1IntroductionIndia produces a wide range of spices. At present, production is around 3.2 milliontonnes of different spices...
2English name Common Family. Botanical name Parts used11. Aniseed Pimpinella anisum L. Apiaceae Fruit12. Ajowan Trachysper...
3Spice producing states in IndiaSl No. Spices States of India1 Pepper Kerala, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu.2 Cardamom (Small) Ker...
4Item-wise Spices export from IndiaSource: spice Board export statistics
5Major State wise Area & production of Spices in IndiaState2007 - 08 2008-09 2009 - 10Area(Hec) Prdn(tons) Area(Hec) Prdn(...
6SPICE WISE AREA & PRODUCTIONSource: state horticulture Department 2009-10 figure are provisionalSpices2007 – 08 2008 – 09...
7Activities & initiatives of spice Board to promote spice industry in IndiaRegional Quality Evaluation labsSpices Board ha...
8PARTICIPATION IN THE CODEX/IPC/BIS/ISO MEETINGSThe Board is taking part in the activities of Codex Alimentarius Commissio...
9Requirements to become an exporter/importer of spice & spice productsTo start with any export, one has to obtain Import-E...
10IOSTA(International Organization of Spice Trade Associations) –GAPGeneral guidance for good agricultural practices for s...
11INTRODUCTIONThe purpose of this guide is not to duplicate the effort made by the guides that havealready been referenced...
12MYCOTOXINS:Among the many subjects affecting food safety are contaminants caused bymould formation. Some moulds produce ...
13HarvestingThe soil under the plant should be covered with a clean sheet of plastic duringpicking to avoid fruits getting...
14Controlled dryingTo give better quality, reduced bacterial loads and ensure less risk of mycotoxingrowth a system of con...
15does not rewet the product. In addition there should be good air movement throughthe warehouse to prevent sweating and m...
16standard dry container with added paper / cardboard protection (top, sides and doors)is fully acceptable. Ventilation ho...
17IPM uses methods and disciplines that take care to minimize environmental impactand risks, and optimize benefits. It is ...
18than the spice being grown, can have a significant effect in identifying any potentialpest before the level of pests bec...
19also the target pest in question. Plant protection chemical operatives should beprovided with suitable equipment to ensu...
20beans and tree nuts. Care should be taken while harvesting spice and allergen cropswhich are grown side by side in the s...
21investigation that was carried out by the spice industry, that it is now possible usingthe most up to date analytical eq...
22Dressing:The use of mineral oil to coat the surface of black pepper, paprika orother spices is not permitted. The use of...
23Spice export commodity DetailsWhole SpicesAniseed Ajwanseed AsafoetidaBadian seed Basil Bay LeafBlack Pepper Cassia Camb...
24TamarindConcentratesBlend Curry powders likeCurry Masala , ChickenMasala , Meat Masala, Fish Curry, Sambar, Rasam,Instan...
25Essential oilsPepper oil Cardamom oil Asafoetida oilAniseed oil Paprika oil Ginger oilTurmeric oil Coriander seed oil Cu...
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preliminary for spice export

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information and formality related to spice export and details of gap and relevant information for spice export from india

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preliminary for spice export

  1. 1. 1IntroductionIndia produces a wide range of spices. At present, production is around 3.2 milliontonnes of different spices valued at approximately 4 billion US $, and holds aprominent position in world spice production. Because of the varying climates - fromtropical to sub-tropical to temperate-almost all spices grow splendidly in India. Inreality almost all the states and union territories of India grow one or the other spices.Under the act of Parliment, a total of 52 spices are brought under the purview ofSpices Board. However 109 spices are notified in the ISO list.India export spices to many country in the world like U.S.A, U.K, Canada. Italy,Australia, Vietnam, Germany, Japan, Sweden, Belgium, Netherlands ,South Africa, Poland,Spain, France, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Philipines, Russia, Norway, Denmark, Malaysia etc..List of major spices of IndiaCardamom (Small), Pepper, Chili, Ginger, Turmeric, Coriander, Cumin, Fennel, Fenugreek,Celery, Aniseed, Ajowa , Caraway, Dill, Cinnamon, Cassia, Garlic, Curry leaf, Kokum, Mint,Mustard Parsley, Saffron, Vanilla, Tejpat, Pepper Long, Star Anise, Sweet flag ,GreaterGalanga, Horse Radish, Asafetida, Gamboge. etc..However there are more than 106 spices and 54 spices are come under purview of spice BoardSPICES OF INDIA(SPICES UNDER THE PURVIEW OF THE SPICES BOARD)English name Common Family. Botanical name Parts used1. Cardamom (Small) Elettaria cardamom MatonZingiberaceae Fruit, SeedCardamom (Large) Amomum subulatum Roxb. Zingiberaceae Fruit, Seed2. Pepper Piper nigrum L. Piperaceae Fruit3. Chilli,Chilli, Bird’s Eye Capsicum frutescens L. Solanaceae FruitChilli, Capsicum Capsicum annuum L. Solanaceae FruitChilli, Chilli Capsicum annuum L. Solanaceae FruitChilli, Paprika Capsicum annuum L. Solanaceae Fruit4. Ginger Zingiber officinale Rosc. Zingiberaceae Rhizome5. Turmeric Curcuma longa L.Zingiberaceae Rhizome6. Coriander Coriandrum sativum L Apiaceae Leaf & Fruit7. Cumin Cuminum cyminum L. Apiaceae Fruit8. Fennel Foeniculum vulgare Mill. Apiaceae Frui9. Fenugreek Trigonella foenum-graecum L. Fabaceae Seed10. Celery Apium graveolens L. Apiaceae LeafFruit,&Stem
