial or practical), informational support, or appraisal (decision-making) support.
  • Digital Social Integration and Capital • Social integration, can increase access to health information and promote self-worth and self-care on the basis of societal norms and expectations. • Social capital has been defined as the resources obtained by a group or an individual through a network of social relationships, as well as the number and quality of the relationships in the network.
  • Lecture Aims • Why obesity is now considered a disease! • Understand Social Media in Health Care! • Social Media has a place in Obesity Management! • Trends in ownership and use of smartphones, tablets, computers! • Use of apps in tracking food consumption, exercise and more! • Combining social networks with other applications! • Interactive Gaming Engagement! • What has been studied thus far and where do we need to continue to explore; the future!
  • Obesity and Social Media • An analysis of the Framingham Heart Study, which included only adults, found that spouses, siblings, and friends were at greater risk for obesity if their alters were obese. • Among children and adolescents, body mass index (BMI) is associated with school-based friendship clusters; school friends are significantly similar in terms of their BMI, with friends of the highest BMI appearing to be most similar.
  • Digital Integration of Obesity Population Control • Internet-based programs and other electronic technologies have been used in both the treatment and prevention of overweight and obesity in youth. • Benefits from these interactive electronic interventions include their widespread availability in the school and home, popularity among youth, ability to engage and immerse participants, and ability to provide immediate tailored feedback.
  • Obesity Digital in Community Integrative Programs • Obesity-related health behaviors are also associated with adolescent social networks, including participation in organized sports, fast food consumption, and computer/video game screen time. • Social networks therefore may be critical in shaping young people’s eating behaviors and body weight and vice versa, and their role suggests the potential of social network–based health promotion interventions. • Combining social network analysis with environmental assessment can identify interventions for childhood obesity treatment or prevention. • Geocaching, an activity during which individuals or groups search for items described on Web sites using navigational tools, such as GPS tracking devices, also leverages social networks and the built environment to increase physical activity • In addition to targeting existing social networks, future interventions could be based on the development of social networks purposefully developed to address obesity.
  • Lecture Aims • Why obesity is now considered a disease! • Understand Social Media in Health Care! • Social Media has a place in Obesity Management! • Trends in ownership and use of smartphones, tablets, computers! • Use of apps in tracking food consumption, exercise and more! • Combining social networks with other applications! • Interactive Gaming Engagement! • What has been studied thus far and where do we need to continue to explore; the future!
  • Adult Statistics • 59% of U.S. Adults have looked online for health information. • 60% of U.S. adults say they track their weight, diet, or exercise online. • 85% of U.S. adults own a cell phone. Of those, 53% own smartphones. • One in three cell phone owners (31%) have used their phone to look for health information. Source: Fox, S & Duggan M. Mobile Health 2012. Pew Internet and Life Project . Published November 8, 2012 Trends in Adulth Ownership of Media
  • Trends in Teens Ownership of Media • 78% of teens now have a cell phone, and almost half (47%) of those own smartphones. • One in four teens (23%) have a tablet computer, a level comparable to the general adult population. • Nine in ten (93%) teens have a computer or have access to one at home Source: Madden, M., Lenhart,A., Duggan M.,Cortesi, S., and Gasser, U. Teens and Technology 2013. March 13, 2013. Pew Research Center and Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University
  • Lecture Aims • Why obesity is now considered a disease! • Understand Social Media in Health Care! • Social Media has a place in Obesity Management! • Trends in ownership and use of smartphones, tablets, computers! • Trackers of Health Data • Use of apps in tracking food consumption, exercise and more! • Combining social networks with other applications! • Interactive Gaming Engagement! • What has been studied thus far and where do we need to continue to explore; the future!
  • Who is Tracking Health Data • The Pew Internet survey shows that people living with one or more chronic conditions are no more likely than other U.S. adults to track their weight, diet, or exercise routine. • Nearly half (45%) of U.S. adults are dealing with at least one chronic condition. • In the general population, women and men are equally likely to report tracking their weight, diet, or exercise routine. • Non-Hispanic whites and African Americans are more likely than Latinos to track these basic health indicators: 62%, 59%, and 51% of each group respectively do so. • Sixty-eight percent of college graduates track their weight, diet, or exercise routine, compared with 54% of adults with a high school diploma and 43% of those who have not graduated from high school.
  • Lecture Aims • Why obesity is now considered a disease! • Understand Social Media in Health Care! • Social Media has a place in Obesity Management! • Trends in ownership and use of smartphones, tablets, computers! • Trackers of Health Data • Use of apps in tracking food consumption, exercise and more! • Combining social networks with other applications! • Interactive Gaming Engagement! • What has been studied thus far and where do we need to continue to explore; the future!
  • Use of Apps in Obesity • Lubans et al. provided adolescents with an intervention incorporating pedometers and e-mail support on physical activity, sedentary behavior, and healthy eating. • Among those in the intervention group, boys increased their step counts by 956±4107 steps per day and girls by 999±1999 steps per day. The intervention significantly decreased the number of energy- dense/low-nutrient snacks consumed by boys (P=0.043) and increased the amount of fruit consumed by girls (P=0.028). The intervention did not have a statistically significant effect on sedentary behavior.
