Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Michael Faraday
Michael Faraday
Michael Faraday
Michael Faraday
Michael Faraday
Michael Faraday
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Michael Faraday

2,126

Published on

Michael Faraday's timeline

Michael Faraday's timeline

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,126
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
35
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Michael Faraday 1791‐1867 A timeline of significant events and discoveries   1790    1791  22 September   Michael Faraday is born in Newington Butts, Surrey  (roughly where the Elephant and Castle is today.) His  father was a blacksmith and belonged to a small literalist  sect of Christianity called the Sandemanians. His mother  had been in service in a household in northwest England  before they moved to London.  ,  A contemporary print Newington Butts in the 1820s1792 1793 1794  In the mid 1790s the Faradays move to rooms over a 1795  coach house in Jacobs Mews, near Manchester Square on 1796  the western edge of London where they live until 1809. 1797   1798   1799   1800   1801   1802       Jacobs Mews, from The Life and Letters of Faraday 1803    by Henry Bence Jones, 1870 1804  As a child Faraday attends a ‘common day‐school’ where  he learns the rudiments of reading, writing and arithmetic.  in 1804, aged 13, he begins running errands for George  Riebau, a bookseller and stationer.   1805  7 October   Faraday is apprenticed as a bookbinder to George Riebau,  who runs a bookshop at 2 Blandford street. During his  seven‐year apprenticeship he develops an overriding     interest in science, spending time after hours reading the  Riebau’s bookshop, from The Life and Letters of  books he binds.  Faraday by Henry Bence Jones, 1870 1806     1807     1808     1809  By 1809 he has begun to keep a ‘philosophical miscellany’ where he records what he reads and  performs what experiments he can in the back of the shop. 
  • 2. 1810  Faraday begins to attend meetings at City Philosophical Society and lectures on scientific subjects  including electricity by John Tatum, taking careful notes and binding them.  30 October  Faraday’s father dies 1811     1812  February ‐ April   He is given tickets to attend Davy’s last four lectures at the RI by William Dance, who had seen his  notes of Tatum’s lectures. Again he takes careful notes and binds them into a book.  7 October   Faraday’s apprenticeship expires, he is employed as a bookbinder by Henri De La Roche   December   Faraday sends a letter and his notes of the lectures to Davy. Davy’s reply, dated Christmas Eve is,  ‘kind and favourable’.   1813  January   Faraday is invited for an interview by Davy, but there is  currently no position available at the Royal Institution. A  few weeks later the laboratory assistant is dismissed.  1 March   Davy suggests Faraday for the post and he is appointed  laboratory assistant.   13 October   Davy invites Faraday to accompany him on a tour of the  continent as his assistant; Faraday leaves his job to go  along.  Souvenir card showing Vesuvius, in Italy, from  Michael Faraday’s scrapbook   1814  June  Davy and Faraday travel through Italy and meet Alessandro Volta in Milan.   1815  17 April    Davy cuts his tour of the continent short following Napoleon’s escape from Elba and the party return  to England.   15 May  Faraday is reappointed to his post at the Royal Institution  From 1815 to 1818 he attends meetings of the City Philosophical Society where he gives his first  lectures.   1816  From 1818 to 1822 Faraday works on a project to improve the quality of steel alloys. 1817     1818     1819     1820     
  • 3. 21 May   Silhouette portrait of 1821  Sarah Barnard from  Faraday is appointed Superintendent of the House of the  Michael Faraday’s  Royal Institution     scrapbook  2 June    He marries Sarah Barnard and a few weeks later he makes  his confession of faith in the Sandemanian Church       3 September  He discovers electro‐magnetic rotations (which can be  viewed as the principle behind the electric motor) 1822     1823  6 March        Faraday liquefies a gas (chlorine) for the first time.    1824  Faraday is elected Fellow of the Royal Society in January  1824 and shortly after becomes secretary of the  Athenaeum Club.   He begins work for the joint Royal Society and Board of  Longitude committee to improve optical glass; the project  takes up a large proportion of his time for the next six  years.  December   He gives his first lectures at the RI.        Somerset House, home of the Royal Society, by T.  Rowlandson, from Ackermanns Microcosm of  London, 1808 1825  7 February  Faraday is appointed Director of the Laboratory at the Royal Institution       May  He discovers bicarburet of hydrogen (benzene)  He initiates the Friday Evening Discourses for Royal Institution members and the Christmas Lectures  for children    1826     1827  Faraday publishes Chemical Manipulation, his only book, his other publications are collections of  papers or transcriptions of his lectures.    He continues work on the glass project, from December two thirds of his time is spent making and  testing glass ingots. 1828     1829  May  Faraday’s frustration with the glass project leads to him opening negotiations with the Royal Military  Academy, Woolwich. Davy’s death in Geneva helps bring the project to an end and Faraday stays at  the Ri, although he is also appointed part time professor at Woolwich and Scientific Adviser to the  Admiralty 1830     