  2. 2. 2English name Common Family. Botanical name Parts used11. Aniseed Pimpinella anisum L. Apiaceae Fruit12. Ajowan Trachyspermum ammi L. Apiaceae Fruit13. Caraway Carum carvi L. Apiaceae Fruit14. Dill Anethum graveolens L. Apiaceae Fruit15. Cinnamon Cinnamomum zeylanicum Breyn Lauraceae Bark16. Cassia Cinnamomum cassia.Blume Lauraceae Bark17. Garlic Allium sativum L. Alliaceae Bulb18. Curry leaf Murraya koenigii(L) Sprengel Rutaceae Leaf19. Kokam Garcinia indica Choisy Clusiaceae Rind20. Mint Mentha piperita L. Lamiaceae Leaf21. Mustard Brassica juncea L.Czern Brassicaceae Seed22. Parsley Petroselinum crispum Mill. Apiaceae Leaf23. Pomegranate Punica granatum L. Punicaceae Seed24. Saffron Crocus sativus L. Iridaceae Stigma25. Vanilla Vanilla planifolia Andr. Orchidaceae Pod26. Tejpat Cinnamomum tamala (Buch Ham) Lauraceae Bark& Leaf Nees &Eberum27. Pepper Long Piper longum L. Piperaceae Fruit28. Star Anise Illicium verum Hook. Illiciaceae Fruit29. Sweet flag Acorus calamus L. Araceae Rhizome30. GreaterGalangaAlpinia galanga Willd. Zingiberaceae Rhizome31. Horse Radish Armoracia rusticana Gaertn. Unopened Flowerbud34. Asafoetida Ferula asafoetida L Apiaceae Oleogum resin from rhizome,thickened root35. Camboge Garcinia cambogia (Gaertn).Desr Clusiaceae Rind36. Hyssop Hyssopus officinalis L. Lamiaceae Leaf37. Juniper berry Juniperus communis L. Cupressaceae Berry38. Bay Leaf Laurus nobilis L. Lauraceae Leaf39. Lovage Levisticum officinale Koth. Apiaceae Leaf&Stem40. Marjoram Marjorana hortensis Moench. Lamiaceae Leaf41. Nutmeg Myristica fragrans Houtt. Myristicaceae Seed42. Mace Myristica fragrans Houtt. Myristicaceae Aril43. Basil Ocimum basilicum L. Lamiaceae Leaf44. Poppy seed Papaver somniferum L. Papaveraceae Seed45. Allspice Pimenta dioica (L) Merr. Myrtaceae Fruit & Leaf46. Rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis L. Lamiaceae Leaf47. Sage Salvia officinalis L. Lamiaceae Leaf48. Savory Satureja hortensis L. Lamiaceae Leaf49. ThymeThymusvulgaris L. Lamiaceae Leaf50. Oregano Origanum vulgare L. Lamiaceae Leaf51. Tarragon Artemisia dracunculus L. Asteraceae Leaf52. Tamarind Tamarindus indica L. Caesalpiniaceae Fruit
  3. 3. 3Spice producing states in IndiaSl No. Spices States of India1 Pepper Kerala, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu.2 Cardamom (Small) Kerala, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu.3 Cardamom (Large) Sikkim, West Bengal.4 Ginger Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, MadhyaPradesh, Meghalaya, Orissa, Arunachal Pradesh,West Bengal, Mizoram, Sikkim, Himachal Pradesh,Tamil Nadu, Uttaranchal, Chattisgarh, Jharkhand.5 Turmeric Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Orissa, Tamil Nadu,West Bengal, Maharashtra, Kerala, Assam, Bihar,Meghalaya, Tripura, Uttar Pradesh, ArunachalPradesh,6 Chilli Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Karnataka, Maharashtra,Orissa, Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu, Uttar Pradesh, WestBengal, Madhya Pradesh, Uttaranchal.7 Coriander Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal.8 Cumin Rajasthan, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh9 Fennel Gujarat, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh10 Fenugreek Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat,11 Celery Uttar Pradesh, Punjab12 Clove Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka.13 Nutmeg & Mace Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka.14 Cinnamon & Cassia Kerala, Tamil Nadu.15 Saffron Jammu & Kashmir16 Aniseed Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Assam, Uttaranchal.17 Vanilla Kerala, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu.18 Garlic Haryana, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Orissa,Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, Karnataka, Rajasthan,Chattisgarh, Bihar.19 Ajowan Bihar, Jammu & Kashmir.20 Dill Seed Gujarat, Rajasthan.21 Kokam Karnataka.22 Mustard Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Andhra Pradesh.23 Tejpat Arunachal Pradesh, Sikkim.24 Pomegranate seed Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu.25 Herbal & ExoticSpicesTamil Nadu.26 Cambodge Kerala, Karnataka.
