Child labour

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Child labour

  1. 1. 1
  2. 2. THIS IS ALSO LIFE!!!! 2
  3. 3. THE SMALL HANDS OF SLAVERY 3
  4. 4. What is child labour?  As pe r UNICEF, if childre n be twe e n 5 to 1 1 ye ars o f ag e , do ing at le ast o ne ho ur o f e co no m ic activity o r at le ast 28 ho urs o f do m e stic wo rk in a we e k, and in case o f childre n be twe e n 1 2 to 1 4 ye ars o f ag e , he o r she did at le ast 1 4 ho urs o f e co no m ic activity o r at le ast 42 ho urs o f e co no m ic activity and do m e stic wo rk pe r we e k, is te rm e d as CHILD LABO UR.  Child Labo ur ham pe rs the no rm al, physical, inte lle ctual, e m o tio nal and m o ral de ve lo pm e nt o f4
  5. 5. Some Disheartening Facts  An estimated 218 million children aged 5-17 are engaged in child labour, excluding child domestic labour  126 million of these children are believed to be engaged in hazardous situations or conditions, such as working in mines, working with chemicals and pesticides in agriculture or working with dangerous machinery, which is otherwise described as the “worst forms of child labour”  Mostly children are sent to work by compulsion and not by their choice  1 out of 3 children(5-14 years) don’t have access to primary education  Approximately fifteen million children work as bonded laborers in India 5
  6. 6. • The “unco nditio nal” wo rst fo rm s o f child labo ur and re fe rs to any fo rm o f slave ry o r co e rcio n, trafficking , pro stitutio n and m ilitary e nro lm e nt • Millio ns o f g irls who wo rk as do m e stic se rvants are e spe cially vulne rable to e xplo itatio n and abuse • An e stim ate d 1 . 2 m illio n childre n are trafficke d, fo rce d into de bt bo ndag e o r o the r fo rm s o f slave ry (5. 7 m illio n), into pro stitutio n (The wo rst fo rm o f e xplo itatio n o f g irls) and po rno g raphy (1 . 8 m illio n), into participating in arm e d co nflict (0 . 3 m illio n) o r o the r illicit activitie s (0 . 6 m illio n) 6
  7. 7. FACTORS BEHIND CHILD LABOUR  PO VERTY  PARENTAL ILLITERACY  O VERPO PULATIO N  UNEMPLO YMENT  URBANISATIO N  O RPHANS THE MAJO R REASO NFO R EXPLO ITATIO NIS THE FRAG ILE SITUATIO NO F CHILDRENININDIA– IF THEY DO N’T WO RK THEY WILL STRAVE 7
  8. 8. Working conditions may not be safe and healthy for children because of their physical differences. Factors that may increase the health, safety, and developmental risk factors for children include: • Rapid skeletal growth • Development of organs and tissues • Greater risk of hearing loss • Developing ability to assess risks • Greater need for food and rest • Higher chemical absorption rates • Smaller size • Lower heat tolerance HEALTH ISSUES 8
  9. 9. • Injuries among young workers: • Active children suffer injuries or illnesses while working. • Industries have higher numbers of young workers in the India. • Psychological effects of child labour: Long hours of work on a regular basis can harm children’s social and educational development The unconditional worst forms of child labour may have traumatic effects. 9
  10. 10. CHILD ABUSE Physical Abuse • Out of 69% children physically abused 54.68% were boys • The State of Andhra Pradesh, Assam, Bihar and Delhi have consistently reported higher rates of abuse as compared to other states. Sexual Abuse • 53.22% children reported having faced one or more forms of sexual abuse. Emotional Abuse and Girl Child Neglect • 83% of the cases parents were the abusers. • 48.4% of girls wished they were boys 10
  11. 11. IMPACT ON ECONOMY 11
  12. 12. CHILD LABOUR AND ECONOMIC • Lower human capital accumulation • Worse health conditions • Slower investment and technical change • Income inequality • Bad standard of living • Poverty, illiteracy and unemployment 12