  • Lecture Aims • Why obesity is now considered a disease! • Understand Social Media in Health Care! • Social Media has a place in Obesity Management! • Trends in ownership and use of smartphones, tablets, computers! • Use of apps in tracking food consumption, exercise and more! • Combining social networks with other applications! • Interactive Gaming Engagement! • What has been studied thus far and where do we need to continue to explore; the future!
  • Combining Social Networks • One in five trackers in the general population (21%) say they use some form of technology to track their health data, which matches our 2010 finding. • Specifically: – 8% of trackers use a medical device, like a glucose meter – 7% use an app or other tool on their mobile phone or device – 5% use a spreadsheet – 1% use a website or other online tool
  • Lecture Aims • Why obesity is now considered a disease! • Understand Social Media in Health Care! • Social Media has a place in Obesity Management! • Trends in ownership and use of smartphones, tablets, computers! • Use of apps in tracking food consumption, exercise and more! • Combining social networks with other applications! • Interactive Gaming Engagement! • What has been studied thus far and where do we need to continue to explore; the future!
  • Interactive Game Engagement • Active video games enjoy widespread appeal to youth and have been demonstrated to increase energy expenditure and physical activity compared with sedentary video gaming. • Several of these technologies also offer Internet connectivity, including Nintendo Wii Fit and Microsoft Kinect, and the ability to join an online gaming service that allows one to play games against other members in its online community with the use of an avatar.
  • Lecture Aims • Why obesity is now considered a disease! • Understand Social Media in Health Care! • Social Media has a place in Obesity Management! • Trends in ownership and use of smartphones, tablets, computers! • Use of apps in tracking food consumption, exercise and more! • Combining social networks with other applications! • Interactive Gaming Engagement! • What has been studied thus far and where do we need to continue to explore; the future!
  • Available Apps Thus Far
  • Tracking Weight, Diet and Exercise
  • Impact of Health Tracking
  • Obesity Apps studied thus far - Cyclemeter • Bicycle tracking app • You can use Cyclemeter to track walks, runs, and other activities. • Available on: iOS • http://www.abvio.com/cyclemeter/
  • • This iOS-only app has you complete a test workout, in which you rate different exercises as easy, tough, impossible, or "need to learn," which then informs the app going forward how difficult your workouts should be. • Georges St-Pierre uses the principles of gymnastics, bodyweight exercises and High Intensity Interval Training • You can choose workouts of 20, 40, or 60 minutes http://gspofficial.com/touchfit Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far – Touchfit GSP
  • • Designed for counting calories and logging exercise, can help you lose weight, especially if you tend to eat name-brand American foods. • Available on: Android, iOS, Kindle, Nook, and Web. Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- Lose it
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- “My Plate” • A calorie tracker App • Available on: Android, BlackBerry, iOS, Windows Phone, and Web • @ Livestrong.com/the dailyplate
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- Counteat.calories • Helps you estimate, rather than count, how many calories you consume at each meal • Helps you find a range, rather than a precise target, for how much you should eat. • Available on: iOS
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- Endomondo Sports Tracker • Members use GPS features to track how much they run, cycle, jog, and so forth, and share their progress with others. • Languages: English, Spanish, others • Available on: Android, BlackBerry, iOS, Windows Phone, and Web
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- The Eatery • Use The Eatery to snap photos of your food. We’ll give you something much more helpful than calorie counts. • Invite friends to follow and support you. • Get insight into your eating habits. • Available on: iOs
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- Fitbit.com • If you do own one of the Fitbit gadgets, you can sync it so that the data it collects automatically appears on your account. • On its own, the Fitbit site gives you the ability to record your personal data to keep track of your fitness goals. • Available on: Android, iOS, and Web.
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- Fitocracy • Uses game-like stats to spur on friendly competition and increase your dedication to working out. • You post what you did or did not do much like Facebook. • Available on: Android, iOS, and Web.
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- Fitsby • You and your friends decide how much money you want to wager, and the person who checks into the gym the most in a given period of time wins the pot. • Available on: Android
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- Gain Fitness • Workout coaching app and website. • AIN Fitness runs as you actually work out. • You listen to or read its instructions and it helps you keep track of repetitions and even includes a timer when appropriate • Available on: iOS and Web.
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- Map MyFitness • Map My Fitness will give you the widest range of supported activities • Let’s you track different sports and workouts. • uses GPS to track the routes you travel, and shows you a map of the ground you covered when you're done. It also displays length, in both time and distance, as well as pace, maximum speed, and a few other statistics. • Available on: Android, iOS, Windows Phone
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- My Fitness Pal • All-in-one calorie counter and exercise tracker for the iPhone. • Available on: Android, BlackBerry, iOS, Windows Phone, and Web.
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- Nike+ • The Nike+ Running app, which is available on iPhone and Android phones, tracks your distance, pace, time, and calories burned while you run. • It uses GPS to map your route • Integrates with Nike Fuelband • Available on: iPhone, Android
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- RunMeter Pro • Tracks your run or walks, bicycle rides, and 5K training. • Has maps, graphs, splits, intervals, laps, announcements, zones, training plans and more. • Available on: iPhone
  • Obesity Apps Studied Thus Far- Runtastic PRO • Runtastic PRO lets you measure and track your runs, walks, and other exercises. • Also acts as coaching app to motivate you to keep working toward your goals.
  • The Future
  • Thank You For Your Kind Attention We hope that you can visit our apps display and use the available cellphone software • Hollyeve7@aol.com • Daniel.terreros@ttuhsc.edu