  • 4. 1831  29 August        Faraday discovers electro‐magnetic induction, using an  iron ring with two coils of insulated wire, he repeats his  experiments and checks the results the next day.   October            He invents the electro‐magnetic generator.   L: Faraday’s Induction ring, R: Faraday’s electric  generator from his experimental notebooks.   1832  Faraday receives an honorary doctorate from Oxford University. In July he is appointed Deacon in  the Sandemanian Church.   From 1832 to 1834 he works on electrochemistry, inventing, with WIlliam Whewell, its  nomenclature.   1833  18 February  Faraday is appointed first Fullerian Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Institution.   1834     1835  Faraday is awarded a Civil List pension, he initially refuses but, after some controversy, the matter is  settled and the pension authorised by the King.   1836  Faraday becomes Scientific Adviser to Trinity House, the  General Lighthouse Authority for England and Wales, a  post he holds until 1865 and which takes up much of his  time.    He also invents the "Faraday Cage" and explores the  nature of electricity.    Trinity House, contemporary print 1837 1838  20 March   Faraday’s mother dies    1839  Volume one of Experimental Researches in Electricity is published.   Faraday partially retires from lecturing and research due to ill health and does not return to them  fully until 1843   1840  15 October  Faraday is appointed an Elder of the Sandemanian Church. His duties include preaching and  baptising infants.       1841     1842     1843     1844  Volume two of Experimental Researches in Electricity is published       31 March  Faraday and 13 others are excluded from the Sandemanian Church for unknown reasons, most are  restored several weeks later.      
  • 5. 1845  13 September     Faraday discovers the magneto‐optical effect   September ‐ October  Faraday and the geologist Charles Lyell are  appointed to  investigate the major explosion at Haswell Colliery and to  report to the government.  4 November   Faraday discovers diamagnetism    Faraday’s research over the next ten years leads him to  develop electromagnetic field theory.    Faraday’s magnetic laboratory, Harriet Moore 1846  c1850s 1847     1848  Faraday is offered the Presidency of the Royal Society but turns it down.   1849  Faraday works on the relation of gravity and electricity  1850     1851     1852     1853  From the mid 1840s  Faraday researches electromagnetism, culminating in his   establishment of the field theory of  electromagnetism in the mid 1850s which,   when mathematised by William Thomson  (later Lord Kelvin) and James Clark Maxwell, became (and  remains) one of the cornerstones of physics.     1854  6 May     Faraday gives a lecture on mental education in which he  speaks against spiritualism and table turning. 1855  Volume three of Experimental Researches in Electricity is  published                 Faraday giving the 1855‐6 Christmas Lectures, Alexander Blaikley1856  Faraday works on the transmission of light through solutions 1857     1858  Faraday again declines the offer of Presidency of the Royal     Society      On the instigation of Prince Albert Faraday is granted a  Grace and Favour house at Hampton Court, over the last  years of his life he spends increasing amounts of time  there.    The grace and favour house at Hampton Court, occupied 1858‐1967 by the  Faradays. 
  • 6. 1859  Faraday Publishes Experimental Researches in Chemistry and Physics   1860  21 October   Faraday is once more appointed an Elder of the Sandemanian Church     1861  Faraday gives his last series of Christmas lectures, The chemical history of a candle   1862  Faraday receives an honorary doctorate from Cambridge University       20 June  He gives his last lecture at Royal Institution 1863     1864  Faraday is offered and declines the Presidency of the Royal Institution       5 June   He resigns as Elder in Sandemanian Church 1865     1866     1867  25 August      Faraday dies at his Grace and Favour house at Hampton  Court   30 August  He is buried in the Sandemanian plot in Highgate  Cemetery 1868   1869   1870      Faraday’s grave in Highgate Cemetery, taken in 1931    

×