  13. 13. CHILDREN'S RIGHTS  In 1 9 8 9 , the UN Ge ne ral Asse m bly ado pte d the Co nve ntio n o n the Rig hts o f the Child (CRC)  Article 32 asse rts the rig ht that childre n sho uld no t be e ng ag e d in wo rk de e m e d to be “haz ardo us o r to inte rfe re with the child's e ducatio n, o r to be harm fulto the child's he alth”  Inte rnatio nal Labo ur O rg aniz atio n (ILO ) has allie d its m issio n with the cause  The ILO aim s to achie ve this o bje ctive by 20 1 6 with cle ar plans in place by 20 0 8  Unive rsally re co g niz e d childre n's rig hts are ho we ve r insufficie nt m e ans o f co m bating child labo ur 13
  14. 14. THE GOVERNMENT’S STANCE  The Child Labour (Prohibition & Regulation) Act was enacted in 1986  The Act prohibits employment of children in certain specified hazardous occupations and processes and regulates the working conditions in others.  In consonance with the above approach, a National Policy on Child Labour NCLP was formulated in 1987  The Policy seeks to adopt a gradual & sequential approach with a focus on rehabilitation of children working in hazardous occupations & processes in the first instance THE IMPLEMENTATION OF NCLP AND INDUS SCHEMES IS BEING CLOSELY MONITORED THROUGH PERIODICAL REPORTS, FREQUENT VISITS AND MEETINGS WITH THE DISTRICT AND STATE GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS. THE GOVERNMENT IS COMMITTED TO ELIMINATE CHILD LABOUR IN ALL ITS FORMS AND IS MOVING IN THIS DIRECTION IN A TARGETED MANNER. 14
  15. 15. CONCLUSION  Eve n tho ug h we have g ive n a co nting e ncy plan with which we think this so cial issue co uld slo wly be e radicate d, the ro ad ahe ad is sto rm y  Aware ne ss pro g ram s with chang e in g o ve rnm e nt po licie s and fre e e ducatio n is a m ust to g e t rid o f this so cial e vil that stille xists in o ur so cie ty to day  O rg aniz atio ns like CRY, ACTIO N AID INDIA, BUTTERFLIES AND PRAYAS are wo rking 24/7 fo r the rig hts o f the se childre n. It is o ur duty to suppo rt the se cause s and raise o ur vo ice s ag ainst this injustice that is happe ning aro und us 15
  16. 16. WHAT ‘WE’ CAN DO TO STOP CHILD LABOUR ?  To donate funds in NGOs working for the rehabilitation of street children  To make the rural people aware about the benefits of education  To provide free education for the orphans  To contact NGOs and make them aware about child labour happening in our society  To start campaign against child labour.  To help the government to stop child labour 16
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  19. 19. Lets Join Hands for a better tomorrow. . . 19
  20. 20. NGO PROFILE ACTION AID INDIA One area of focus of Action Aid India is education and 'left out' children (including street and working children). The NGO has 12 regional offices (in Bangalore, Bhopal, Bhubaneswar, Kolkata, Chennai, Delhi, Guwahati, Hyderabad, Jaipur, Lucknow, Mumbai and Patna). BUTTERFLIES Butterflies provides alternative education aswell as basic services to street children and working children in the New Delhi area. CRY CRY targets underprivileged Indian children, including child workers. The NGO carries out child development initiatives all over India. It is based in Maharashtra. CREDA The NGO's work focuses on child labour related activities. It has undertaken projects for the elimination and rehabilitation of child labour around Varanasi (Uttar Pradesh). GLOBAL MARCH AGAINST CHILD LABOUR The Global March Against Child Labour is a global movement against child labour. It has partners in over 150 countries and is based in New Delhi. PRAYAS Prayas works with destitute, street, and working children. It addresses issues related to lack of sensitivity and infrastructure for their rehabilitation, education, and reintegration. Prayas covers Delhi, Bihar and the earthquake affected areas of Gujarat. WORLD VISION INDIA World Vision conducts nine special initiative programmes, targeting in particular street children, bonded child labourers and child victims of sexual exploitation. 20
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