  4. 4. 4Item-wise Spices export from IndiaSource: spice Board export statistics
  5. 5. 5Major State wise Area & production of Spices in IndiaState2007 - 08 2008-09 2009 - 10Area(Hec) Prdn(tons) Area(Hec) Prdn(tons) Area(Hec) Prdn(tons)AndhraPradesh 327316 1275391 312700 1236858 317413 1266857ArunachalPradesh 9212 53160 9288 53516 9113 55718Assam 73997 171201 82793 216974 82574 228730Chhatisghgarh 12867 10512 12721 9319 12906 10174Gujarat 465258 835157 541710 750101 476400 729783HimachalPradesh 7619 31418 7191 20307 6524 15161Karnataka 233775 510427 246333 645772 257360 363545Kerala 258932 127534 237146 117430 252257 122400MadhyaPradesh 245117 327711 245472 334877 265548 395672Maharashtra 114234 97398 111376 96360 110600 96400Meghalaya 13088 64333 13117 61755 13104 65391Mizoram 7902 140748 26241 98624 13240 70400Orissa 146420 201280 147320 204110 147800 416540Punjab 15753 50123 17528 66802 18722 59795Rajastan 567782 528728 536847 535845 557629 563679Sikkim 34517 44633 33734 47126 31029 41570Tamilnadu 140069 306111 138424 292757 136870 288393Tripura 4292 13709 4417 15586 4885 17045Uttar Pradesh 58527 196311 56132 221156 55648 192162Uttaranjal 7267 56029 7553 58897 9262 67287West Bengal 91426 152050 112934 208726 113268 211128Grand TotalIncludingOthers 2875848 5195762 2948558 5387092 2899887 5286552Source: state horticulture Department 2009-10 figure are provisional
  6. 6. 6SPICE WISE AREA & PRODUCTIONSource: state horticulture Department 2009-10 figure are provisionalSpices2007 – 08 2008 – 09 2009 – 10* 2010 –11(adv.est)Area Prodn. Area Prodn. Area Prodn. Area Prodn.Pepper 198956 50000 181299 50000 198986 50000 183780 48000Cardamom(Small) 69300 9450 71170 11000 71110 10075 71012 10380Cardamom(Large) 30039 4920 27034 4300 27034 4180 26984 3918Chilli 836831 1370853 802896 1381531 809699 1470352 792110 1223400Ginger 123708 775439 143861 831607 142089 708256 148820 701990Turmeric 178021 884306 195076 894590 187535 927912 195070 992940Coriander 457605 286414 537327 471515 530789 501485 530860 482230Cumin 477936 264860 527132 283000 517133 303943 507850 314220Celery 3158 4239 4117 5329 4312 5248 4312 5248Fennel 89894 136984 74149 114277 53497 83576 61680 105320Fenugreek 55520 70155 74512 97533 71985 88979 81220 118360Ajwan 35635 20641 26148 18301 20628 8950 25850 22180Dill seed 18347 20392 13139 13363 8537 10447 8537 10447Garlic 220530 1096459 190468 1003758 187271 975404 202860 1072400Tamarind 55707 187914 54281 194087 44186 125524 59590 206340Clove 2188 872 2172 1002 2081 764 2430 1170Nutmeg 15132 11326 16400 11362 16001 11271 16130 11430Cinnamon 171 347 186 363 150 30 510 40Vanilla 4734 182 4524 168 4173 152 1979 50Saffron 2436 9.13 2667 5.93 2691 4.86 2715 7.99GRAND TOTAL 2875848 5195762 2948558 5387092 2899887 5286552 2924299 5330071GRAND TOTAL INMLN TONNES 5.20 5.39 5.29 5.33(*) cardamom (s) mid term estimate*2009-10 (provisional)
  7. 7. 7Activities & initiatives of spice Board to promote spice industry in IndiaRegional Quality Evaluation labsSpices Board has established its first Quality Evaluation Laboratory(QEL) at Cochin in 1989. Thesecond regional Quality Evaluation Laboratory is established at Mumbai during June 2008. TheThird Laboratory is being established at Guntur, Andhrapradesh and is expected to be in operationduring June 2009.The laboratory at Kochin has the certification for the ISO 9001:2000 Quality Management System &ISO 14001:2004 Environmental Management System since 1997 &1999 respectively. It also has theAccreditation under ISO/IEC: 17025:2005 from the National Accreditation Board for Testing &Calibration Laboratories (NABL) since 2004. The Laboratory at Mumbai is also in the process ofobtaining NABL Accreditation. The Laboratory activities at Cochin and at Mumbai are fullycomputerized and linked with network and is in the process of providing the web enabled resultdelivery facility in the immediate future. Apart from the Analytical Services provided by QEL theother activities are as follows.VALIDATION/CHECK SAMPLE PROGRAMMEThe Laboratory regularly participate in check sample/proficiency programmes organized by FoodAnalysis/Examination Proficiency Assessment Scheme (FAPAS/FEPAS) conducted by Central ScienceLaboratory, UK American Spice Trade Association (ASTA); Public Health Laboratory Services(PHLS), U.K.; Campden & Chorleywood Food Research Association (CCFRA), U.K.; InternationalPepper Community (IPC), Jakarta and the proficiency testing programme organized by NABL. Inaddition to the above, laboratory participates in the ILC programs for the major parameters with variouslaboratories in major importing countries and laboratories attached to Spice Export units in India.TRAINING ON ANALYSIS OF SPICES AND SPICE PRODUCTSThe laboratory is providing training to the technical personnel from the spice industry, Govt. officials andNGOs on the analysis of spices and spice products. Specialized training programmes for a period of 5 daysare also designed to cater the needs of the industry. Training programmes in the field of physico-chemicalanalysis, analysis of pesticide residues, illegal dyes analyses, aflatoxin and microbiological analysis areprovided on a regular basis by the Laboratory.LABORATORY CERTIFICATIONUnder the Scheme "Spices Board Scheme for Laboratory Accreditation" the Laboratory will certifyprivate sector/ the laboratories attached to spice industries after conducting the audit. The certificate issuedis valid for a period of three years subjected to the periodic assessment.SUPPORT FOR ESTABLISHING LABORATORIESLaboratory provides training to the technical personnel in the laboratories attached to the Spice Industries.The Laboratory also provides technical inputs under the various schemes of the Board.
