Why do we do Maritime Spatial Planning in the Baltic Sea? The Plan Bothnia test case

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Presentation about Maritime Spatial Planning in the Baltic Sea and the Plan Bothnia test case. I gave it as part of the Erasmus Mundus Master Course on Maritime Spatial Planning in Seville (Spain) 3-6 February 2014

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  • SHOW principles in paper
  • First a short introduction about the editors of the Plan Bothnia publication and the members of the lead partner, Helcom. We think the lead partner team froms an exotic coctel!
  • Planning is solving problems. So we need to start first IDENTIFYING the problems. To do that we need DATA. To start a plan first we need to know what data we have available. Data is crucial and in the beginning of this project we didn’t have almost any. We started almost from an ”empty” sea. I say ”almost” because luckily we had HELCOM. HELCOM is the best example of an open regional database. We got a lot of data to start the project but we needed more and more specific for the Bothnian Sea.
  • Thanks to these people we have maps like this. This map shows where fisher main fish herring in the Baltic Sea. Herring is the most important fish on the Bothnian Sea. Most catches in the Baltic Sea take place here. This data is unique. There is nothing with such detail in the whole Baltic Sea area. It’s made with VMS (Vessel Monitoring System) and catch logs from fish boats. Our Swedish partner created it.
  • Another example is this map showing maritime traffic. We have to analyse where the main route are, whether traffic is increasing or decrasing and the possibility of new roures in the future.
  • I showed you that we have tons of data, should we just keep it for ourselves? From the beginning we thought that it would be best to share our data and processes. Why? Because we think that we all benefit from sharing data and being open. There is no point of keeping all the knowledge for ourselves.
  • Why do we do Maritime Spatial Planning in the Baltic Sea? The Plan Bothnia test case

    1. 1. MSP in the Baltic Sea MSP coherent accross borders – dream or reality Cut to pieces Manuel Frias Master on MSP Seville 3-6 February 2014
    2. 2. WHY is Maritime Spatial Planning important?
    3. 3. The Baltic Sea: a quiet corner of Northern Europe Manuel Frias. Data available in HELCOM GIS
    4. 4. Really?
    5. 5. The Baltic Sea: Really? a quiet corner of Northern Europe? Oil rigs Manuel Frias. Data available in HELCOM GIS
    6. 6. The Baltic Sea: Really? a quiet corner of Northern Europe? Oil rigs Wind farms (current and projects) Manuel Frias. Data available in HELCOM GIS
    7. 7. The Baltic Sea: Really? a quiet corner of Northern Europe? Oil rigs Wind farms (current and projects) Baltic Sea Protected Areas Manuel Frias. Data available in HELCOM GIS
    8. 8. The Baltic Sea: Really? a quiet corner of Northern Europe? Oil rigs Wind farms (current and projects) Baltic Sea Protected Areas Natura 2000 Manuel Frias. Data available in HELCOM GIS
    9. 9. The Baltic Sea: Really? a quiet corner of Northern Europe? Oil rigs Wind farms (current and projects) Baltic Sea Protected Areas Natura 2000 Shipping accidents (2009) Manuel Frias. Data available in HELCOM GIS
    10. 10. The Baltic Sea: Really? a quiet corner of Northern Europe? Oil rigs Wind farms (current and projects) Baltic Sea Protected Areas Natura 2000 Shipping accidents (2009) Illegal oil spills (2009) Manuel Frias. Data available in HELCOM GIS
    11. 11. The Baltic Sea: Really? a quiet corner of Northern Europe? Oil rigs Wind farms (current and projects) Baltic Sea Protected Areas Natura 2000 Shipping accidents (2009) Illegal oil spills (2009) Fisheries (Surface and mid. gear 2007) Manuel Frias. Data available in HELCOM GIS
    12. 12. The Baltic Sea: Really? a quiet corner of Northern Europe? Oil rigs Wind farms (current and projects) Baltic Sea Protected Areas Natura 2000 Shipping accidents (2009) Illegal oil spills (2009) Fisheries (Surface and mid. gear 2007) Shipping density (2009) and much more... Manuel Frias. Data available in HELCOM GIS
    13. 13. The Baltic Sea: Not really... Really? a quiet corner of The Baltic Sea is busy Northern Europe? – and getting busier! Oil rigs Wind farms (current and projects) Baltic Sea Protected Areas Natura 2000 Shipping accidents (2009) Illegal oil spills (2009) Fisheries (Surface and mid. gear 2007) Shipping density (2009) and much more... Manuel Frias. Data available in HELCOM GIS
    14. 14. How is MSP doing in the Baltic Sea?
    15. 15. ”...achieve a Baltic Sea in good environmental status by 2021”
    16. 16. ”...develop by 2010 marine spatial planning principles based on the Ecosystem Approach...” ”To this en WE ADOPT HELCOM RECOMMENDATION 28E/9...”
    17. 17. HELCOM RECOMMENDATION 28E/9 • Develop MSP broad-scale principles • Fill in ____ gaps in spatial ____ • Solve access to ____ • Provide relevant ____ • Develop further HELCOM GIS as a ____source • Carry out consultations on activities with transboundary negative effect on environment
    18. 18. HELCOM RECOMMENDATION 28E/9 • Develop MSP broad-scale principles • Fill in ____ gaps in spatial ____ data data • Solve access to ____ data data • Provide relevant ____ • Develop further HELCOM GIS as a data ____source • Carry out consultations on activities with transboundary negative effect on environment
    19. 19. HELCOM SCALE 2008-2009
    20. 20. Sustainable management Ecosystem approach Long term perspective and objectives Precautionary Principle Participation and Transparency High quality data and information basis Transnational coordination and consultation 10 principles Coherent terrestrial and maritime spatial planning Planning adapted to characteristics and special conditions at different areas Continuous planning Want to know the detail?  http://goo.gl/psCloI
    21. 21. HELCOM VASAB Pam Culver
    22. 22. And now that you know what the principles of MSP in the Baltic Sea are... ...let’s see the story of a project which aimed to test those principles
    23. 23. The fascinating story of how we made a MSP test planbothnia.org
    24. 24. Area: 60.000 Km2
    25. 25. Area: 60.000 Km2
    26. 26. 50% Norwegian 50% Finnish Marine Biologist Master course of Law Speaks Japanese! 100% Spanish Living in Finland Wife: Swedish-speaking Finn Geographer GIS and data visualization freak Lead partner: an exotic cultural coctel Qperello
    27. 27. DG MARE Co-funded under European Integrated Maritime Policy December 2010 May 2012 Phase 1 Phase 2 Data collection Spatial Plan
    28. 28. Test a MSP process Transboundary Offshore
    29. 29. Where is the data?
    30. 30. We started (almost) from scratch maps.helcom.fi
    31. 31. The process Data collection Synthesis The pilot plan!
    32. 32. What did we learn?
    33. 33. The importance of sharing Ed Yourdon
    34. 34. ”The more people that know your idea the more powerful it becomes” Seth Godin Value of the creator Number of people who know your idea Adapted from Seth Godin
    35. 35. Importance of DATA VISUALIZATION
    36. 36. Where is the shipwreck? Maritime Archaeology @ University of Southern DK's
    37. 37. Dick Jensen
    38. 38. Is Plan Bothnia the only MSP project in the Baltic Sea?
    39. 39. BaltSeaPlan KnowSeas PartiSEApate SeaGIS And more...

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