  8. 8. 8PARTICIPATION IN THE CODEX/IPC/BIS/ISO MEETINGSThe Board is taking part in the activities of Codex Alimentarius Commission/IPC/ISO.Spices Board is a member in the National Codex Committee. SpicesBoard Chairman holds the Chairmanship of the ISO/TC 34/SC7 Committee for Spice andCondiments, under ISO, which is under the Beuro of Indian Standards (BIS), New Delhi. TheLaboratory provides the technical comments, data and inputs for the participation in these meetingand for the harmonization of various standards. The Laboratory is also providing data for theestablishment of MRLs of pesticide residues in International Organizations such as CodexAlimentarius Commission, ISO etc .SURVEY ON QUALITY OF SPICESTe laboratory undertakes survey to assess the quality of spices produced at various levels as andwhen required. Samples collected from the major spice growing centers are analyzed for physical,chemical and microbial contaminants including pesticide residues and aflatoxin.Organizations which are working at the national and internationallevel and plays a main role in policy making and all the aspect relatedto spices they are as follows:International Pepper CommunityThe Spice Board of IndiaThe Spice Council of Sri LankaInternational General Produce AssociationEuropean Spice AssociationAmerican Spice Trade Association (ASTA)International Organization of Spice Trade Associations (IOSTA)
  9. 9. 9Requirements to become an exporter/importer of spice & spice productsTo start with any export, one has to obtain Import-Export Code Number(IEC) by Director General of Foreign Trade.In addition to IEC number should obtain certificate of Registration as exporterof spice [CRES] from the spice board under section 11 of the spices Board ActThe documents to be furnished /formalities to be fulfilled for obtaining theCRES as follows:Application in the prescribed Form [Form-1]Self attested copy of IE code certificateRegistration fee of Rs. 5000/- (Rupees five thousand only) in the form of crossedDemand Draft favoring “Spices Board”. The DD should be drawn on any scheduledBank payable at “Ernakulum”.Confidential bank certificate in prescribed format in sealed cover from yourbanker in support of your account/financial status.Self certified/attested copy of partnership Deed/Memorandum & Articles ofAssociation as the case may be [not applicable to Proprietorship firm].Self certified/attested copies of Sales Tax Registration (CST/VST/VAT) certificate.Self attested copy of SSI certificate or the certificate issued by the Directorate ofIndustries in case of Manufacturer-exporter of spices.Self certificate copy of PAN cardPassport size photo preferably with white background of the CEO or the designatedofficer of your firm duly mentioning the name of the person and the companyrepresented for issue of ID card.After becoming a member of Spice Board exporter can get benefits from the Board itprovides guidance in identifying the overseas buyers, and also technical guidance toexporter relating to management of the quality, information about the qualitystandards prescribed for the spices and provides following services for betterment ofthe spice industry
  10. 10. 10IOSTA(International Organization of Spice Trade Associations) –GAPGeneral guidance for good agricultural practices for spice produced byIOSTA with assistance from the International Trade center , Geneva -April 2008In preparing this Guide the following organizations supported IOSTAInternational Pepper CommunityThe Spice Board of IndiaThe Spice Council of Sri LankaInternational General Produce AssociationEuropean Spice AssociationAmerican Spice Trade AssociationThere are a number of spice specific guides that give advice on the growing andHarvesting of spices. The growing and harvesting of spices is a complex matterand is dependent upon the local conditions, whether they are climatic conditions,soil conditions or varieties available for growth.Good Agricultural Practices: include the information related tom growing controls,method of drying ,processing ,storage and transportation of spices and it also giveguidelines to minimize and control Mycotoxin, Heavy metals ,pesticide residue , andalso include the information related to the practices to be followed at the differentstages of production
  11. 11. 11INTRODUCTIONThe purpose of this guide is not to duplicate the effort made by the guides that havealready been referenced, but to produce a specific guide for the growing and postharvest handling of spices to ensure that the parameters that cannot be reconditioned,once the material has been dried for sale, are adequately addressed in the growingcountries. Reconditioning is carried out throughout the supply chain to removeboth foreign and extraneous matter, to improve the microbiological status or toimprove the qualitypotential contaminants in spices and herbs :A) MycotoxinsB) Heavy metalsC) Pesticide ResiduesD) AllergensE) Undeclared colours ( whether from the environment or added)F) Processing aidsIn these cases the only option is to prevent these potential contaminants fromeither getting into the product or being formed during post harvest handling.This guide is intended to aid producers in the prevention of the occurrence of thesecontaminants or to ensure that if present the levels are acceptable from a food safetyand legislative perspective.The guide extends a little beyond agricultural practices in recognition that the controlof these non-reconditionable aspects does not just stop at the point of harvest. Whilstthis is essentially true for heavy metals and pesticide residues, mycotoxins can beformed as several points within the supply chain and thus these points are alsoreferenced within this guide.In addition, allergenic materials, environmental colours and processing aids arealso aspects that can be issues associated with primary processing in a moreagricultural environment and thus these too are addressed in this guide. This guide isnot intended to be used as a reference point for good manufacturing practice as thisarea in itself should be the subject of separate and complimentary guide
  12. 12. 12MYCOTOXINS:Among the many subjects affecting food safety are contaminants caused bymould formation. Some moulds produce toxins that can be harmful to humanhealth. Collectively these are known as mycotoxins.For spices there are two mycotoxins of concern, ochratoxin A (OTA)and aflatoxin.These are potentially carcinogenic to humans. Aflatoxins are produced bymoulds/fungi of the genus Aspergillus and ochratoxini A is produced byboth Aspergillus and Penicillum hence one of the reasons why OTA can beproduced in temperate storage. They are predominantly produced by twofungal species, Aspergillus and Penicillum. The toxin cannot be removed byfurther processing nor inhibited by heat treatment. Ochratoxin A and aflatoxinsare found in many foodstuffs, predominantly in fruit and cereals but also it issometimes found in spices, however globally aflatoxin appears to be the toxinof concern. These moulds will typically grow on foodstuffs that have beensubjected to high temperatures and elevated humidity levels. Note: OTA canbe formed at lower temperatures. Similarly it has been shown that, while theinitial contamination may occur at farm level, the actual mycotoxinformation may happen throughout the entire supply chain, in every stage oftransportation, storage and production. Preventative measures takenby all stakeholders in the chain from field to fork are the best way toprevent mould formation and thus enhance spice quality. TheAuthorities in consuming countries have already set maximumpermitted levels for aflatoxins in spices and are currently discussing limitsfor OTA. Presence of these toxins, above the permitted levels, will resultin the destruction of these deliveries.This Code of Practice is intended to assist operators throughoutthe chain to apply :Good Agricultural Practices,Good Practices in Transport and StorageGood Primary Processing preventing mycotoxin formation.GrowingIn general terms spices will have few mycotoxins problems if the spice is healthy andundamaged. Nevertheless, contact with any obvious sources of fungal contamination(soil, poor water quality and mouldy spices) should be minimized to help the spicesnatural defences.
  13. 13. 13HarvestingThe soil under the plant should be covered with a clean sheet of plastic duringpicking to avoid fruits getting contaminated by dirt or mixed up with mouldyfruits that have fallen prior to harvesting. Fallen fruit and leaves should beremoved from the area as they provide the correct growing conditions for moulds.Fruits that have fallen to the ground are known to be susceptible to mould growth.Fruits that are affected by mould or infected should be removed. Alternatively, the rawspice fallen to the ground should be collected separately, washed, cleaned, dried andevaluated prior to any inclusion within the main lot. Process fresh spices as quickly aspossible. Avoid storage of fruits, especially ripe and over-ripe ones, as any period ofstorage (in a bag or in a pile) increases the likelihood of mould growth. Whereverpossible start drying on the day of harvesting. Wherever possible a system fordifferential harvesting should be applied, so that once products are ripe they areharvested. This ensures good quality and helps prevent mould growth and mycotoxinsgeneration from overripe fruits.Wet processing ( if applicable )The above procedures (dry processing) should be used following the wet processing ofproduct, such as the washing and peeling of Ginger. Particular attention should be paidto spices once they have been removed from the wash tanks. For reasons ofmicrobiology and other contaminants it is essential that any wet processing is doneusing potable water. Once the product has been removed from the water it is bestpractice to remove any excess as quickly as possible so that the combination of excesswater and heat does not encourage microbial growth.Sun DryingDo not dry on bare soil. Use trays, tarpaulins, bamboo mats or drying yardsand make sure that these are clean as it is known that mould spores from previous usecould re-contaminate product during drying. Techniques for cleaning all of the aboveshould be taught to the farmers.The layer of drying fruits or leaves should not be more than 4 cm thick. Dryingfruits or leaves must be regularly raked (5-10 times per day).Protect fruits during drying from rain and night dew and make sure that any fruitdoes not get any re-wetting during storage or any other time. Drying areasshould be raised from the ground to prevent pest ingress and the potentialeffect this could have on mycotoxins generation, amongst other issues. Pathwaysshould be made in the drying area to prevent anyone walking on the crop, asthis can damage the pods and allows mould growth to occur.
  14. 14. 14Controlled dryingTo give better quality, reduced bacterial loads and ensure less risk of mycotoxingrowth a system of controlled drying can be employed. Solar drying is one method,where crops are protected in polythene tunnels and the temperature is controlledthrough the use of air movement. Such tunnels should be designed so that the risk ofcondensation falling onto the drying crop is eliminated. Hot air drying can also beemployed and care should be taken to ensure that there is no risk of fumes from thefuel coming into contact with the product. This can be best achieved through the use ofa heat exchanger so that only clean air comes into contact with the product.A solar heat exchanger can also be used where hot air generated from the sun rays ona heat exchanger are fed into a unit which contains the spice spread on a fine wiremesh.Dry ProcessingThe site processing plant should be in a dry area, as moist, humid conditions such asthose found on swampy land, encourage the growth of mould. There should beseparation between raw material receipt, cleaning, washing, processing andstorage, to prevent any cross contamination.Dispose of waste from wet processing, such as the washing and peeling ofginger, away from clean dry spices. Keep equipment and facilities clean, makesure they have any debris removed prior to using and make sure theequipment is dry before use. Use clean dry bags for storing and transportingdry, cleaned spices and keep dried spices away from any damp material or areas.Processing should achieve a uniform moisture content that is as low as feasibleand certainly not higher than 12.0% using ISO 6673 as the measuring methodor using equipment calibrated to the same standard. Other comparable methods, suchas AOAC, may also be used for this analysis. The drying area should be elevated, toprevent pest ingress and potential flooding, and should be constructed of a materialthat will not contaminate the spices in question.A concrete pad can serve this purpose and in this case it should have a slightly slopingsurface to allow water to run away from the product and should have a perimeterfence to prevent farm animals, pets, pest etc. from walking on the crop as it isdrying. It is important to ensure that the drying yard is cleaned prior to use.Storage and TransportationUnder this chapter it must be stressed that, in view of the importance of temperatureand humidity in relation to the formation of moulds and hence the possible occurrenceof mycotoxins, improper harvesting, drying and rewetting are by far the mostsignificant risks. Product should be stored in good, well maintained warehouses that donot allow the ingress of water whether through leaks in the roof or walls or underdoors, through open windows etc. It is also important to ensure that product isstored off the floor and away from the walls so that any potential condensation
  15. 15. 15does not rewet the product. In addition there should be good air movement throughthe warehouse to prevent sweating and mould formation. Temperatures within largewarehouses can achieve levels ideal for mould growth, particularly towards the roof,thus suitable ventilation should be provided to ensure that both temperature andhumidity are correctly managed.When product is moved into or out off thewarehouse ensure it is protected from the rain during transportation. Make regularchecks to ensure that the truck is covered and that there are no rips in the covers andno leaks on the undersides of trucks which would allow water from the road to get intothe truck. Check from the inside by closing all doors and looking for holes wheredaylight is visible. Trucks must be clean, dry and odour-free. This also prevents crosscontamination from previously transported products (see allergens). Do not load andunload trucks if the product is exposed to rain. Provide shelter so that the spice doesnot get wet during this operation.ContainersDo not use damaged containers. Ensure there are no water leaks. Rust spots onthe roof and sides of containers can be an indication of leakage. Check from theinside during daylight hours by closing all doors and looking for holes andundesirable smells. Ensure that the containers have not been previously usedfor dangerous and hazardous cargoes according to the criteria set by IMCO(International Maritime Organization). These are cargos such as solid or liquidchemicals and other materials, gases and products for and of the oil refinery industry,and waste chemicals and other cargos which have a damaging effect on foodstuffs.Make transit times as short as possible and avoid long stops to ensure that excessiveheat does not build up within the container. In particular do not stuff any container toosoon as it could get very warm sitting around awaitingshipment.Preferably use a shaded area or put another container on top to help tominimize the temperature increase within the container. The roof of anunprotected container can reach temperatures of over 80°C. The subsequent coolingoff during the night results in condensation on the internal walls.Stuffing and shipping Make sure that pallets or wooden floors of containers are dry.Spices absorb moisture quickly if the bags get wet and as a result the moisture contentincreases considerably. Lining a container using cardboard, (single-sidecorrugated and waxed on the inside) has proven to be the best protectionagainst condensation for bags in containers. Kraft paper has also been usedsuccessfully. Control that the lining is properly fastened, particularly in the ceiling sothat the lining will not fall down and settle on the top bags When stuffing thecontainer, bags or bulk, keep spices away from the roof. Bags should preferably beplaced on a layer of pallets to avoid contact with the floor where condensation from theceiling and walls may gather If available, fully ventilated containers are preferable forspices in bags, especially if shipped from a high humidity origin. Alternatively the
  16. 16. 16standard dry container with added paper / cardboard protection (top, sides and doors)is fully acceptable. Ventilation holes in the container are to be kept clear. Do not coverwith tape. Absormatic poles or boxes filled with calcium chloride absorb around 100%of their own weight in moisture and may be used for added protection if parties soagree. The number of bags used should be recorded on the documentation so thatwhen being unloaded, they can all be accounted for. It is important that care is takennot to damage these dry-bags and any spillages should be cleaned up immediately.Enough top space between bags and the roof is important. Use the saddle stowmethod, which minimises side contact and maximizes airflow between the bags. Thestorage, transportation and shipping advice in this section is also applicable to all othersections of this document.HEAVY METALHeavy metals are chemicals that are known to be toxic to humans and are oftenimpossible for the human body to metabolize. Therefore, their presence need to becontrolled, and should not exceed the Codex maximum residue limits, toprevent a build up in the body over a period of time. Within the spice industry anumber of potential heavy metal problems exist, and, whilst their presence is notcurrently considered to be a major problem, this guide offers advice to ensure thattheir presence in spices is prevented.Typical heavy metals found in spices are:lead, cadmium, zinc, tin, arsenic and copper.Potential sourcesIt is important that in spice growing and processing areas the disposal ofbatteries, whether car or portable device batteries, should be disposed ofcorrectly to ensure that they do not decay and contaminate growing areas. Amonitoring programme should be established to ensure that any naturallyoccurring heavy metals, for example from natural ores present in the soil, do notbecome a potential problem for the spices. This is particularly important for spiceswhere ore is processed locally having the potential to contaminate the local watersupply.PESTICIDE RESIDUESThe use of pesticides is often a key requirement in ensuring that products areproduced in an economic manner and are supplied to the market free from insectdamage. As our understanding about the effect of pesticide residues on thehuman population increases it is now key that any potential residues presentare controlled, to both demonstrate good agricultural practices and protect the wellbeing of the consumer.IPM (Integrated Pest Management)The principle of integrated pest management is to have a systematic approach to theuse of plant protection chemicals so that their residues do not become a problem.
  17. 17. 17IPM uses methods and disciplines that take care to minimize environmental impactand risks, and optimize benefits. It is a systems approach to pest managementthat utilizes decision making procedures based on either quantitative or qualitativeobservations of the pest problem and the related host or habitat. A key concept in IPMprogrammes is the application of decision makingProcesses to determine whether a chemical pesticide or other action is needed or not.Such decisions depend on evaluation of the pest problem often in a quantitativemanner.In the evaluation of agricultural crop pests, the point at which the economic benefit ofpesticide use exceeds the cost of treatment is commonly referred to as the economicthreshold. Academic definitions of the threshold concept may vary from discipline todiscipline. Another term commonly accepted is action threshold, which is commonlyapplied to a set of conditions where action is warranted and may be based more onpractical experience and judgment than on refined mathematical models relatingbiological and economic parameters.Since IPM decision making depends on field observations, the role of the pests cout,pest management advisor, or field biologist has emerged. Although do-it yourself field observations may be widely practiced, most IPM programmesrequire a person in the field to collect relevant information on the pestpopulations in question and related parameters concerning the crop or hosthabitat. In addition, the restricted use of plant protection chemicals not only hasthe benefit that there is less chance of pests becoming tolerant to those chemicals butalso has the benefit of achieving higher quality productGrowing locationThe location of the growing area should be such that there is no additional risk ofpest or disease attack of the plant due to the growing environment. This couldbe by ensuring that materials are grown away from waste disposal areas, orthat they are grown away from other plants which are known to attract highlevels of pests or disease. For any growing area it is important to identify whichcrops are growing adjacent to that area and also pay particular attention to any cropsthat are non food that are sited up wind of the growing area. If these crops arenon food, such a cotton, when pesticides are applied the wind can carry thesepesticides on to the food crop resulting in detectable levels of pesticide that are notpermitted for a food crop. The presence of weeds within a growing area not onlycompetes for nutrients but also encourages pests into the area. Before usingweed killer chemicals mechanical removal of the weeds should be undertakenwherever possible.Pest monitoringThe use of trap crops, ie those crops that are more attractive to a particular pest
  18. 18. 18than the spice being grown, can have a significant effect in identifying any potentialpest before the level of pests become unacceptable. For example, a trap crop of castorcan be a very good indicator of potential pest activity within a capsicum growing areaas the pests that attack capsicums are more attracted to castor than they are tocapsicum. In this scenario, regular inspections of the trap crop helps to identify anypotential pest problems at an early stage in the process and removal of any affectedleaves helps reduce pest population. The use of pheromone traps within agrowing area not only helps to reduce the target pest by capturing them but alsoallows close monitoring of the pest so that when plant protection chemicals are appliedit is done in an appropriate manner. The use of perimeter crops, where perhaps a bandof crop is grown around the spice growing area, not only prevents physical entry to thegrowing area for pests but can also help reduce wind drift effects and insect attacks.The use of bird perches within a growing area can have the benefit of providing aperch for the bird to roost and thus the bird will stay in a particular growing area andwill eat a proportion of any pests that are present on the crop. Whereverpossible these bird perches should be located so that they are not directly aboveany individual plant, thus reducing the risk of bird excreta on the plant, andshould be removed for a period prior to harvesting for the same reason.Irrigation : With regard to disease spread it is better if trickle irrigation can be usedas this has the benefit of ensuring that water supplies are used sparingly and also hasthe benefit that if plant protection chemicals are required these can be delivereddirectly to the plant. Flood irrigation techniques use excessive amounts of waterand also increase the risk of spreading disease throughout any particular growingarea.Pesticides: If plant protection chemicals are required then, wherever possible,natural systems such as neem can be used as these types of plant protectionchemicals are more acceptable to the importing countries. When syntheticplant protection chemicals are used it is important that these chemicals arepermitted for the crop in question. It is important to establish whether thispermission also extends to any country where it is envisaged the crop will beexported. It is important that when a plant protection chemical is used that it ispurchased from an authorized dealer who can give assurances that the chemicalthat they are selling is authentic. PPCs should not be purchased from any other sourceas the active principles in these chemical may be at the wrong concentration or couldeven be prohibited chemicals. Once acceptability of the plant protection chemical hasbeen established the levels of dose for a crop should be set which not only establishesthe dilution to be used but also the number of applications that are permitted. Thereshould be documentation on the use of plant protection chemicals. Thisshould include their trade name, their active chemical ingredient, the productexpiry date, the date that it is applied, the dilution that has been applied and
  19. 19. 19also the target pest in question. Plant protection chemical operatives should beprovided with suitable equipment to ensure that they can dose the plant protectionchemical correctly, especially when this is done at field level. In this case the use ofmeasuring cylinders, or measuring caps, as some plant protection chemicalmanufacturers provide, will ensure that the application level is acceptable and thusresidue will be within accepted tolerances.It is important that the equipment being used for pesticide application is washedthoroughly to ensure that there is no cross contamination from previous use. Apesticide holiday, typically a period of 10 days where pesticides are not applied, willhelp ensure that any plant protection chemicals used have the opportunity to dissipatethroughout the plant prior to harvesting.Note: many plant protection chemicals state on their labels the minimum length oftime that should be allowed between the last application of the chemical and theharvest and this advice should always be taken into account. It is important thatpesticide containers, whether pouches or bottles, should be disposed ofcorrectly and not left within the growing fields where the application wascarried out.It is important that any water used for irrigation is tested to ensure that it is freefrom pesticide residues from other crop run-off further upstream.ALLERGENS: For reasons that are still to be fully understood it is now clear that insome parts of the world more and more people are becoming sensitive to potentialallergens. This sensitization can, in some instances, result in anaphylactic shock withthe smallest amount of food ingredient causing this problem. It is therefore particularlyimportant to ensure that spices are protected from potential allergens if they aredestined for use on the world market. Details of applicable allergens are posted on theIOSTA section of the ASTA website.Cross contamination : Particular attention should be paid to ground nuts(peanuts) as it is now clear that these pose one of the highest risks for certainconsumers and therefore it is imperative that during the growing, processing,storage and transportation periods that spices are protected to preventcontamination from peanuts. Care should be taken when rotating crops toensure that a previous allergenic crop is has not left any potential crosscontaminants in the growing area.It is also important that peanut derivatives, such as ground nut oil, are not used inany way for the processing of spices or for the lubrication of any spiceprocessing equipment. With regard to allergenic materials that are sensitizers it isimportant to ensure that spices are kept separate from cereal productscontaining gluten, such as wheat, and other allergenic materials such as Soya
  20. 20. 20beans and tree nuts. Care should be taken while harvesting spice and allergen cropswhich are grown side by side in the same area. If the harvest is more or lessduring the same period a suitable harvest gap should be given among thesecrops to avoid contamination.Certain spices have now been classified as having potential allergenic properties. It istherefore important that systems are put in place to ensure that when these spices aregrown or processed there are suitable clean-down systems to ensure that there is nocarryover of these spices into other spice products.At present the list of spices that come into this category are:Mustard, Celery and Sesame seed. In some countries Coriander is considered asan allergen, so please check the website for the most up to date information(see www.astaspice.org)It is now clear that certain consumers have allergic reactions to the presence ofsulphur dioxide. Traditionally sulphur has been used within the spice industry,either to improve the visual appearance of spices or as a pest preventionmethod.The risk associated with sulphur dioxide should be carefully considered within anyHACCP study.In the EU, for example, if a spice contains more than 10ppm of sulphur dioxideresidues then it has to be clearly labelled as such so that the consumer can make aninformed choice as to whether they should purchase and eat this material.One area that needs careful consideration is the transportation of spices,especially from farm to exporter or processing unit, where in the past it hasnot been uncommon for bags to be recycled for this purpose. In this instanceit is important that these recycled bags are suitably controlled and that if theyhave had allergenic materials present then they are not used for spices. Careand attention should be taken in any common trading yard, where both allergenicmaterials and spices are handled, to prevent cross contamination. A suitable cleaningoperation needs to be adopted to ensure this risk is eliminated.ENVIRONMENTAL COLOURS: It is well documented in recent years that there hasbeen an occurrence of deliberate adulteration of spices with artificial colours. In somecases these colours were not permitted as food colours and in other case these colourswere not declared and thus were deemed to be misleading to the consumer. As aresult of these adulteration incidents it became clear, through the thorough
  21. 21. 21investigation that was carried out by the spice industry, that it is now possible usingthe most up to date analytical equipment to detect the presence of very low levels ofcolour which can be present in spices due to environmental contamination such asmarking inks, colours to assist in applying plant protection products, fuel or dyecontaminated water.Bag markingsTo ensure that spices are not coloured when bag markings are used a food gradedye should be used wherever possible. Bags that have an open structure, such asjute bags, should not have bag marking made on the jute when the bag isalready full of spices. In this case the use of liquid dyes can go through the bag andcontaminate a small portion of the contents so it is better that the bags are markedprior to filling or are marked using a label or tag.Plant protection chemicalsWhen purchasing plant protection chemicals particular attention should be given to thecolour of any chemical purchased. Highly coloured pesticides have the risk ofleaving minor traces of colour on the crop, especially if there has been a lateapplication in the growing cycle.Fuel emissionsThe fuel used for transportation and water pump operation is often coloured.Consideration should be given to the location of these pumps to ensure thatthe fuel itself or its exhaust residues do not add to the environmental andcolours contamination. In addition, consideration should be given to the location ofgrowing areas to avoid vehicle exhaust emissions becoming a problem if there are hightraffic levels next to the growing area.PROCESSING AIDS: With regard to this guide a processing aid is a chemical that isused to help improve the processing of spices whilst it has no technological functionwithin the finished spice. For many years bleached spices have been a tradedcommodity, such as ginger, cardamom etc, and it is important that theirpackaging declares this bleaching and that the residues of any bleachingconform to international guidelines. For many years there have been a number ofprocessing aids used in spices and thus it is important that it is fully justifiable, safeand gives the buyer an informed choice.Any processing aid must be food safe andapproved for use within the country of consumption, and declared to the buyer. Whitepepper During the manufacture of white pepper, microbial reduction agents such asChlorine are used to ensure that the quality of the processing water is maintained. Ifagents like this are used then their dose should be controlled to prevent a carryoverfrom the process onto the finished products, and the final product levels should be inaccordance with International standards. Where this type of process is used it shouldbe declared to the buyer so that he is aware of this and can make any labellingdeclaration required.
  22. 22. 22Dressing:The use of mineral oil to coat the surface of black pepper, paprika orother spices is not permitted. The use of vegetable oil (not peanut oil for reasonsmention earlier in the guide) should be declared to the buyer.GENERALWorker hygiene: Personnel handling the harvest should not be suffering fromany contagious disease which will cause or act as a precursor to cause food bornhealth problems. In the event of observing such signs of diseases the personresponsible for supervising the harvesting should take the necessarymeasures to prevent the person(s) from handling the harvest until they arefully cured from the disease Basic sanitary practices should be practiced bypersonnel before and during harvesting and handling of harvest. Where everpossible, especially in primary sorting centres or drying yards, care should be takento prevent the potential ingress of glass. This includes the removal ofjewellery, the replacement of windows with non glass material (such asPerspex), prohibiting the use of any glass container or bottle, etc. Workers involved inthe handling of spices should be aware of the risk of contaminating the crop and thuseating and drinking should be prohibited in these areas.Field sanitation: The field sanitation standards require the person supervising theharvesting of the crop to provide toilets, potable drinking water and hand-washing facilities to personnel in the field, ensure that each personreasonable use of the above and make sure that each person understands theimportance of good hygiene practices.To find out more information on this contact the IOSTA office atinfo@astaspice.org.Sources : Spice Board of India www.indianspices.comInternational Pepper Community www.ipcnet.orgAmerica Spice Trade Association www.astaspice.org
  23. 23. 23Spice export commodity DetailsWhole SpicesAniseed Ajwanseed AsafoetidaBadian seed Basil Bay LeafBlack Pepper Cassia CambodgeCaraway Cardamom(small) Cardamom(large)Celery Chilli CinnamonCloves Coriander CuminCurry leaf Dill Seed FennelFenugreek Garlic GingerJuniper Kokam Long PepperMace Mint MustardNutmeg Poppy PomegranateRosemary Saffron SageStar anise Sweet Flag TamrindTejpat Thyme TumericVanillaOrganicOrganic Pepper Organic Vanilla Organic GingerOrganic Ginger Organic Turmeric Organic CardamomOrganic Herbal Spices Organic Parsley Organic RosemaryOrganic Thyme Organic Thyme Organic SageOrganic Marjoram Organic Black Pepper Organic MustardSpice MixesCurry Powder Curry Paste Curry MasalaOther Mixtures
  24. 24. 24TamarindConcentratesBlend Curry powders likeCurry Masala , ChickenMasala , Meat Masala, Fish Curry, Sambar, Rasam,Instant Pickles.Freeze driedCurry Powders / MixturesPepper Powder Cardamom powder Chilli PowderGinger Powder Turmeric Powder Coriander PowderCumin Powder Celery Powder Fennel PowderFenugreek Powder Dill Powder Mustard PowderPoppy Powder Tamarind Powder Cinnamon PowderCassia Powder Tejpat PowderOleoresinsPepper Oleoresins Cardamom Oleoresins Chilli OleoresinsCapsicum Oleoresins Paprika Oleoresins Ginger OleoresinsTurmeric Oleoresins Coriander Oleoresins Cumin OleoresinsCelery Oleoresins Fennel Oleoresins Fenugreek OleoresinsDill Oleoresins Mustard Oleoresins Garcinia ExtractGarlic Oleoresins Clove Oleoresins Nutmeg OleoresinsMace Oleoresins Cinnamon Oleoresins Cassia OleoresinsTamarind Oleoresins Galangal Oleoresins Rose mary OleoresinsThyme Oleoresins Curry leaf Oleoresins Parsley OleoresinsCurry Powder Oleoresins Vanilla Oleoresins Spice Oleoresins (NES)Spice BlendsGreen Pepper
  25. 25. 25Essential oilsPepper oil Cardamom oil Asafoetida oilAniseed oil Paprika oil Ginger oilTurmeric oil Coriander seed oil Cumin seed oilCelery Oleoresins Fennel seed oil Ajwan seed oilDill seed oil Mustard seed oil Caraway seed oilGarlic oil Clove oil Nutmeg oilMace oil Cinnamon oil Cassia oilKokam oil Greater Galanga oil Rose mary oilThyme oil Juniper oil Parsley oilBasil oil Horse Radish oil Star anise oilSpice oils(NES) Japanese Mintoil Peppermint oilSpearmint oil Horsemint oil Bergomint oilOther mint oil Menthol CrystalDe-hydratedSpice in BrineOther value added productsTamarind Extract Vanillin Extract CurcuminCapsaicinDehy.Garlic Flakes Dehy.Garlic Powder Dehy. Green PepperPepper In brine

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